Tag Archives: hemp ed

A few notes on Saunas from Hemp Ed …

SOOTHING SAUNAS AND STEAM ROOMS

If you want to kick it up another notch and raise health benefits to the next level, visit the sauna or steam room following a workout at the local gym. The intense heat stimulates blood circulation near the skin, which triggers more intense sweating, and you may easily shed a pint or more of sweat — along with accompanying fats and toxins — even in a short stay. Saunas and steam rooms are both good for you, though they tend to impact the body in slightly differing ways. According to Dr. Stengler, saunas and steam rooms help wastes exit out through sweat and sebaceous glands. In the end, which you choose is largely a matter of personal taste. Here’s what you can expect from the various options…

1. Steam rooms provide moist heated air.

2.Traditional European-style saunas provide dry and then wet heat when you splash water on hot rocks or a stove to generate steam).

3. Electric saunas provide only dry heat.

Benefits of intense heat and sweating in steam rooms and saunas include flushing of dirt and debris from the skin… general detoxification… pain relief from conditions such as arthritis, backaches and sports injuries by increasing blood circulation and removing accumulated pain-causing acidic metabolites… stress reduction, and an overall sense of relaxation and well-being.

NEW KID ON THE BLOCK: INFRARED SAUNAS

Dr. Stengler also told me about a relatively new alternative — far infrared saunas. These special saunas harness infrared radiation to heat the skin without warming the air. An infrared sauna usually consists of a wooden box with several infrared heaters, with the box offering the atmosphere of the traditional sauna while heaters emit the actual radiation. People who are fans of infrared radiation point out that it offers the same health benefits as conventional alternatives, but with certain advantages. For example, traditional steam rooms and saunas may be more likely to spread germs because of the moist air, and some people have trouble breathing in air that is very warm. On the other hand, many people enjoy the sensations of relaxation and well-being they more typically associate with sweating out toxins in warm and/or moist air. Once again, it’s a matter of personal preference. Just be careful to avoid over cooking yourself with the penetrating radiant heat.

SAFE SWEATING IN THE SAUNA

Of course, there’s a right way and a wrong way to go about using saunas and steam rooms. To safely sweat your way to good health, Dr. Stengler recommends…

* If you are pregnant, or if you suffer high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes or other chronic health problems, check with your physician first. Intense heat makes your heart pump faster and raises your pulse rate by 30% to 50%.
* Don’t visit the steam room or sauna if you’re not feeling well, or if you’ve been drinking alcohol, and leave at once if you begin to feel nauseous, dizzy or otherwise unwell. Those on medications should check with their doctor before using a sauna or steam room. You should also avoid wearing jewelry when inside, so it does not get damaged.
* Drink water before and afterward — 12 ounces for every 15 minutes in a sauna — and continue to sip water while inside. Dr. Stengler adds that an electrolyte solution would be even better, and that more effective versions than the usual Gatorade are available from health food stores. Also be sure to have plenty of salt in your system as well, especially if on medication or if you are prone to low blood sodium (a blood test can tell you if you are). Even a short session can result in significant fluid and salt loss, and you don’t want to become dehydrated or sodium deficient.
* Keep it short and sweet. A general rule of thumb is 10 to 15 minutes in the steam room or 20 to 30 minutes in the dry sauna once or twice a week. Dr. Stengler adds that these numbers really depend on individual health, and healthy people can safely stretch their stays to 15 to 20 minutes in the steam room and as long as 60 to 90 minutes (with cooling off breaks every 15 minutes) in the dry sauna and 30 minutes (with a 15-minute break halfway through) in the infrared sauna. Conversely, people with conditions such as high blood pressure will need to keep sessions shorter. When in doubt, consult your physician for advice. Whether you go low-tech with just exercise or high-tech (if relaxing in the sauna can be high-tech) with saunas and steam, sweating is one simple and effective way to contribute to health and fitness. As always, just be sure you go about it safely.

“Hemp Ed” Chronicling the Good Fight ~ Originally in Heads Magazine Tokes on the Porch blog

Note: Originally appeared in (now-defunct) Heads Magazine in “Uncle Weed’s Tokes on the Porch” blog —  March 12, 2007 (cached)

Bonus: A podcast i recorded with Ed back in the day: Bacon, Biscuits and Hemp Ed – Choogle on #39

I recently rolled down for a visit to Pe Ell, Washington to see my old amigo Hemp Ed.  Pe Ell is dang near the smallest town you’ve seen  – a former logging boom town and now a fading enclave of approx 619 folks, a bar, a cafe, a store, a gas station, a post office, a school, one part-time cop.

I’ve worked with Ed on hemp activism and advocacy projects since the mid 90’s when public policy seemed to be trended towards decriminalization of recreational cannabis and legalization of industrial hemp as Hemp Lobby.  This venerable website is a bit stale but is now enhanced with Ed’s blogging efforts on Hemp Lobby Chronicles where Ed is blogging up a storm with his candid and thoughtful discourse on public policy, agriculture, energy and the ill-fated “war on drugs.”

Dave & Ed again
Dave & Ed in Oly

Back in the day … We set up an office and library in Olympia Washington and outreached to state legislators, community groups, media and the like with quality materials and polite dialouge.

Notably, in an effort to educate policy-makers, researchers and agriculturalists, Hemplobby created a booklet called “Practical Guide to Cannabis.”  Within are excerpts from many research studies, legislative bills, growing guides and various discourse on hemp policy. We distributed this tome physically and electronically around the world.

Ed’s experience working as a logger for a clearcut operator speaks loudly. He is a wild-eyed libertarian and  grows and raises much of his own food, watches CSPAN compulsively and loves to talk about wild times in Alaska.  I enjoy his rambles even more than his handmade cedar sauna out back.

When I first met Ed, he was touring the country attending events and concerts in the Hemp Education van, a beastly panel van loaded up with hemp samples, sellables and info to share.  He also marketed a woven hemp necklace/pendant thing called an Enviro-eye and sources raw hemp materials for all sorts of industries.

Hemp Ed van

Ed was a founding member of the Hemp Industries Association, the industry’s largest trade group, and was involved in many groups supporting industrial hemp but not medicinal or recreational use. But, like me, he is annoyed at the organizations who are looking down their noses at the uncouthness of recreational herbal enthusiasts.

While I, acutely aware of the societal, agricultural and commercial differences are between cannabis’ varied genus, I am also aware of the prejudice and obstruction techniques “the man” uses to bring the momentum to a crawl.

E.g. … Finally, the DEA vs HIA lawsuit was resolved (effectively re-allowing imported hemp food products into the US more readily), but then the comes the $3000 application process to begin the process of inquiring if you can grow hemp.  The Vote Hemp folks are seeking to test the effectiveness of the newest red-tape brigade by applying and challenging any negative result. But I can’t see a result for some time indeed.  Makes you wanna holler!

While testing the rule of law in laborious court battles (coupled with the drama and diligence required to fundraise to cover expenses) is a noble fight for some, it is not my calling.