Tag Archives: Law & Public Policy

70 years of failed cannabis prohibition in USA

Hemp farmers

Thanks to Hemp Ed in Pe Ell who reminds us that everyone should take note of the significance of Oct. 2nd.

Indeed, October 2, 2006 was the dubious anniversary of 70 years hassle when unemployed Colorado laborer Samuel R. Caldwell was arrested for selling two marijuana cigarettes to Moses Baca and became the first federal marijuana arrest. For his crime, he was sentenced to four years of hard labor at Leavenworth Penitentiary, plus a $1,000 fine.

Hemp Ed says, “This was a bad day for America, and has lead to the arrest and incarceration of 10 of millions of Americans, and opened the door to far more reaching invasive laws into all our freedoms. When will the madness end?”

Not anytime soon it seems as 2006 set a new high (heh) for cannabis arrests. NORML kicks down some opinion and factoids in a stylish chart documenting the debacle.

Allen St. Pierre, NORML Executive Director {give Mr. St Pierre a ring at (202) 483-5500} concluded in NORML’s report: “Crimes of Indiscretion: Marijuana Arrests in the United States,” that:

“Enforcing marijuana prohibition costs taxpayers between $10 billion and $12 billion annually and has led to the arrest of nearly 20 million Americans. Nevertheless, some 94 million Americans acknowledge having used marijuana during their lives. It makes no sense to continue to treat nearly half of all Americans as criminals for their use of a substance that poses no greater – and arguably far fewer – health risks than alcohol or tobacco. A better and more sensible solution would be to tax and regulate cannabis in a manner similar to alcohol and tobacco.”

MARIJUANA ARRESTS BY YEAR
US Marijuana Arrests 1965-2006

Producer of Marihuana tax stamp.Obligatory Wikipedia snippet from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1937_Marihuana_Tax_Act

In the United States, the 1937 Marihuana Tax Act, Pub. 238, 75th Congress, 50 Stat. 551 (Aug. 2, 1937), was one of the cornerstone bills that led to the criminalization of cannabis. It was introduced to U.S. Congress by Harry Anslinger, then Commissioner of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics.

The act did not itself criminalize the possession or usage of cannabis, but levied a tax equaling roughly one dollar on anyone who dealt commercially in marijuana. It did, however, include penalty provisions. Violations of proper procedure could result in a fine of up to $2000 and five years’ imprisonment. The net effect was to make it too risky for anyone to deal in the substance.

 

Canadian Legion threatens White Poppies for Peace folks

White poppies for peaceThis is a case of copyright gone wild. The Peace Pledge Union based in the UK sell white poppies to citizens around the world who wish to show their abhorance and refusal to support war for any purpose. You can read more back story about the white poppies and red poppies for that matter at Remembrance Day Activities in Vancouver.

But the Canadian Legion decided it owned the rights to sell poppies of any kind or colour and threathened the peaceniks with legal action. However, they aren’t giving up and surrendering to the bully who is claiming an absurd trademark right though a Canadian supplier has been forced to stop selling the wee plastic mementos.

Here’s Peace Pledge’s quick overview:Cenotaph in Vancouver

Last year The Royal Canadian Legion through it legal representative demanded that Canadian groups stop distribution them and that the PPU stop making white poppies available in Canada, or else. That was the gist, though expressed in more formal language. According to the RCL’s legal representatives, the white poppy infringes the Legion’s poppy trademark. The PPU replied at length; our central point was that we disagreed with their argument. We have not heard from them since but the Canadian shop at the centre of this complaint regrettably had to acquiesce. You can read more about this at http://tinyurl.com/2mc7pq where you can also find out about the white poppy project and the PPU.

Following the legal threats both the promoters in Canada and Canadians who bought the poppy from us hoped that white poppies would again be available in Canada this year.

White poppies in any quantity are available from us for dispatch anywhere in the world including Canada.

In case you missed it, i recorded a spoken word podcast series based around the White Poppies i received last year and my brother’s involvement in the conflict in Iraq (now home safe – wish i could say the same for the rest). Still one more episode to go – trying to get it all done in less than a year ;-).

You can also subscribe to Postcards from Gravelly Beach in iTunes.

Be sure to order white poppies early (shipped across the Atlantic) and read the loquacious discourse on this most critical of topics. Make no mistake, the way to honour ultimate sacrifice is to ensure no such future bloodshed is required from man’s inability to get along. And we (all of us) have a right to respect the fallen in a manner which suits our conscience and not a method prescribed by the Legion or anyone else.

Honor by not fighting“The power of the white poppy lies in its questioning of the dominant – and fundamentally dishonest – view of war. More than that, it carries the hopes and demands of the mothers, wives, daughters and girlfriends of the men who for whatever reason and in whatever way were diminished by their participation in war. Their hope was that we would find less brutal social institutions to solve problems and resolve conflict. It remains for us to fulfill the wish.”

US/CAN border line-ups – BC to Washington cameras

Borders are a drag and I often travel o’er the USA/Canada territorial line in the sand via Peace Arch, Pacific (aka Truck) or Lynden cause sitting in a long border line is an exercise in boredom and inefficiency.

I always mean to add these hand resources, so here they are: cameras, wait times, back routes and more.

http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/general/times/menu-e.html

http://www.borderlineups.com/

http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/traffic/border/

Rearview Mirror at the border with Hand
photo Lee LeFever

Baseball, Birthdays, Fireworks, Transit, Grateful Dead, Creative Commons and Geek Fests

Dan resting on Ice Throne

Twas my brother Funboy’s birthday as well as Jerry Garcia‘s birthday, so i took a half-dayer to go see a Vancouver Canadians game at the tuned-up Nat Bailey stadium (and saw the curling rink under construction nearby).

jerry garcia stuff

The ballclub didn’t answer my request for free tix (since i am big shot sports podcaster and all) but the $8/ea. didn’t kill me. Beers $6 – choice of Granville Island Pale or Lager (Pale is better methinks).

The baseball game vs. Everett Aqua Sox featured sloppy defense, a grand slam, many runs, a big comeback and a loss to the homers in extra innings. The park is much improved with art, paint and moved in fences. The treed backdrop is a classic. The blogging Bollwits (Miss 604 and AudiHertz) were there too working on tans/burns while waiting for hockey season to start.

Miss 604 talked tenderly of their relations 99% of Champions over at Duane’r the drinkin’ codr’s blog (featuring crazy hyper-real HDR photos) and discourse on appropriate use under CC – Creative Commons, Flickr and You.

I’ll see them all at the upcoming Vancouver BAR Camp – which has something to do with drinking but not much to do about a bar per se. Unconference geekfest is what it is. Bring your own idea and $20 if you want a shirt (i don’t). I have a big idea i had best get writing about. – the Urban Vancouver TV Show – i have a smaller idea too … a “let’s write Wikipedia entries for one another’s companies/personalbrand” kinda powwow – signup! to participate in some documentary activity – while carefully avoiding conflict of interest.

Also coming up is Gnomedex (though my upcoming agenda is nothing like Krugger’s madcamp geek tour with Scales the international man of mysterious skills. Whenever i think of Gnomedex, (I’ll try not to tear up here, sniff, sniff) I think about the outstanding people i meet there (followed by the fine food and great partying), notably my amigos from Bryght who are *always* ready to brew up some activity no matter the topic as long as it touches on how tech effects the human social condition.

Though Gnomedex is gratefully not on Canada Day this year, there will be a strong Canadian vibe with Darren Barefoot and Derek K Miller making contributions. Bowen Island’s Boris always has something to say the boris wishes to speak + ace technologist Roland (who did an interview with Len Edgerly that is worth a listen) who was such a mighty force for citizen media goodness during the Canucks playoff run.

I am also eager to hear Rand Fishkin – an SEO wiz from Seattle – I follow that kinda search stuff somewhat for my day-job.

Another Bryght guy Richard Eriksson is posting up a nice variety of topics i care about (and his subtle sense of humor cuts through the cutesy-asian decor ;-)): podcasting, bc transit and asking people to do stuff for ya.

I commented on his recent list of podcasts he listens to (thankfully including the Canucks Outsider (hosted by Bryght) but seems I haven’t enticed him to subscribe to the Choogle on or Postcards from Gravelly Beach feeds yet (acquired taste i suppose).

Anyhow, I commented about Cory Doctorow (who i go on and on about him in The Totalitarian Urge on Now Public from his spiel at SFU) (he also spoke at Gnomedex 05)’s podcast, Craphound podcast. In particular Cory’s recent lecture at UC Irvine talk on copyright and trade policy episode is brilliant commentary – so good i listened twice while rolling on tranist. Decent audio quality too (many audience recordings are well intentioned but hardly listenable) – maybe Cory could bring an M-Audio Microtrack and a decent mic and non-bootleg his own lectures for the Craphound podcast?

cory doctorow at sfu vancouver Anyhow, here’s what i had to say about Cory on Richard’s Podcasts, In Various States of ‘Listened-to’ and ‘Unlistened-to’ (easier just to paste cause i am at work yo!):

I would add a hearty recommendation for Cory Doctorow’s Craphound podcast. His feed includes a weekly show with him catching up on his exploits and then reading from his or someone else’s book – currently Bruce Sterling’s critical tome “The Hacker Crackdown” plus bakes in his various interviews at colleges, universities, radioshows, writer groups, etc. He is wicked smart on a wide variety of topics from global economics to quantum physics.

If there is a Cory Doctorow fan club, i wouldn’t join it, i’d make my own using the creative commons fan club license and then give away memberships (which do not require providing names or other identifying info) and then send the non-records to space in a Buckley’s cold medicine powered time capsule.

Of course Cory talks much about Copyright/Creative commons and how to bridge that into a business model (again some KK talks about with his fashion photography). One underused example (which i brought up on Roland’s Dogma Radio a while ago) of community driven, non-fascist, conscious capitalism business model in the creative space is the aforementioned Grateful Dead. They were successful both artistically and financially to say the least.

They ran their own label (with varying degrees of success), promoted on tours and produced dozens of spin-offs with different bands (JGB, Ratdog, Mystery Box, Phil and Friends …) before and after Jerry’s demise. Most importantly, they allowed fans to record shows resulting in a comprehensive musical record of their long, strange trip. The tapes could be traded but not sold. The anti-Metallica.

jerry and lads (and barn)

Use of band photos got a bit more dubious as did non-licensed t-shirts, … at some venues, security thugs would take offense and seize merchandise for sale (or hassle the people using the “donation” excuse) but this wasn’t necessarily the view of the band, instead overzealous promoters etc. but that’s a different story …

Grateful Dead was the first Internet search i did when i got online in Guam. Jerry had just died and at the impromptu candlelight vigil, i met some guys who had all the low-down on how and where, why etc. … this info was hard to source in a distant rock … turned out they worked for the largest Micronesian newspaper and had the Internet. Whoa dude. The Internet.

bob and dave at starsand private beach club, guam, circa 1995 The local Guam ISP offered a “learn how to Internet” class and after learning about Trumpet Winsock and Gopher, I loaded up Dead.net over the 14.4kbps modems thousands away from any servers or backbone … then the power went out (brown tree snakes often curl up and gnaw at the lines resulting in a dead snake and spontaneous bar-b-ques to use up thawing meats).

Anyhow, I am now Uncle Weed at the all-new, wicked shiny and deluxe drupal-ized Dead.net.

Lots to do here: mark shows you attended for starters and explore the careful documentation of each setlist over a mighty history. Roll yer own account and hook up with people you actually have something in common with – collect photos of shows you were at, share ones you got, stoke out your show collection and indulge in reminiscing about veggie burritos, buses fulla hippie chicks and scarfing Samuel Smith’s Oatmeal Stout and oranges after a 3-1/2 hours show in some state you’ve never been before (mentally and physically). Highest ratings indeed.

Grteful Dead at Shoreline Aug 16 1991
(Dead lot in Shoreline Amphitheatre – August 16, 1991 – think that’s my Earthship in the center)
Photo by

Finally, I started in on a lengthy spiel about local transit (i wanna love transit, i really do) inspired in part by the dialogue around Dave Olsen’s Tyee series about Free Transit and Darren Barefoot’s gutcheck reply and partly because my inefficient commute from North Van to the Cambie and Broadway conflagration.Rolling Transit Museum

In the meantime, here is a couple of comments i left at Paying for ‘Free’ Transit which will suffice – for the time being at least.

Part One:

The “other Dave Olson” here chiming in with another example of free transit.

Indeed my (almost doppleganger) Dave Olsen was wise to look outside the country for positive examples of transit in action which can be found in the oddest of places.

While free transit (and quality transit in general) is oft looked at as a leftie-liberal utopian dream and conservative are wont to roll eyes and think of transit as the transport of the destitute and lazy, the “most conservative” city in America (that I’ve found anyhow) rolls the free buses and manages to do it clean and happily. Really.

Logan, Utah – where the hair is big and the trucks are bigger – is a university town (Utah State has 20K+ students) with only 2 bars (both closed on Sundays), a gleaming Mormon temple, a row of box stores, malls and fast food that even Surrey would envy, almost no crime and a massive police force (i know first hand ;-)).

There is little/no ecological bent whatsoever – the kids still rev engines and cruise Main on Saturday night and recycling means eating leftover casserole. Yet these hard-sells bought into free transit and – from the parents to the drinkers – love it. Go there and ask.

Part Two

While I think free transit is a hard sell here, I would settle for a few improvements like clean buses (both exhaust and interior), customer-friendly drivers (I am talking to you on the 15!), and schedules posted at each stop (shelter would be nice too, it does rain here Virginia).

A little tinkering with technology would go a long way for the rider’s experience too – i.e. a website with some semblance of usability and SMS “next bus” service (some SFU students are doing this I believe). Realtime announcements at stops (like in London) would be nice too but I won’t hold my breath.

As for price, a roll back of fares which make it more affordable to ride than drive for starters. Say a loonie a ride. Now, if I wanna take the wife and boy downtown and back, I can roll transit for about $20 or drive for $3 of gas + pay to park and still come out ahead (I do roll transit anyhow despite being packed shoulder to shoulder with wet strangers whilst bounding across Lion’s Gate).

Also, as a monthly pass buyer, I do not understand the erstwhile availability limits (imagine my audacity trying to get a pass on July 2nd! Took 4 stops to find one) and the “discounted” faresavers are a joke too.

Finally (rant almost done – more on my blog) enough testing and thinking about it already – Get some new buses! We are often riding the same decaying sleds as we did in the 1980s when Vancouver was deemed North America’s best transit system. Well it ain’t now.

For the record, i grew up in Whalley (well before Skytrain) and the 316/312 was my escape pod from a crappy Jr. Secondary school to my beloved downtown. I ride transit 2-3 hours a day now and visited the rolling transit museum (geeky I know). I also own a car which i use for roadtrip – and the traditional bi-annual trip to Ikea of course.

I’ve traveled to 20+ countries and ride public conveyance most everywhere I go from Guam to Japan to Amsterdam and beyond. Translink needs help fast in order cease ghettoizing the humble and noble transit rider who should be celebrated not passed-by (like i was this morning while heading to the instersection of chaos of Cambie and Broadway … but that’s another rant, one about rider safety!).

This weekend will involve a visit to the Powell Street Festival celebrating Japanese Canadian culture plus the fireworks finale on Saturday which we’ll watch from the semi-secret spot. The Province has a (rare) good article about Vancouver’s Top Ten hikes, swims, paddles, skateparks etc. which is worth keeping handy in your ‘stuff to do’ stash.

This weekend is also Pride weekend in Vancouver so don’t be surprised at all the buttless chaps (not to be confused with the world naked bike ride last week). BTW, we cannabis legalization advocates could learn a lot about “coming out” from the queerfolk.

Finally, finally … a few shots from a quick trip to Dundarave to watch China’s go at the fireworks – the sightlines were as great for photos this time but China’s show was top notch as you’d likely expect.

Chinese Fireworks in Vancouver from Dundarave Chinese Fireworks in Vancouver from Dundarave Chinese Fireworks in Vancouver from Dundarave Chinese Fireworks in Vancouver from Dundarave

Washington State Updates Medical Cannabis Law

From CannabisMD.org comes this excerpt from SB 6032 – a bill to clarify some ambiguity in the existing Medical Marijuana law. A situation i’ve followed closely for many years while sabres rattle and protestors get rained on – endless debates and rallies with painfully slow progress.

I recall a rally on the Capitol steps in 1996/7 when the momentun and public opinion suggested that we were on the brink of some major freedoms in this erstwhile campaign. I was filming The HempenRoad and Dennis Peron was fresh off big victory in California (where is he now?) and Ralph Seely was fighting tough as cancer ravaged his body. Robert Lunday was there youthful and focused (pause). So much energy for such a simple and harmless treatment. There is simply not a toxic level to this plant (trust me, i would’ve found it by now).

As a dude with chronic GI tract problems and dozens of doctor’s visits (homeopathic, acupuncuture, chinese herbs, allopathic, specialists galore) as a result, i reckon i qualify in the expanded list of “acceptable ailments.” Also noteworthy is the police not being liable for not seizing stash so not more of that “i was just following orders” excuse and doctors and caregivers being specifcally removed from hassles – i am not so naive to think that this will be a smooth ride but (some of) the compassion clinics in California show it can be done discretely and honestly and legally.

Alas, workplaces are not required to provide a place for patients to use thier herb but i know a few Washington businesses which already do ;-).

Excerpts follow:


May 8, 2007, Washington Governor Christine Gregoire signed Senate Bill 6032, an amendment to The Medical Use of Marijuana Act of 1998, originally filed by Dr. Rob Killian, (back row in white shirt) physician of Martin Martinez, (far right) the Seattle man who claimed “medical necessity” at trial in 1996 and 1997.

More photos here
News articles here
Support letters here

MEDICAL MARIJUANA IN WASHINGTON STATE

Excerpts from SB 6032:

Sec. 1. The legislature intends to clarify the law on medical marijuana so that the lawful use of this substance is not impaired and medical practitioners are able to exercise their best professional judgment in the delivery of medical treatment, qualifying patients may fully participate in the medical use of marijuana, and designated providers may assist patients in the manner provided by this act without fear of criminal prosecution. This act is also intended to provide clarification to law enforcement and to all participants in the judicial system.

Sec. 2. The people of Washington State find that some patients with terminal or debilitating illnesses, under their physician’s care, may benefit from the medical use of marijuana. Qualifying patients with terminal or debilitating illnesses who, in the judgment of their physician, may benefit from the medical use of marijuana, shall not be found guilty of a crime under state law for their possession and limited use of marijuana;
Persons who act as designated providers to such patients shall also not be found guilty of a crime under state law for assisting with the medical use of marijuana; and
Physicians shall also be excepted from liability and prosecution for the authorization of marijuana use to qualifying patients for whom, in the physician’s professional judgment, medical marijuana may prove beneficial.

Legal use of medical marijuana:

Terminal or debilitating medical conditions that qualify for the use of medical marijuana include: cancer, HIV, MS epilepsy, intractable pain unrelieved by standard treatments, Glaucoma unrelieved by standard treatments, Crohn’s disease unrelieved by standard treatments, Hepatitis C unrelieved by standard treatments, anorexia, and diseases with symptoms of wasting, appetite loss, cramping, seizures, muscle spasms, or spasticity, when those symptoms are unrelieved by standard treatments.

Licensed physicians shall be excepted from the state’s criminal laws and shall not be penalized in any manner, or denied any right or privilege, for advising a qualifying patient about the risks and benefits of medical marijuana or that the qualifying patient may benefit from the use of medical marijuana, or for providing a qualifying patient with valid documentation that the medical use of marijuana may benefit that patient.

A qualifying patient is a person who has been diagnosed with a terminal or debilitating medical condition by a licensed physician who has advised them on risks and benefits and recommended that he or she may benefit by the use of medical marijuana. A qualifying patient must possess valid documentation. Valid documentation includes a copy of a document signed by the physician, or a copy of the patient’s pertinent medical records stating that, in the physician’s professional opinion, the patient may benefit from the medical use of marijuana. The patient must also possess proof of identity such as a Washington state driver’s license or identicard.

A designated provider is a person who is at least 18 years of age and who has been designated to possess medical marijuana in writing by a qualified patient, and must also possess a Washington state driver.s license or identicard. A designated provider may not consume the marijuana he or she may possess for the use of the qualified patient, and must be “the designated provider to only one patient at any one time.”

A qualified patient or designated provider must present valid documentation to police upon demand, and must possess no more marijuana than necessary for the patient’s personal medical use, not exceeding the amount necessary for a sixty-day period. When an officer determines that a patient or designated provider qualifies under this chapter the officers may document the amount in possession, and they may take a relative sample for testing, “but not seize the marijuana”. Law enforcement officers cannot be held liable for failure to seize medical marijuana.

A qualifying patient under 18 years of age may engage in the medical use of marijuana with a doctor’s recommendation, however, production, acquisition, and dosage determinations shall be the responsibility of that patient’s parent or legal guardian.

If charged with a violation of state law relating to marijuana, a qualifying patient or a designated provider who assists a qualifying patient in the medical use of marijuana will have established an affirmative defense to such charges by proof of compliance with the requirements of this chapter.

Limitations:

It is a misdemeanor to use or display medical marijuana in a manner or place open to the view of the general public.

A health insurance provider cannot be held liable for claims of reimbursement for the medical use of marijuana.

A physician is not required to authorize the medical use of marijuana for a patient afflicted with a terminal or debilitating condition.

Places of employment, educational centers, correctional facilities, and other public places are not required to provide on-site accommodations for qualifying patients to use medical marijuana.

It is a class C felony to fraudulently produce any record purporting to be, or to tamper with the content of any record for the purpose of having it accepted as valid documentation.

The affirmative defense shall be denied to any person engaged in the medical use of marijuana in a way that endangers the health or well-being of any person through the operation of a motorized vehicle on a street, road, or highway.

Determinations:

The Medical Quality Assurance Commission in consultation with the Board of Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery, or other appropriate agency as designated by the governor, shall accept for consideration petitions submitted to add terminal or debilitating conditions to those currently included in this chapter. Consideration of additional medical conditions shall include public notice and a public hearing upon such petitions. Final determinations may be subject to judicial appeal.

The Department of Health shall adopt rules defining the quantity of marijuana that could reasonably be presumed to be a sixty day supply for qualifying patients. This presumptive determination may be overcome with evidence of a qualifying patient’s necessary medical use. The Department of Health shall make a good faith effort to include all stakeholders identified in the rule-making analysis.

The Department of Health shall gather information from medical and scientific literature, from consulting with experts and the public and by reviewing the best practices of other states regarding access to an adequate, safe, consistent, and secure source, including alternate distribution systems, of medical marijuana for qualifying patients.

The Department of Health shall report these findings to the state Legislature by July 1st, 2008.

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Rick Steves – Europhile and travel-activist kicking down the tolerance

I am a huge fan of travel guru and noted nice guy, Rick Steves. He started with great books (Europe Through the Back Door) after traveling around Europe working as a piano tuner. Now, he’s all over PBS TV and Radio and his radio shows are now podcasted. He is totally in me “hero file.” Not only did build a kind and gracious empire promoting travel, good times and friendship from Edmonds, WA but he is also an outspoken and noble endorser of cannabis use and tolerance and chillaxing in general. He is now a member of the Norml advisory board and his ‘regular American dorky dad’ persona is just what ‘regualr dorky Americans’ need to see to push the cannabis bogey man image out of their minds.

I could go on and on but i was eager to let you know that his podcasts are getting better and better and these two (along with one about Prague i listened to this morning) are great examples. Not just ‘which hotel to stay in’ but real global/local minded discourse on the thoughts and customs which make us humans rather intriguing. The contrast (fairly unintentional) between Netherland’s noble aloofness and the cubicle-bound American makes for great listening and his recounting of the Road to Santiago is a treat with behind the scenes thoughts about ‘why’ along with the ‘wheres and hows.’

Anyhow, here are a few links to smoke errr. digest:Rick on Amsterdam’s Coffeeshops

Decriminalization of Marijuana

Europe Through an Open Door (interview)

Among the groups that Steves, a Christian who’s active in the Lutheran Church, supports are Bread for the World, Greenpeace, and NORML, which advocates the decriminalization of marijuana. His trips to Holland, he says, have shown him there are more compassionate and sane policies for managing marijuana use and prostitution.

Rick on Social Activism

So subscribe to Rick’s podcast ye mateys and/or grab a couple of samples below.

Dutch Tolerance and The Overworked American Airdate: April 28, 2007

Rick chats with tour guide Ton Van Garderen from The Netherlands about how Amsterdam makes its “live and let live” libertine policies work andwhat’s behind the Dutch reputation for being “tolerant.”

We’llalso assess the state of the overworked American with author and documentary producer John DeGraff to see how we can reclaim some of the time we never seem to have enough of.

Additional Links:

John Degraff’s website: www.timeday.org

Pilgrimage on El Camino de Santiago in Spain, Tourism in Iran

Airdate: March 31, 2007

We learn about El Camino de Santiago de Compostela from a man who takes tourists on updated versions of this medieval pilgrimage route and catch up with a Lonely Planet Iran researcher who finds that, despite the country’s heavy-handed rulers, the Iranian people are some of the most welcoming you’ll find anywhere. Plus we have a new round of listeners’ travel haiku to share.

Additional Links:

Note: I am fascinated by the Camino de Santiago where pilgrims walk for thousands of miles to get near the (alleged) bones of St. James as we learned arriving their the day the Pope JP2 died. The next day were impromptu parades and masses at the giant cathedral (my first Catholic mass too). I did a wee bit of writing a few painting too – maybe i’ll finish them sometime – here’s a photo in the meantime.

Rick Steves Europe: Travel with Rick Steves: Program Archives