Tag Archives: seabus

Vancouver’s SeaBus, Uncle Weed’s Annotated Voyage

Social on the Seabus ~ A wee lil piece of HootSuite edutainment

Recdenlty for my day -job we hopped abord my fave form of convenyance and talked a few socoal media tips and..

HEre’s the blog post to got iwht “Social Media commutysomething//”

As an aside, here’s a post about riding on the inguageral voayage of the pacific brreeeze:

Vancouver observer / feathsoue

Seabus Voyage: 11 minute crossing of Burrard Inlet on a rainy Vancouver day

The Seabus is a passenger ferry running between downtown Vancouver and North Vancouver across the Burrard Inlet. The crossing generally takes about 11-12 minutes. This video is a simple single shot of the crossing with ambient sound and no alterations.

The Seabus (there are 3: The Otter, and The Beaver, were launched in 1977 and the Pacific Breeze was launched in late 2009 just before the Winter Olympics) are operated by Translink, the transit authority for the greater Vancouver BC area. Many folks ride this daily as part of their commute to work in downtown or even closer, in Gastown or Railtown.

Further Reading on the launch of the Breeze:
http://www.miss604.com/2009/12/new-seabus-pacific-breeze-now-in-operation.html

The dock on the south side is adjacent of the wharves of Canada Place and accessible via Waterfront Station or the Heliport door on the low road. The north dock is in a complex with Lonsdale Quay market — a great tiny alternative to the busy (especially in the summer) Granville Island Market.

Both docks closely connected with other transit modes: at Waterfront, all Skytrain lines and Westcoast Express train; and, busses to all points on the North Shore at Lonsdale Quay (including busses to Grouse Mountain, Deep Cove and Horsehoe Bay).

Tip: Exit via the Heliport door and walk to unknown CRAB park just a few 100 metres away to the east – further east, a bridge connects you to the north end of Main St.

Tip: Ride the Seabus to North Vancouver and catch the 228 bus and ride to Lynn Valley Suspension Bridge. It’s free, unlike Capilano, and it’s not a tourist trap

Dossier in Observer and Olympics in Access

In case you are seeking more writing and musing, I am publishing columns at a couple more Vancouver-based outlets. Check it:

Uncle Weed’s Dossier at Vancouver Observer

Here’s where I’ll mostly write about transportation, vancouver secrets and history, public policy conundrums, cascadian diplomacy and creative activism. Here are the first two dossier about trains and seabus:
With the impending Olympix invasion, February might be a good time to hop the rails and meet your Cascadian neighbors to the south. You may likely find you have more cultural similarities than our…
1977 was a stellar year for culture. The Ramones, The Clash and Bob Marley with classic albums, Elvis for a half-year, plus Star Wars, Saturday Night Fever and the launch of the SeaBus.

Uncle Weed Olympics at Vancouver Access 2010

As for Olympic-related coverage, you can check out the Uncle Weed content on Vancouver Access 2010 – a RainCity Studios fan experience project. Much of the content began on the RainCity Studios site from coverage during Torino06, Beijing08 and lead-up to Vancouver2010 and the True North Media House project.

Festive Greetings to Ice Fishermen – Choogle On #82

Festive Greeting to Ice Fishermen
Photo by John Bollwitt, remixed by Uncle Weed

Festive Greetings to Ice Fishermen – Choogle On #82 (36:57, .mp3)

Shortly after New Year’s Day, Uncle Weed recounts highlights from the passing year including a surprising visit with bong-toting ice fishermen on a frozen neighborhood lake, plus recaps on concerts, spreading messages to media and youth, voting often, speaking out, supporting soldiers and peaceniks, resisting cynicism, researching the painter Varley, publishing literature, sparking coverage of Olympics, making a board game, gallery visits, riding the new SeaBus, remembering ole dead gramps, drinking stout and earl grey tea, and the joys of treading on thin ice.

More:

2009 Highlights and Musings – Art and Diligence

Continue reading Festive Greetings to Ice Fishermen – Choogle On #82

“Riding the Roof of the Breeze” Dossier in The Vancouver Observer

I’ve started a new column at Vancouver Observer, a web-based, hyper-local news site. The Column is called “Uncle Weed’s Dossier” and I’ll mostly write about transportation, Vancouver secrets and history, public policy conundrums, Cascadian diplomacy and creative activism.

Enjoy this first installment from the $3 Harbour Cruise featuring my pal Rebecca Bollwitt with thanks to urban transit explorer JMV.


Photo of this reporter on the SeaBus Bridge by Rebecca Bollwitt.

Here’s an excerpt of Riding the Roof of the Breeze:

1977 was a stellar year for culture. The Ramones, The Clash and Bob Marley with classic albums, Elvis for a half-year, plus Star Wars, Saturday Night Fever and the launch of the SeaBus. Since that banner year, the intrepid lil catamarans have toiled across Burrard Inlet, unheralded and undaunted. Now the two vessels – the Beaver and Otter – are three as the Pacific Breeze set off from Waterfront station Wednesday Dec. 23rd with politicians on-board and me on the roof.

Transit’s Crown Jewel

I’m the guy who did a 4th grade science fair project about transit, rode the long way on buses downtown to punk rock shows and celebrated when the ALRT began (even when it ended in New West). But living in Whalley, the SeaBus was an exotic morsel in the transit offering – i have scant memories outings to the Quay or the free suspension bridge but mostly i remember skipping out of school and riding it just to ride it.

These days, the Seab is my daily ride and my nightly schedule revolves around the run down the gangway into the surreal confines of a hazy crossing in a humming shuttle. Unlike the sway of the bus, the Seab is pod of relaxation and creativity and (the best part) you always get a seat. Indeed, I extol the virtues of the perfect day out in Vancouver on my podcast which includes “the 3 dollar harbour cruise” complete with a falafel and a rainforest stroll – all on one transfer.

Bonus Round

Miss 604 photos from inaugural crossing

Miss 604 coverage
JMV’s sneak preview photos
This reporter on deck

Links

Rolling to the End of the Line – Choogle on #77
I Love Transit Week essay: Dave Olson

Transit science fair project circa 1980

via Riding the Roof of the Breeze | The Vancouver Observer – Vancouver Olympics News Blogs Events Reviews.

The Buzzer blog » Guest post: Vancouver Transit and Art

The Buzzer blog » Guest post: Vancouver Transit and Art

“Rolling to the End of the Line” Transit mixed-media essay on the Buzzer

As part of Translink (the greater Vancouver area transit authority)’s “I Love Transit” week, i was invited by Jhenifer Pabliano to contribute an article about why i love transit. I assembled a mixed-media package to tell my story a few different ways – words, photos, poems, twitters and a podcast (some video coming soon for extra fun).

Here it is for your convenience, here’s: I Love Transit Week essay: Dave Olson

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For I Love Transit Week, I’m happy to share a contribution from Dave Olson, who is a prolific and talented local writer, podcaster, poet, Canucks superfan, and much more. You can find all of his work at uncleweed.net — and here’s some direct links to his blog, notebook, Twitter, and three podcasts: Postcard from Gravelly Beach, Choogle On, and Canucks Outsider.

So without further ado, here is “Rolling to the End of the Line,” an essay about transit by Dave Thorvald Olson.

Escape

Dave's 4th grade science fair project on trolley buses. Photo from Dave's <a href=

Dave’s 4th Grade Sciene Fair Exhibit

Brother Bob and I would mimic the airhorns on the way to elementary school – same as we’d do for truckers and fire trucks, pulling the string down, hoping the bus driver would notice and honk. Seemed like a blast to me, tooling along in those big buses, filled with interesting people coming and going. I’d trace routes around Vancouver maps, then memorized provinces, states and countries – imagining myself at the wheel of some kind of bus. My 4th grade science fair exhibit extolled the wonders of Trolley Transit, complete with the proposed ALRT route traced off in felt pen on a GVRD map plus a stack of Buzzers to give away.

Later, transit became my escape. In the early 80s Vancouver was growing up – so much newness everywhere it seemed, except in my neighbourhood. So buddy Brad and I would skip out errr … wait until after … school and hop the 312 or 316. We’d roll down Kingsway, over an hour all told, to tromp down Granville to Odyssey Imports for records or Black Market for t-shirts. Then maybe skateboard over to that crazy new domed stadium place and hang out on the steps, trying to imagine would Vancouver would look like in 20 years. Then warm up in the law courts or the Vancouver Art Gallery before hopping a bus back home to the ‘burbs.

Exploration

My forays stretched later into night and ventured further afield – wherever there was an all-ages punk show or a sweet girl with busy parents, I’d find a bus route – navigating to shows at the York Theater on Commercial Drive or tracking down some old church or community hall on some route I’d never heard of charted out in a battered paper schedule. I remember missing the last bus to Surrey from downtown and hoofing all the way down Hastings to the PNE to catch another – a long walk in the cold Chuck Taylors before ending up at Whalley Exchange in the wee hours.

Dave's beloved VW bus. Photo from Dave's <a href=

Dave’s beloved VW Microbus

In 1986, Vancouver changed. A lot. The SkyTrain (or Airbus as I preferred) was running for a few years to New West. We’d hop a #319 and whisk downtown on the ALRT in 22 scant minutes for the barrage of international events in shiny teal buildings. Suddenly Vancouver was modern and everyone came to watch. I’d seen most all of Vancouver from Ambleside to Crescent Beach by then, so I got my own bus – a VW camper bus – and set off travelling.

Creation

Twenty-two countries later and countless bus, trains, trolley and trams rides later, I returned and moved high up Lynn Valley – “Just ride the 210 ‘til the driver turns off the engine,” are the instructions to visiting friends. Living on the Baden-Powell trail also means I ride transit – a lot. Currently to Kitsilano – that’s two bridges of patience. But now, I am more prepared – I strap on oversized headphones, grab iPhone for live Twitter updates, snacks in pocket, and travel mug with tasty bevvie. Importantly, a Moleskine notebook, inky pens and an audio recorder in my lunch sack allow me use transit as a creative space.

The Crazy Canucks podcast crew, on the back of a bus! (Dave's at far right). Photo from <a href=

The Crazy Canucks podcast crew, on the back of a bus! (Dave

Creation works best aboard the Seabus – the views stunning, you always get a seat, and if you are waiting, its your fault as the Seabus boasts punctuality the Germans would envy – indeed, “Otto and the Beav” rarely stumble whither windstorms or traffic jams (digression: i was hoping for “Sockeye” rather than “Breeze” for the third vessel’s name).

On my commute and weekend excursions, I mix up the routes for exploration and documenting the curious. I look to old-timers who rode routes toting heavy film cameras just to document the ordinary goings-on on 1930s Vancouver for inspiration. What I see goes into notebooks, snapshots, video clips and audio podcasts – sometime in the back seat recording a Canucks Outsider podcast, riding the SkyTrain end to end for a Choogle on podcast or documenting the SeaBus on Car-free day. Maybe writing freeverse and Twitter updates describing the scenes of life from the transit journey then co-mingling the spectacular and mundane of metropolitan Vangroovy into literary dim sum.

I love you, you’re perfect, now change

change my route to think about the neighbourhoods
March 30, 2007 – Dave Olsoni change my route
from time to time
to think about
the neighbourhoods

switched Cambie 15
for Main Number 3
or Fraser if i don’t mind
cutting across Kingsway

skirted schoolgirls Xavier-bound
headphones, sweaters
in rows

downtown exchanges
spake in broken halts
sometime gleaming
often rain
occasionally sleet, hail or ice

Here are two more transit poems from Dave: The Ferry Changes Tack, and Waiting Only Twice a Day

Aboard these cooperative transport pods are keys to a civil society – you mingle with strangers, you guess their stories, you accidentally eavesdrop on conversations, or hope for the character who amuses you to come on board. Tolerance and translucency abound onboard. For me, I roll with a load of billeted foreign exchange student chattering away in Portuguese, Japanese or practicing English. You begin to notice the same people and sometimes recognize your bus buddies at a store or a bar as “ahhh it’s that guy from the 228″. At least I do.

I tell myself I am helping reduce greenhouse gases and getting one more car of the road, but it ain’t always easy keeping it that way. Like any relationship, me and transit have rifts and differences – ask me about my issues another time. Despite my policy conundrums, I ride because efficient transportation is key to a pleasing living experience for more of us. So the escape, exploration, creative space, collective experience and chance encounters still get me running down the block – with a warm beverage, giant headphones and notebook – to hop aboard, flash my two-zone pass, and say “hello” to the driver while heading for the good seat in the back.

Rolling to the End of the Line ~ Choogle On! #77

Rolling aboard buses, trolleys, Skytrain and Seabus, Uncle Weed discusses changing routes and riding transit for escape, exploration, creativity, inspiration and adds in tourist fun plus concerns about free expression, aggressive security and love for the Seabus in a special documentary dispatch from Upper Lynn Valley to Kitsilano in Vancouver, BC, Canada.

See Rolling to the End of the Line article in at I Love Transit Week essay: Dave Olson series at Buzzer blog (thanks Jhenifer) or “Rolling to the End of the Line” Transit mixed-media essay on the Buzzer at Feasthouse blog.

Hop aboard for Rolling to the End of the Line – Choogle on #77 (.mp3, 28:00, 26MB)

Rolling to the end of the Line

Photos

Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge

as seen in lynn valley - lost pipe

Twitter updates

Transit dimsum via @uncleweed Twitter

Transit freeverse

change my route to think about the neighbourhoods
March 30, 2007

i change my route
from time to time
to think about
the neighbourhoods

switched Cambie 15
for Main Number 3
or Fraser if i don’t mind
cutting across Kingsway

skirted schoolgirls Xavier-bound
headphones, sweaters
in rows

downtown exchanges
spake in broken halts
sometime gleaming
often rain
occasionally sleet, hail or ice

The Crazy Canucks
Photo via Miss604 on Flickr

Subscribe

Grab the Choogle on feed or subscribe Choogle on via iTunes

More Podcast Goodness

Postcards from Gravelly Beach – Literature podcast – FeediTunesBlog

Out n’ About with Uncle Weed– Travelin’ man vidcast – ShowFeediTunes

Ephemeral Feasthouse – Miscellanea & notes – BlogFeedPodcast

Clubside Breakfast Time – OlyWa Rock and Punditry – BlogFeediTunes

Visit

Uncleweed.net for more writings, podcasts, paintings and photos

Follow along via Twitter @uncleweed

Rooftop Transportation Bonanza in Vancouver’s Burrard Inlet

From the roof of 1 Alexander in Vancouver’s Gastown, Richard Eriksson and i observe and riff about transportation methods and other sundry topics including: largest two-way Ferry, Mars Martian Flying Fire Boat, Seabus ($2/3 harbour cruise) with advice for Falafel and Suspension Bridge.