Category Archives: Cannabis, Annotated

select links and resources about hemp cannabis and related topics – especially hemp culture in Japan and other countries

Mendocino setting the standard for medical marijuana access

Mendocino Supes Add Measure G to County Code

Dear Friends,

Living in Mendocino is like nothing I’ve ever experienced before. People here are different and living here is like living in the future of your wildest dreams.  Just take a look at what we’ve persuaded the County Board of Supervisors to adopt as law:

“Neither the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors, nor the Sheriff, nor the District Attorney shall spend or authorize the expenditure of any public funds for the investigation, arrest, or prosecution of any

person, or the seizure of any property in any single case involving

25 or fewer adult flowering female marijuana plants or the equivalent

in dried marijuana, nor shall the Auditor Controller or the

Treasurer- Tax Collector approve any such requests for such expenditures of public funds, or authorize or approve the issuance of any form of payment should such expenditures be made.”

Below is a press release that just went out to explain what has happened here.  Don’t look for any media play now, because we are probably too far in the future for them to understand, but here in

Mendocino, the future is NOW!

Let freedom grow,

Steve

————–

Release Date:

April 19, 2007

Contacts:

Steve Kubby, National Director

The American Medical Marijuana Association (AMMA)

http://www.americanmarijuana.org/

707-964-7743

Board of Supervisors Office

bos@co.mendocino.ca.us

(707) 463-4221

(707) 463-4245 Fax

Mendocino Supes Add Measure G to County Code

UKIAH — Six years after the voters of Mendocino County passed Measure G with a whopping 60% landslide, the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors have finally taken the first steps to add Measure G to the County Code.

The American Medical Marijuana Association applauds this historic action by the Board and salutes those who helped make this victory a reality, including Dr. William Courtney, Jim and Trelanie Hill, Rob Garzini, Dane Wilkins, Dale Gieringer, Pebbles Trippet, Kristen Peskuski, Ralf Laguna, Paula Deeter, Edie Lerman, Dr. Michael Baldwin, and advisors John Gilmore and Tom Knapp.

Special recognition should also be given to Richard Johnson, the author of Measure G and head of the Mendocino Green Party.  Thanks Richard for this historic victory!

Measure G is to be incorporated into Chapter 9 of the Code as Section

9.36.010-090.

Below is the full text of Mendocino’s new Ordinance:

Section 9.36.10: FINDINGS

The People of Mendocino County find as follows:

A)  Cannabis sativa (marijuana) is a beneficial plant with a respectable heritage and hundreds of well-known industrial, medicinal and recreational uses;

B)  Two decades of marijuana law enforcement in Mendocino County has not stopped cultivation here but has unnecessarily marginalized a large number of otherwise law abiding citizens who grow and use marijuana;

C)  Those who grow for personal use are not responsible for violent incidents sometimes associated with marijuana cultivation, but are vulnerable to theft;

D)  The Institute of Medicine has found that marijuana has bona fide medical uses and is not a gateway to hard drug addiction;

E)  Law enforcement has carried out investigations, confiscations, and arrests against persons cultivating and using medical marijuana under Proposition 215 in Mendocino County;

F)  The cities of Berkeley and San Francisco have longstanding ordinances which instruct police to minimize the priority of marijuana enforcement.

Section 9.36.20: PURPOSE

The Ordinance codified in this Chapter will:

A. Instruct the county government to support all efforts toward the decriminalization of marijuana;

B. Instruct the county sheriff and district attorney to make marijuana enforcement their lowest priority with respect to other crimes;

C. Establish a maximum limit of plants and weight for cultivation and possession of marijuana for personal use in Mendocino County, and prohibit the expenditure of public funds for enforcement of marijuana laws against cultivators and users in possession of quantities below that limit.

D. Remove the fear of prosecution and the stigma of criminality from people who harmlessly cultivate and/or use marijuana for personal medical or recreational purposes.

E. Extend police protection to those growing or possessing marijuana for personal use;

F. Provide for the continued enforcement of marijuana laws against those who cultivate, transport and possess marijuana for sale.

The purpose of this chapter is to establish Cannabis enforcement policy for Mendocino County.

Section 9.36.30: DECRIMINALIZATION OF CANNABIS IN CALIFORNIA

It is the desire of the people of Mendocino County that the cultivation for personal use of Cannabis be decriminalized in

California. In this context, the board of supervisors is directed to lobby state and federal governments for the immediate decriminalization of the personal use of Cannabis, specifically by repealing Sections 11357, (possession), 11358, (transportation), and

– 11359, (cultivation), of the California Health and Safety Code. The people also urge the Sheriff and District Attorney to publicly support such decriminalization.

Section 9.36.40: LAW ENFORCEMENT PRIORITY OF CANNABIS

Through its budgetary authority, the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors shall seek to ensure that the Sheriff’s Office and the District Attorney give lowest priority to the enforcement and prosecution of marijuana laws.

Section 9.36.50: SHERIFF OFFICE ARRESTS AND CITATIONS

The Board of Supervisors shall use its budgetary authority to ensure that the Sheriff’s Office makes no arrests and issues no citations for violations of the above state Health and Safety Code sections in any single case involving 25 or fewer adult flowering female marijuana plant or the equivalent in dried marijuana.

Section 9.36.60: DISTRICT ATTORNEY PROSECUTIONS

The Board of Supervisors shall use its funding authority to ensure that the District Attorney shall not prosecute any violations of the above state Health and Safety Code sections nor seize any property in any single case involving 25 or fewer adult flowering female marijuana plants or the equivalent in dried marijuana.

Section 9.36.70: EXPENDITURE OF FUNDS FOR CANNABIS ENFORCEMENT

Neither the Mendocino County Board of Supervisors, nor the Sheriff, nor the District Attorney shall spend or authorize the expenditure of any public funds for the investigation, arrest, or prosecution of any person, or the seizure of any property in any single case involving 25 or fewer adult flowering female marijuana plants or the equivalent in dried marijuana, nor shall the Auditor Controller or the

Treasurer- Tax Collector approve any such requests for such expenditures of public funds, or authorize or approve the issuance of any form of payment should such expenditures be made.

Section 9.36.80: REPORTING

The Board of Supervisors shall instruct the Sheriff’s Office and District Attorney to report on December 1 of each year regarding marijuana law enforcement and prosecution activities engaged in by themselves and by state, federal, and/or other law enforcement agencies within the County of Mendocino.

Section 9.36.90: SERVERABILITY

The people of Mendocino County intend that in case a court of competent jurisdiction should find one or more of the above Sections illegal, the remaining Sections remain in full force and effect.

Can Hemp Save Us From Global Warming? | High Times

Can Hemp Save Us From Global Warming? | High Times.

 

A report published by the Family Council on Drug Awareness, Europe (don’t let the name throw you –it’s a pro-pot organization) introduced the Cannabis Biomass Energy Equation (CBEE), a formula delineating the manner in which cannabis uniquely produces energy that is less polluting and less expensive than fossil fuels and uranium, and is therefore capable of economically replacing them.
One of the primary CBEE tenets is that hemp grows well in almost any cli- mate and reaches its maximum biomass yield in only four months, allowing at least two harvests per year producing 20 tons of cannabis biomass per acre, which in turn will generate 2,000 gallons of methanol to be used in biodiesel production.
The report also answers those skeptics who discount the extensive cultivation of hemp due to economic factors, calculating that only 6 percent of agricultural land in the United States would be necessary to produce sufficient cannabis biomass to supply all of the country’s current needs for oil, gas and diesel.
Even if that 6 percent turns out to be a lowball estimate and more land is required, given the fact that there are almost 600 million acres of unused land in the United States — with some 30 million of that total comprising agricultural land being kept idle by farmers who are paid nearly $2 billion a year by the US government not to harvest — there’s more than enough acreage for hemp cultivation to produce the required biomass.
Hemp for Victory: The Sequel
It’s been over 75 years since cannabis was outlawed by the federal government — but just a few years after deeming it illegal, the United States was forced to embrace the versatility of hemp with the onset of World War II (as immortalized in the 1942 US government film Hemp for Victory). Many would argue that global warming is the worst crisis we’ve faced since the Second World War, so it’s no doubt fitting that hemp could again be in demand — once legalized — as a crucial material to help combat the planetary threat of climate change.
While this needs to happen sooner rather than later, there are encouraging signs. Besides the ever-increasing awareness in the culture at large, there’s been action on the political front. The Huffington Post reported that more than 70 hemp-related bills have been introduced in various US states since January 2014—double the number in 2013.
The US Farm Bill, signed by President Obama this past February, permits any state to legalize the cultivation of hemp for research purposes, and the number of states who have done just that has now reached double digits.

Cannabis May Be Best Treatment For Fibromyalgia, Survey Finds – Leaf Science

Cannabis May Be Best Treatment For Fibromyalgia, Survey Finds – Leaf Science

LSD and other psychedelics not linked with mental health problems, analysis suggests

LSD and other psychedelics not linked with mental health problems, analysis suggests

Does researching casual marijuana use cause brain abnormalities?

Does researching casual marijuana use cause brain abnormalities?

“Cannabis: Evolution and Ethnobotany”

Rob Clarke and Mark Merlin are pleased to announce the upcoming publication of Cannabis: Evolution and Ethnobotany by University of California Press

September 1, 2013.

 

Cannabis: Evolution and Ethnobotany is a comprehensive, interdisciplinary exploration of the natural origins and early evolution of this famous plant, highlighting its historic role in the development of human societies. The plant Cannabis has long been prized for the strong and durable fiber in its stalks, its edible and oil-rich seeds, and the psychoactive and medicinal compounds produced by its female flowers. The culturally valuable and often irreplaceable goods derived from Cannabis deeply influenced the commercial, medical, ritual, and religious practices of human cultures throughout the ages, and desire for these commodities directed the evolution of the plant toward its contemporary varieties. As interest in Cannabis grows and public debate over its many uses rises, this book will help us understand why humanity continues to rely on this plant and adapts it to suit our needs.

 

Robert C. Clarke is a Cannabis Researcher, Projects Manager for the International Hemp Association in Amsterdam, and author ofMarijuana Botany and Hashish!.

 

Mark D. Merlin is a Botany Professor at University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, author of On the Trail of the Ancient Opium Poppy and co-author ofKava: The Pacific Drug.

 

For a taste of the wealth of information contained in Cannabis: Evolution and Ethnobotany University of California Press presents the cover image, book description, and a preview of Chapter 1 text athttp://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=9780520270480 and you will also find editorial reviews at Amazon Books.

List of Authorised Licensed Producers under the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations

List of Authorised Licensed Producers under the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations

You Have the Right to Stay Out of Jail

You Have the Right to Stay Out of Jail

Middle Class Relaxing With Marijuana – Science Daily article reports

Middle Class Relaxing With Marijuana

Adapted from materials provided by University of Alberta, via EurekAlert!, a service of AAAS. Reposted here for education use

ScienceDaily (May 15, 2008) — A variety of middle-class people are making a conscious but careful choice to use marijuana to enhance their leisure activities, a University of Alberta study shows.

A qualitative study of 41 Canadians surveyed in 2005-06 by U of A researchers showed that there is no such thing as a ‘typical’ marijuana user, but that people of all ages are selectively lighting up the drug as a
way to enhance activities ranging from watching television and playing sports to having sex, painting or writing.

“For some of the participants, marijuana enhanced their ability to relax by taking their minds off daily stresses and pressures. Others found it helpful in focusing on the activity at hand,” said Geraint Osborne, a professor of sociology at the University of Alberta’s Augustana Campus in Camrose, and one of the study’s authors.

The focus was on adult users who were employed, ranging in age from 21 to 61, including 25 men and 16 women from Alberta, Quebec, Ontario and Newfoundland whose use of the drug ranged from daily to once or twice a year. They were predominantly middle class and worked in the retail and service industries, in communications, as white-collar employees, or as health-care and social workers. As well, 68 per cent of the users held post-secondary degrees, while another 11 survey participants had earned their high school diplomas.

The study also found that the participants considered themselves responsible users of the drug, defined by moderate use in an appropriate social setting and not allowing it to cause harm to others.

The findings should open the way for further scientific exploration into widespread use of marijuana, and government policies should move towards decriminalization and eventual legalization of the drug, the study
recommends.

“The Canadian government has never provided a valid reason for the criminalization of marijuana,” said Osborne. “This study indicates that people who use marijuana are no more a criminal threat to society than are alcohol and cigarette users. Legalization and government regulation of the drug would free up resources that could be devoted to tackling other crime, and could undermine organized crime networks that depend on marijuana, while generating taxes to fund drug education programs, which are more effective in reducing substance abuse,” Osborne added.

The study was published recently in the journal Substance Use and Misuse.

University of Alberta. “Middle Class Relaxing With Marijuana.” ScienceDaily 15 May 2008. 18 September 2008 <http://www.sciencedaily.com­ /releases/2008/05/080514111721.htm>.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/080514111721.htm

Gov. Romney wants to arrest medical marijuana patients

Subject: HT:  

 

1. Gov. Romney wants to arrest medical marijuana patients

 

Last week, we encountered former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney (R) for the third time. During our two previous encounters, Gov. Romney used our questions regarding medical marijuana as opportunities to discuss his overall opposition to drug legalization and to explain his plan for educating American youth about drug use. However, in regard to medical marijuana, he only said, “I will look at the issue … I will inform myself.”

 

Last week, during a July 25 town hall meeting in Bedford, when asked by an audience member about his thoughts on the war on drugs, he touched briefly on medical marijuana, saying, “People talk about medicinal marijuana. And you know, you hear that story that people who are sick need medicinal marijuana. But marijuana is the entry drug for people trying to get kids hooked on drugs. I don’t want medicinal marijuana; there are synthetic forms of marijuana that are available for people who need it for prescription. Don’t open the doorway to medicinal marijuana.”

 

After the event, GSMM volunteers, including a seriously ill patient in a wheelchair and a medical professional, approached Gov. Romney after the event to ask a follow-up question. After Gov. Romney ignored the patient’s repeated attempts to ask him a question, I asked him, “I was wondering why you don’t respect states’ rights when it concerns seriously ill patients who use medical marijuana in the 12 states that have approved its use. Why don’t you respect states’ rights in that situation, a life and death situation?” He responded, “Because synthetic marijuana is available by prescription. It’s very simple, very simple, very simple.”

 

When the medical professional with us introduced herself and explained to the governor that synthetic forms of marijuana are not effective for many patients, he disagreed, saying, “I have spoken with doctors and researchers, and the medical marijuana effort is an effort to try and legalize marijuana in this country, and it’s a mistake in my opinion to go in the direction of opening up the nation to medical marijuana … I am not in favor of medical marijuana. Other pain relievers are available in this country, and I support the use of those other pain relievers. And synthetic marijuana, with the elements that are essential, is available.”

 

2. Gov. Richardson won’t let federal raids continue on his watch!

New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson (D) has been spending a lot of time campaigning in New Hampshire, and we always take the opportunity to thank him for his repeated pledges to end the federal raids on medical marijuana patients and for his support of medical marijuana legislation in his home state.

 

During our most recent encounter at a meet-and-greet in Concord, I him what he thought about the six Republican candidates who have said they would raid and arrest the sick and dying in medical marijuana states like New Mexico. Gov. Richardson responded with shock that anyone would want to arrest seriously ill people and said, “Don’t worry, if I’m elected that won’t happen. You know, there are people that are dying that just want their pain eased, and so they came to me in New Mexico, 199 human beings that said, look we just want it for medicinal reasons, to be able to use medical marijuana to ease our pain. And I said, ‘Okay, let’s find a way that there’s proper Department of Health safeguards that … we don’t have running rampant a bunch of gardens with you-know-what. Let’s do it right.’ And it’s working, it’s working. So we’ve got to do the right thing. That is the right thing.”

 

 

 

Granite Staters for Medical Marijuana