Tag Archives: documentation

Internet Has a Short Memory – Artifacts from #SMCamp 2016

Festive Flashbacks from Orion to Nelson ~ Choogle On! #99

Hustling to a bus, Uncle Weed ends the festive period with vaporization session and recounts highlights, hi-jinks and life remixes from 2010 including gut surgery, True North Media House social reporting at the Olympics including Olympic Outsider podcasts, Subpop Records, Hockey Hall of Fame, SXSW, Komasket Music Festival, UW40 party, Halloween at the Waldorf hotel, visits from friends, and then a decompression road trip to Nelson with forays to ferries, hot springs and local organic beers. Ends with clumsy thanks to the Chooglers who had my back during the past year.

Musical interludes including an skat/vocal rendition of a Charlie Parker tune by Nico from Savage Blade.

See also Best Year in Years ~ 2010 Flashback blog post including more 2010 highlights a video from the aforementioned ferry ride.

Sit on the park bench for Festive Flashback from Orion to Nelson – Choogle On! #99 (.mp3, 30MB, 23:49)

Festive Flashbacks from Orion to Nelson - Choogle On! #99

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Podcast Goodness

Postcards from Gravelly Beach – Literature podcast – Feed – iTunes – Blog

Out n’ About with Uncle Weed – Travelin’ man vidcast – Show – Feed – iTunes

Ephemeral Feasthouse – Miscellanea & spiels – Blog – Feed – Podcast

Visit

Uncleweed.net for more writings, podcasts, paintings and photos

Follow along via Twitter @uncleweed and/or @choogleon

Gear

I use Koss SterophonesM-Audio MicroTrack IIM-Audio Solo audio interfaceGriffin iMic and Sony Microphone – in case you were wondering.

Vancouver History author Chuck Davis Letter to People

Vancouver History author Chuck Davis Letter to People

On Remembrance Day, war stories from Vimy to Baghdad

Originally published in Vancouver Observer on Nov. 10, 2010. Republished here intact for posterity.

white poppy for peaceEach Remembrance Day, I’m sure to put forth that there is significant importance in documenting the stories from those affected by war—from veterans and dodgers to widowers and pacifists.

By gathering the anecdotes and artifacts of war, we honour the noble efforts of regular folk in desperate circumstances. Further, we aid in the prevention of costly violent errors in the future by bearing witness and sharing what already know.

Nobility of Documentation

I feel there is great power in documentation and in gathering and sharing stories.

For me, the reasons for capturing memories are most clear around Remembrance Day when otherwise pacific elders are resplendent with dusty spangles, propped by stiffened knees, and tears are rather expected.

Yet another war memorial
Photograph of “yet another” war memorial in London by author

With the fading and guarded memories of veterans in mind, I extol the virtues of archiving the oral tradition and preserving the ephemera in attics and shoeboxes with the maxim, “Those who don’t know history are doomed to repeat it,” in mind.

To my eyes, there is scant glory in the macro-reasons for war, but noble sadness (even wabi sabi in Japanese aesthetic terms), and I have utmost respect for the efforts made by the those who are obliged to participate in conflict – regardless of their roles or reasons. 

Why I Gather

While wars go on, I would be a regrettable resister if I did not study, remix and share the stories of those at war, in years present and past. I’ve seen concentration camps near Muchen’s Oktoberfest and the rusted hulks of tanks reclaimed by jungles onPeleliu. I’ve dived amongst the leftover debris of dead sailors near Guam. I’ve sat with the winners and losers of wars and listened to stories from civilian employees, special ops and draft dodgers. All are equal to my ears.

Now, with the tactile poignancy of a brother in Afghanistan (expected home soon), who also toured Iraq, combined with a crust of cynicism from the recent US mid-term elections – and watching on-going domestic political squabbling while pragmatic advice is ignored and the fallen come home, I can offer no more reason to remember than the obvious. Flanders Field on endless loop, the narrative is still the same. No change, no evolution.

While my ballot apparently is not strong enough to spare lives, I can hope to change minds for the future by compiling the stories of those in the fray,  both past and more recent.

Listen to Veterans

Lt. Magnum out n' about reconstructing in Iraq
US Navy Lt. “Magnum” makes local friends in Iraq (photographer unknown)

On this Remembrance Day, I’ve gathered two audio stories from wars,  referred to anecdotally with names like the Great War, the Just War (and the Mistake War).

The first audio podcast features snippets from diaries written in the WWI trenches read by Ian Bell, the veteran’s grandson, on Remembrance Day – last year on the drizzly steps of the Library (with whiskey to keep us warm).

The second audio documentary includes musings from a US Navy officer who’d recently returned from Iraq. He doesn’t discuss the clumsy politics, weapons of missing destruction or casualties, but rather the everyday activities of eating and meeting locals.

Vimy Ridge Diaries on Remembrance Day

Vimy Rdge Diaires

Description:

 “On Remembrance Day in sunny, brisk Vancouver, Ian Bell (fresh from a CBC appearance “On The Coast“), joins Dave to read from Grandpa Mark’s diaries written in the trenches of WWI as a young Canadian. From the library steps with a flask of scotch, Ian and Dave reflect on the costs and motivations of war, the importance of friendship and the ethereal experience of going “over the top” and facing the terror on the other side. Their conversation features anecdotes about capturing Germans soldiers and a discourse on the importance of personal documentation to pass forward to generations.”

Download Audio: 
Vimy Ridge Diaries on Remembrance Day – Postcard # 61

Reconstructing Mesopotamia with Lt. Magnum

choogle-magnum

Description:

 “With a US Naval Lieutenant at the table, Uncle Weed traces the history of the Tigris and Euphrates crescent and discusses the ground level experience of life in Iraq. Lt. Magnum explains his rebuilding mission to Kurdistan, plus his quests to various coalition bases including the Korean, Slovakian and Polish forces. Anecdotes includeHaliburton’s food, smoking hookah in Qatar, religious concessions, cables on marble walls, hiking the rolling hills and meeting local folks just getting by in a war-torn world.”

Every Year

pipers in west van

As for me, this year on November 11th I’ll be at another ceremony. Each year, I choose a new location.

Last year was UBC, the year before was Cates Park, the year before Victory Square.

This year maybe the Japanese cenotaph in Stanley Park or a parade in West Vancouver. You might find me listening to bagpipes and wondering why we are so slow to learn.

And I’ll have my recorder in my mitten to capture any answers from seasoned minds, capturing their words to share with the future in case anyone is listening.

Social Media webisode from With Glowing Hearts film documenting 2010 Olympics

I’ve participated and supported Andrew Lavinge and Jon Onroy‘s documentation of the social changes and cultural mishaps surrounding the 2010 Winter Olympics called “With Glowing Hearts.”

Now they are sneaking bits out the back door of the editing lab and i’m sharing a clip focused on social media featuring the brilliant Amber Case, the wise Michael Tippett, the educated Andy Miah and the charming April Smith.

Heart Still Glowing? Support Olympic Documentary Film with a Two-nie

@kk and @uncleweed at @wghthemovie pre-screening in Dec. 2009
@kk and @uncleweed at @wghthemovie pre-screening in Dec. 2009

Cross-posted (with some modification) from True North Media House blog post With Glowing Hearts – Tweet and Toonie Torch Relay by Jason Sanders. Re-posted here to rally support for this worthy project — more at: With Glowing Hearts wants to make you a producer!

Also worth noting that Andrew Lavigne also shot/edited my Northern Voice 2010 presentation and many other of my talks, prezos and mis-adventures over the past years.

Two years ago, Andrew Lavigne and Jon Ornoy took it upon themselves to capture the 2010 Winter Games‘ effect on Vancouver from the perspective of people directly impacted by the Olympics.

Downtown Eastside residents, bloggers, photographers, activists, proponents and opponents found themselves infront of Andrew and Jon’s cameras as With Glowing Hearts documented the changes and opportunities experienced by four individuals during the lead up and execution of the largest event in British Columbia’s history.

Now, the Games are over, the cleanup is almost complete, the province is reviewing Olympic related finances and the stories have been captured. All that remains, however, is the expensive process of distilling hours of raw video into a narrative that spans two years and four stories.

In order to complete the film, Andrew, Jon and Kemp Edmonds created the Tweet and Toonie Torch Relay–a social media campaign designed to promote the film on Twitter, blogs and other online tools while helping raise the $10,000 needed to complete the film. It’s easy and fast to support this project. All you need to do is follow the steps outlined by Kemp below.

For just $2 you can become a producer: your name will appear in a word cloud much like this. A $2 donation will show your name in size one font while a $200 donation will show your name in size 100 font. All fonts are proportional to the largest contribution. An image will be posted of the cloud and made available as a poster.

Enter to win a producer credit and copy of the film with a tweet: You can also enter to win a weekly prize of a DVD or digital copy of the film and a $20 producer credit (size 10 font). Each tweet represents an entry. winner will be chosen at random. All you have to do to enter is tweet one of these messages:

  • I am a proud supporter and hopefully winner of a copy of the film #withglowinghearts and a producers credit! http://wghthemovie.ca
  • Only $2 makes me a movie producer #withglowinghearts http://wghthemovie.ca
  • I am entering to win a film credit and a copy of the film #withglowinghearts http://wghthemovie.ca
  • Support local documentaries. Become a producer #withglowinghearts http://wghthemovie.ca

(source: Kemp Edmonds)

While you donate and tweet an entry to the contest, check out this short webisode featuring True North Media House. It’s one of four clips released in anticipation of this campaign and the rest can be found embedded in Kemp Edmonds’ article announcing With Glowing Hearts’ fundraising efforts.

More:

Previews of the film at: WGHthemovie.ca- Webisode #2 ‘True North Media House’ from Andrew Lavigne on Vimeo.

 

Seabus Voyage: 11 minute crossing of Burrard Inlet on a rainy Vancouver day

The Seabus is a passenger ferry running between downtown Vancouver and North Vancouver across the Burrard Inlet. The crossing generally takes about 11-12 minutes. This video is a simple single shot of the crossing with ambient sound and no alterations.

The Seabus (there are 3: The Otter, and The Beaver, were launched in 1977 and the Pacific Breeze was launched in late 2009 just before the Winter Olympics) are operated by Translink, the transit authority for the greater Vancouver BC area. Many folks ride this daily as part of their commute to work in downtown or even closer, in Gastown or Railtown.

Further Reading on the launch of the Breeze:
http://www.miss604.com/2009/12/new-seabus-pacific-breeze-now-in-operation.html

The dock on the south side is adjacent of the wharves of Canada Place and accessible via Waterfront Station or the Heliport door on the low road. The north dock is in a complex with Lonsdale Quay market — a great tiny alternative to the busy (especially in the summer) Granville Island Market.

Both docks closely connected with other transit modes: at Waterfront, all Skytrain lines and Westcoast Express train; and, busses to all points on the North Shore at Lonsdale Quay (including busses to Grouse Mountain, Deep Cove and Horsehoe Bay).

Tip: Exit via the Heliport door and walk to unknown CRAB park just a few 100 metres away to the east – further east, a bridge connects you to the north end of Main St.

Tip: Ride the Seabus to North Vancouver and catch the 228 bus and ride to Lynn Valley Suspension Bridge. It’s free, unlike Capilano, and it’s not a tourist trap

Global Party List ~ Olympics to SXSW – Choogle On #84

In between Winter Olympics and SXSW, Uncle Weed soothes a sore throat on a couch and talks about global parties of note (including Oktoberfest, Mardi Gras, Carnival, etc.), plus extols about the Olympic Outsider podcast, True North Media House, importance and nobility of documentation, SXSW preview and recap of recent trip to Pe Ell to visit Hemp Ed and the Numbskulz.

Crack a tall can for: Global Party List ~ Olympics to SXSW – Choogle On #84 (.mp3, 15:40)

Global Party List

Subscribe

Grab the Choogle On RSS feed or subscribe Choogle On via iTunes – Choogle On by Email

Podcast Goodness

Postcards from Gravelly Beach – Literature podcast – Feed – iTunes – Blog

Out n’ About with Uncle Weed – Travelin’ man vidcast – Show – Feed – iTunes

Ephemeral Feasthouse – Miscellanea & spiels – Blog – Feed – Podcast

Clubside Breakfast Time – Indie rock + political unditry – Blog – Feed – iTunes

Visit

Uncleweed.net for more writings, podcasts, paintings and photos

Follow along via Twitter @uncleweed and/or @choogleon

Gear

I use Koss SterophonesM-Audio MicroTrack IIM-Audio Solo audio interfaceGriffin iMic and Sony Microphone – in case you were wondering.

Still Vancouver’s Olympics ~ Creating the People’s History of 2010

Originally appeared in Vancouver Observer as Creating the People’s History of 2010: Accredit Yourself and Start Reporting, Partying, and Schmoozing with the World

“You know it’s gonna get stranger, so let’s get on with the show” Shakedown Street, Grateful Dead

Ours to Document

early reconn of 120 and 90 ski jumps Dave OlsonHow are you spending your Olympics? No matter how you roll, whether you plan to celebrate, protest, or observe, my admonition is to document the people’s history about how the Olympics interacts with our communities like historian Howard Zinn would advise. Perhaps you’re skipping out of school to see some events or explore Vancouver’s hidden gems? Good. Recluse J.D. Salinger woulda wanted you to, but wouldn’t let you know it.

Indeed, the frustrations many feel about the Games is because the VANOC doesn’t represent “us” the way we see ourselves and we want the world to see our communities the way the really are. Not the fabricated, sanitized version TV will spew to the world. Alas, most any sense of excitement is overshadowed by the broken promises, funding overruns, security boondoggles and twisted public priorities. However, the Games are coming soon.

And if we don’t tell the stories from the street, who will?

Accredit Yourself

John Biehler beta test the badge

My personal objectives are:a) story making; b) internationalizing; c) good times.

In other words, I’ll be seeking stories about lesser known athletes, civic conundrums, and festive adventures and inviting other social story tellers along for my forays and finding the best hospitality along the way.

Wanna do the same?

Declare your intentions with a self-accreditation badge and share something you enjoy. Lead a walking tour of Chinatown, the old Expo grounds or your own neighbourhood. Maybe host a pub meet-up for Latvian hockey fans, or show up for a blogger tour of the Police Museum. Rally a field trip to Surrey or Richmond for celebrations and cultural exchange with the rest of the outsiders. I’m envisioning a moveable feast of ad hoc events led by anyone, attended by anyone, no signup. Go with the flow, share your skills and content using web tools.

I plan to meet international arts and media-minded visitors and show them Vancouver beyond Stanley Park and Granville Island (though those are great too).

Personal Documentation

“The first thing you’ll probably want to hear is about my trip to Nagano, Japan where I rented a crumby flophouse to turn into a coffee and craft shop and all that kinda David Copperfield kinda crap, but all I remember from Nagano is that snowboarder whassis name getting all hassled – why can’t anyone just leave people alone – makes ya wanto head to the mountains and live in a bunker.”

– (not a) lost chapter from Catcher in the Rye


SLC 2002

Claudia Pechstein on drums

After seeing the torch in Olympia, WA, I loaded up a car with my brother, a stack of tickets, two ounces of herbal supplements and a trunk full of NW micro-brews and smoked meats and cheeses. After 13 days and 28 events, I’d documented with 700+ photos, dozens of video clips, a couple TV appearances, partied with gold medalists and lent Don Cherry my hat.

I also learned the power of grassroots reporting by sharing a video clip of the first-ever Nepali Winter Olympian (vid) and observed the passion of Latvian hockey fans. I also learned what you see on TV is very different from on the ground – ain’t it all bad. Heck, the Olympics brought public transit and liberalized beer laws to Utah!

Torino 2006

Coffee talk with Gold Medalist Ross Rebagliati

I remained in Vancouver, living on Torino time with 4:00 AM cappuccinos and frustrating hockey games while my colleagues Mssrs. Krug and Scales were the new media pioneers encamped in Turin at the Piedmonte Non-accredited Media Centre, testing streaming video cams, visiting hospitality houses, and rallying photo walks in between events and business outreach.

I assembled a collection of Olympic Outsider podcasts and frequent Olympic Notebooks to document the sports, media, and business issues of the games. But the gem of the Torino 2006 social media experiment was the “Social Media and Sports Symposium” – a panel discussion delivered from Vancouver and Turin over the web featuring Ross Rebagliati discussing the changing role of blogging since Nagano with Roland Tanglao and Will Pate ~ the old media begin to notice the magma bubbling up from renegade tech-journ-artists.

Beijing 2008

Chinese snacks by KK

Everyone wondered how the bureaucracy and policies of social control would affect every aspect of the Games and the torch relay was famously interrupted several times and the Olympics became a politically-charged event akin to days of Moscow and LA boycotts compared to relatively non-political Games in Athens and Sydney.

This time around, I again contextualized content from colleagues Kris and Rob who stormed Beijing like savvy pirates covering street food, conferences and fencing. From the Occident, I assembled massive storypacks from their artifacts through Raincity Studios and crafted educational toolkits and closely observed the nuances of IOC’s priority of protecting rights-holders.

Vancouver 2010

duff gibson - gold medalist

Leading up to Vancouver turn to spend, there were a bevy of events to podcast including the Governor-General presenting the Olympic flag from Oslo, the flag tour with Crispin Lipscomb and Duff Gibson, plus reconnaissance of venues in Whistler, Cypress, Richmond and Vancouver.

But the big effort started with rejection from the worldwide press briefing and an open letter to VANOC – which sparked commentary, meetings and ideas. The letter also attracted media of all flavors to the conversation about the roles and regulations in the grey space between “accredited journalists” and “fans with cameras and recorders.”

Now the fruits of this conversation are evident with publications and organizations building coverage communities and logistical resources for all sorts of journos – more on these below.

Handing the Laptop

London 2012

Scales, Miah and Krug - Olympic buccaneers - photo courtesy of Andy Miah

A few months ago at the IOC Congress in Copenhagen, ad man Martin Sorrell spoke about the “Digital Revolution” (video) Slide Deck (.pdf) to the assembled dignitaries and extolled the virtues of easing IP restrictions, embracing fan media makers and using social media channels.

While VANOC was late to the revolution (they have made efforts @2010Tweets – Youtube), London has a head of New Media evangelizing Change, Social Media and London 2012 plus concerned citizens are using social media in a non-confrontational manner to express concerns directly to Jacques Rogge. Dr. Andy Miah of Univ. of Western Scotland will be documenting what he sees here and sharing in the UK after participating in the Social Media and the Olympics Panel at Northern Voice here in Vancouver.

Sochi 2016

Residents of Sochi will enjoy the benefits of social media for community discourse from early days of their Games as they received a Knight News Challenge of $600,000 to use for:

“… the latest online tools to both discuss and influence the impact of the games. A web site and database will allow the community to track and debate how the plans are changing life there over a five-year period. The idea is to help residents better prepare for the Olympics, to inform the media about the city’s issues and to use discussions about the games as a way to improve life in Sochi.” A notable achievement to celebrate by – props to young Fulbright scholar, Alexander Zolotarev – and I hope i can help out!

Strong, Free, Social

Michealle Jean and Sam Sullivan Oslo flag ceremony

While some are quick to polarize attitudes about the Games into pro or con,  I am convinced that embracing a variety of opinions about the Olympix events is of significant value. While IOC and VANOC policies may be sources of personal frustration, by documenting the people’s history of the arts, sports and civic issues around Vancouver, we can effectuate positive change in our community and pass on knowledge for future events.

With this spirit in mind, the True North Media House campaign encourages social media education, aggregation and collaboration. My cohorts and I assembled a toolkit of practical resources to help find, tell, and share stories:


Stellar Work!
The lads behind With Glowing Hearts – the Movie demonstrate the importance using creative art to document the social transitons and civic landscape which otherwise go under-noticed. Their ongoing film project includes a segment about the True North Media House evolution which Scales also discusses at Vancouver Access.

Good Idea! Like predictive back-to-school essays, some of my cohorts have published posts about how they will spend their Olympics – consider doing the same. Meet: John Biehler, John Bollwitt, Rebecca Bollwitt, Duane Storey plus the crew at Vancouver Access 2010 who are providing epic info resources for fans and props to event mapmaker 2010VanFan AKA Andrea.

Hang your @

Speaking to Fresh Media at W2Need a place to plug-in? You can meet like-minded doppelgangers at several physical facilites – each with a distinct point of view and requirements including:

Need a place to publish your work? Find an online community which suits your tastes like: Vancouver Observer, Now Public, Orato, Rabble.ca, Media Co-Op /Dominion or roll your own blog, set up Twitter, Flickr and Vimeo accounts to season, and you’re rolling.

Best Social Practices

Outside VANOC Worldwide press briefing

There is a huge difference between sticking your content on Facebook and sharing it for the public enjoyment and archiving. Without giving your the full “Web2.0” manifesto, here are three critical steps to maximizing the reach and longevity of your creations.

  • Publish your work Creative Commons – this alternative copyright framework allows you to give permission for non-commercial use with conditions of attribution and share-alike-ness (CC on Flickr)
  • Tag it specific, tag it general – tags are meant to increase findability – i’ll use #van2010 for all Olympics related content and tags for community-specific awareness e.g.: #vo2010 #tnmh + track in HootSuite so I see everything</plug>
  • Share it to last – don’t hide your content and expect your work to live on, instead, publish content across multiple sites including Wikimedia commonsArchive.org


It will get Weird

Don Cherry wears my hat in SLC

No matter what you think now, expect mind to expand and evolve as you find some inspiration or motivation which you never previously considered.

Perhaps, you’ll discover the notion to express yourself or find new co-conspirators to create a new reality or play a role in helping others explore the places you pass each day.

If not, methinks you’ve missed out on the biggest chance for international fellowship since Expo 86 – and whether you plan to celebrate, protest or observe, you now have the ability and opportunity to contribute to the public record.

So, what do you plan to contribute to the future?

Photo Credits:

Canadian fans – Dave Olson

Roland, Ross and Dave – Rachel Ashe

Ski Jump – Dave Olson

Media Badge – John Biehler

Claudia Pechstein on drums – Dave Olson

Roland, Ross and Dave 2 – Brad Rees via Dave Olson

Seahorse Snacks – Kris Krug

Duff Gibson & medal – Dave Olson

Scales, Maih and Krug – Via Andy Miah

Governor General and Mayor – Dave Olson

Dave and Nadia at Fresh Media – John Bollwitt

Protest Sign – Dave Olson

Don and Ron – Dave Olson

Arriving w/ Gassy Jack and Goaler’s Mews: Commute 8