Tag Archives: adventure

“Get to Know Dave Olson: A Glimpse of Uncle Weed’s World Full of Passion” from boldkick

My pal and long time collaborator at Hootsuite, Chris Trottier and his new crew at “boldkick” – a new social architecture bureau, wrote this little tribute post about me following a talk at Victoria, BC, Canada’s Social Media Camp where i discussed how the “Internet has a Short Memory”. I am truly touched by he and Cindy’s kind words – i am very fond of them as well.

Excerpt pasted below for the record along with a link to the original post.

Raised on a diet of hockey, punk rock, and fanzines, Dave “Uncle Weed” Olson has been writing about his experiences for almost as long as the Internet existed.

A master storyteller, Dave Olson thrives in building communities. His work revolves around being an all-around creative. He is a writer, a podcaster, singer, a multi-hyphenate superstar. Looking at his own website, it’s both surprising and inspiring to see one person who has done so much.

It all leads to one thing, doesn’t it? Passion.

It’s been such an overused word, but it always rings true to the people who have it. Dave’s lifeblood is community, something that we at Boldkick strongly resonate with. Did we mention he’s from Vancouver, too?

As a traveller, Dave Olson has had a handful of experiences with different people with different backgrounds. In a quick interview at Toque and Canoe about his suitcase, Dave Olson shares about his souvenirs in his travels.

“I keep little ephemeral paper objects. Ticket stubs. Crappy postcards. I’ll take an empty scrap book and make it real time on the trip. Then you return home and BAM, the whole trip is documented and you can share it with your friends. I was on a train in the rain in Spain (ha ha) and had my scrap book with me and I ended up partying with all of these great folks. Great way to bridge those cultural gaps. I also like to bring back coins. Little things. I like tiny things.”

Source: Get to Know Dave Olson: A Glimpse of Uncle Weed’s World Full of Passion – boldkick

The Earthship Lives!… In Utah, as a Sauna – Catching up with my Beloved VW Bus

Hey Dave!
So we acquired the earth ship from Zac Down scrawny lil dude who is like a second son to us I believe he bought it from you? I don’t even remember exactly what I wrote to you but ALOT has happened! Check it out she’s the “Earth Ship Volkswagen Sauna Bus” I will send a few more!
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Check out pictures of our cabins here in Utah! Both can sleep a couple comfy or several people & both have Hot tub’s! The Scraggly Squirrel & Angry Beaver’s Den also has Tipi’s, Volkswagen Sauna Bus, End of Trail Saloon gameroom & more!
 
Mangy Moose Retreat
 
 
Scraggly Squirrel
 
 
Angry Beaver’s Den
 
 
Tipi’s
 
 
Hottub, Volkswagen Sauna Bus, End of Trail Saloon
 

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David Olson!   I am the newest owner of The Earthship.
This thing is the coolest thing i have ever laid my eyes on
and i promise to take great care of it, and i will post
photos of it when i am done shaping her back to working
order

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DAVE!
Im so stoked my lil bro trev got a hold of you,
Ok my name is zac i am 19 in draper utah there is a pretty
long story behing the recent purchase of your bus, about 4
months ago me and a few buddies  were just hangin out, now
this is the uncut family unkown story but its how it
happend, so in my friends house we were browsing the net
and came across your  classified add i read it all through
and the end caught my attention, how it had bean everywhere
even held gunpoint, so i told my buddies around me they read
said ya cool whatever, so later on in the night we eat some
fun guy,   so we laugh we giggle we find out the meaning of
life  but the whole night i had the story in my head, so
after that night i knew i had to buy a bus  and travel this
world, so after a few weeks of  seaching  classifieds every
night after work i see on craigs list the same impossible
to find FULL dome  dream machine for sale in logan!  so i
dream that night about it wake up and knew i had to get it
##
So i talk to my parents they unexpectedly  lent me the 450
till my tax return  came,so after i knew i was gonna  go
look at it i tell  trevor about it and he caught the vision
as well so we take the drive  check it out already know ing
some background encouraged the buy, so we paid  for it  and
the next day drive up again with a few buddies, pushed it on
the trailer and took her home, so after about a week of
sitting around in it getting some of the bees out  pictured
in my head what the classic made modern earthship will look
like, after 2 short months the inside has a fold down bed a
sink a dvd player with 2  screens and soon a sun roof, now
all this is just sitting in there loosly  until everything
is ready to  be perm placed,
##dead eugene bus family photo bob reed and dave near st george sunshine daydream blue bus sunshine daydream dave dan kids green bus beloved vw bus ScragleySquirel_36 ScragleySquirel_20 ScragleySquirel_19 IMG_2126 IMG_0785 IMG_2952 Bus hibernating in Logan Utah Bus hibernating in Logan Utah IMG_1538 IMG_0782

History of the early days of Mountain Biking and Racing in Utah

This article appeared in Utah Adventure Journal and shares narrative history from my pal and backlands mentor Ron Lindley, who taught me and others about how to organize races, events, rides, and participate in a scene. Also Martin Stenger who was the fastest rider and hardest toker and fcking coolest guy around, Cindy who was a badass lady on a Klein and Charlie who ran a ski/bike shop in Park City. All these folks were important influence on a 17 year old renegade.

Utah Mtn Bike Variety

I added some comments and may yet do a follow up piece but, in the meanwhile, here’s a chunk from Ron, Martin and some snaps of Utah Mountain Biking and Hot Springs circa 1987-9.

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The Scene: An Oral History of the early days of Mountain Biking and Racing in Utah….

Ron Lindley
Racer, promoter, trail builder, etc. Park City

After purchasing my first mountain bike back in 1985, I immediately started dreaming about racing. Not having any bike racing experience, I had grandiose delusions about how I would just get out there and set the World on fire. I started asking around about mountain bike race opportunities but there were virtually none at that time. One exception was a thing called “Bike and Tie” that I believe was produced by someone out of Park City. They had one scheduled for the Provo area in the summer of 1986, but it fell on the same weekend that I was immersed in studying for Physics and a Chemistry final and decided to give the competition a break by postponing my racing debut. Later that summer, I found out about a mountain bike race that was scheduled for the Wasatch Mountain State Park in Midway and attended it with my riding buddy Brad Sorenson. Brad was literally the only other person I knew who owned a “mountain bike” at the time. I figured out early on during this race that I was not only a beginner at the sport, but that there were a whole bunch of really fast guys who were well equipped to leave me way, way back in the dust. I finished second-to-last in that first race (much thanks to my buddy Brad).

Even with that first dismal finish, I was hooked. I was also determined to get to a level where I could compete with all those aforementioned “fast guys”. My path to glory was made much easier the following summer as some really awesome people decided to promote some really awesome mountain bike races: most notably Tim Metos, Bruce Ewert, Charlie Sturgis and Brock (Hansen?). Tim started running the local Salt Lake City classic “Wild Rose” series, Bruce was responsible for promoting the unbelievably cool “Rustler Run” at Alta and Charlie and Brock put together Utah’s first really big-time mountain bike race Park City’s “Bonanza Bonzai”. These events really represent the starting point for the “golden years” of mountain bike racing in Utah.

Since I was a Utah County native, I naturally felt like there should be at least one race somewhere in the Utah Valley area that could draw the best Utah racers that these other events did. Working with Brad, I started looking for a good place to conduct a race. After lots of searching we found the perfect spot: a Boy Scout camp in Payson Canyon. Hence the “Bike-o-Rama” was born in 1988.

This Bike-o-Rama enjoyed a 4-year run and was a real turning point for mountain bike racing in Utah. After a so-so first year, the race just exploded in its second year and with that success a new partnership was formed. This partnership was between me and an opportunistic mountain bike enthusiast named Bob Walker. Bob’s vision was to develop and series of races in Utah that would rival the old C.O.R.P.s Series in Colorado. He got me excited about the idea and I joined Bob to help him create the “Utah Fat Tire Festivals” series. This was the first N.O.R.B.A. sanctioned, state-wide mountain bike series (which has eventually evolved into Ed Chauner’s very successful Intermountain Cup series). Bob and I promoted a few races ourselves but also formed a coalition of promoters from Logan to Cedar City to broaden the scope of the series. We even persuaded the Canyon Country Cyclists (mainly Bill and Robin Groff) to promote Moab’s first big time mountain bike race, “Moab Rocks,” and add it to the series. Things eventually fell apart with Bob and myself and Ed stepped in and saved the day…the rest is history.

My recollection of the “golden years” of mountain bike racing would not be complete without mentioning a few names of some really special racers who earned my respect and admiration for there incredible talent and strength. The top of the list would have to include the following: Martin Stenger, Glenn Adams, Mark Smedley and Jeff Murray. These four guys were the first super stars of Utah mountain bike racing. Other truly notable racers included Rich Perrier, Cyndi Schwandt, Todd Henneman, Tom Noaker, Scott Lung and Jeff Osguthorpe. I’m thinking of many others but they’re too numerous to mention here. These were the people who were making the podium not only at local races, but national races back when they involved thousands of athletes.

I hope this brief look back sparks some fond recollection for those who were there to witness the proud beginnings Utah’s mountain bike racing heritage. For those who weren’t there but love to race, just take pride in the fact that Utah has hosted some of the best local racing anywhere in the World, and it still does today!

From Martin Stenger (now a brewmaster in Sun Valley i heard)

Martin Stenger
Slingshot team rider, Salt Lake City, Moab, Boise…

On what was attractive about mountain biking early on:
“A lot of the community spirit and grass roots; racing was what you get, it was part of mountain biking. There was a lot of community spirit. Coming from a road racing community, where people were competitive and didn’t hang out much, there was a kind of camaraderie among good-natured people that attracted me.”

“There was no exclusiveness. Everybody was there together; the accomplishment was finishing.”

“That was part of the motivation, to get to the top before the beer was gone.”

My Comments: 

Really enjoyed this article. Scanned a few flashbacks from that era to share from various excursions around Utah circa 1987:

* Canyonlands Fat Tire Festival (1987, Moab)
* Ride to Diamond Fork hotspring
* Rustler Run (Alta)
* Time trial races in Park City
* Moab’s Slickrock trail before suspension (incl poker run at Fat Tire Fest)

Featuring:

Team White Salamander representing featuring Ron Legend Lindley, Gabe Alps W. and a young hippie named Weed with cameos by Brad Sorenson and Pyper.

Tri-Coastal trip with topics on my mind and documentaries in my ears

A few quick shots before i head to Book Expo American in NYC (skyscrapers and everythang …) where i will be shilling the goods for the day job while soaking in some literary and otherwise atmosphere – hopefully meeting up with the filmmaker and illustrator of the Uncle Weed book, Brandon Kiggins of brooklyn, see the wild Alex Grey museum about the his trippy art and of course visit the mysterious haunted speakeasy pub in the village with a local amigo.

Taking Haruki Murakami collection of stories and Herman Hesse‘s Reflections – not the quintessential NYC lit but see what serendipity delivers – i am going to a book show – gotta be something worth reading (and i am admittedly somewhat stuck to older (dead-er) writers). Of course taking mobile podcaster-o-rator/recorder, notebooks and the snapshooter.

Then to San Jose for another day-job related trade show and since no time for San Fran hi-jinks- might be decidedly vanilla so to speak but will likely find some adventure. Will be catching Stanley Cup finals on the road (kinda need a sling box eh).

Back to beloved Vancouver for a couple days before London UK-bound. More podcasting for the job and then heading on a 4 day walkabout – likely to Dumfries (a home of Robbie Burns and one of his many loves – Jean Armour), Scotland and then mayhaps to a festival of sorts in Leeds. Gonna not get too hung up the deets here but i will be stuck with more than a backpack in London so might be a wee bit limited.

Anyhow, this week …

– a new Canucks Outsider is up (Vancouver Giants day at Vancouver City Hall) – next up is my coverage of the BC Floorball Challenge

– went to a kick ass Police concert which deserves along loquacious post of it’s own (which is unlikely to happen unless i start into a list of “noteworthy concerts of my life”)

Police Re-Union Tour
photo by Unabonger

Cosmo and Dingo came to visit for aforementioned Police show – too short a visit (job gets in the way) but good times (note to self: pay them for tix)

– really wanna bust out some more White Poppies for Remembrance episodes – next one will feature a track by Drive by Truckers and a chat with a disenfrancished soul at the New Amsterdam about the conceptual conditions of Vancouver’s  downtown eastside

– listening to podcasts by Rick Steves’ on Rolf Potts’ book Vagabonding), BBC’s Melvyn Bragg (Opium Wars), BBC on Nigeria as Black Superpower, Tavis Smiley‘s interviews with Joe Biden and others, Bill Maher talking to Bill Richardson (Gov. New Mex and Demo Pres hopeful), Scarborough Dude in Tokyo soul-searching and representing plus the usual smattering of Clubside Breakfast Times and KEXP goodness.

A few activities on Island of Guam, Micronesia

(Photo credit unknown but maybe from a satellite or otherwise rather high up - oh yeah this is Talafofo bay.) An old friend who is now living in Zambia (look it up) was bound for Guam for a brother’s wedding and dropped me a note asking for tourist tips. My time in Guam is worthy of a novella or two but much time has passed and development and typhoons have changed the island – an island which is always in change anyhow – a stange tension of military, tourism and local cultures make for a curious fishbowl.

While i will (really) one day write more on this, here are a few quick notes for others bound for Guam.

Guam … it’s been a while so most restaurants and stuff are probably changed but you should rent/borrow a car and drive to Talafofo and visit the little sandy beach there and go to Jeff’s Pirate Cove – it is close to where Yokoi-san (i think that was his name – the soldier who hid in the jungle for years) was discovered and it is a cool beach restaurant and bar and tourist stop. I used to sell my juggling sticks there. Here’s Jeff’s (there is another Jeff’s Pirate Cove in Palau coincidentally) http://www.jeffspiratescove.com and here’s about Yokoi: http://www.jeffspiratescove.com/yokoi.htm
Dave at starsan beachIf you have time and money, visiting Cocos island (a resort at the south end of the island) is rad cause you can swim with dolphins sometimes and explore some great reefs. I worked at Star Sand Private beach club which was a beautiful location through the Air Force base but not sure if it is still in business or whatever (nothing on the internet).

There used to be a great beach restaurant called Tahiti Rama right on Tumon bay but i think it is gone. Apparently they took over the old island dance show which performed at Tahiti Rama’s including fire stick/staff dance by “King” Tana, (my buddy from Tahiti if you happen to see his show, tell him “Haole Dave” said high – his brother from the reggae band too) and moved it to the Fisheye park.

This fisheye aqua park was just being built when i was there but sounds pretty cool (i scuba’ed at the bomb holes there before): http://www.fisheyeguam.com/optional/e_Optional.htm

Here’s more … according to this blog post: http://www.namamalo.org/weblog/2002_11_01_archive.html

“The observatory is located in the largest of the Piti Bomb Holes, pockets of deep water within the reef offshore of the village of Piti. Local legend attributes their creation to bombs dropped in World War II, but the bomb holes are actually the remains of collapsed caves, similar to Shark’s Hole north of Tanguisson Beach. The observatory, which looks like a flying saucer hovering above the water, is reached by a long causeway above the reef flat. Once inside, a spiral staircase descends twenty feet below the waves to the observation deck. Large porthole windows located around the circumference allow for viewing the fish, shrimp, sponges and anemones in their natural habitat.

After convening at the observatory and watching the sunset, our group migrated back to the the main building on shore. This building houses a gift shop, several large aquariums, the buffet dinner and the Polynesian dancing show. The food was onolicious, a tantalizing seafood buffet, complete with sushi and sashimi. Once we ate our fill, the show began. The dancing was great, and it was like visiting an old friend. The show, the musicians, the performers, the entire act was lifted from the venerable Tahiti Rama beach bar in Tumon. Tahiti Rama was the quintessential beach bar in Guam, a favorite watering hole and destination for many years. They had a great island dance show on Friday nights for a couple years, highlighted by Tana’s fire dance and the owner’s guitar playing and running commentary. Several years ago Tahiti Rama was leveled by hotel expansion in Tumon and I always wondered what happened to the owner and his great Polynesian show. Well he relocated to Fish Eye. And the show is better than ever.”

Carabao

Anyhow the southern end is totally worth checking out – entirely different from all the busy tourist area and groovy villages and sites along the way plus nice hikes if you are so inclined – i liked being away from the duty free stores and tour buses for sure!

For surfing (boogie boarding is more common due to the shallow breaks with mere centimeters covering harsh coral, Talafofo is the forgiving sandy break, Boat Basin is closest to Tumon beach but the water is nasty and the break intense, Magundas (pictured) has nice waves and beautiful scenery out to the open ocean but takes a level of competence to understand the currents as well as the routine of getting in and out of the water after trekking down a rock cliff. If not careful, you could end up in the Phillipines!

There is also a lot of seedy areas with “massage” parlors and all-night bars for drunken sailors so stay away from there ;-).

Magundas surf break in guam