All posts by daveo

Wedding Speech / Dave + Ryoko 4-20 Kekkon-shiki

Wedding Speech, Delivered by Neal Cropper at Rural Caprine Farm, April 21, 2019

(Written by Dave Olson with Neal Cropper)

<Neal> Dear assembled beautiful people, We come together today from all over the world, bridging countries and cultures, to witness the next chapter in an ongoing Okayama love story.

Indeed it was here at this lovely farm that Ryoko and Dave first met. Like all true love, there’s is a completely unique story / this Okayama love story features a drifting painter slash poet and a sunny arborist slash jazz singer finding each other at a friend’s farm at the exact moment that they were both ready to begin this new life.

Since then, the relationship has flourished into one of mutual respect, shared interest, many laughs, and sparking more love each day. Love stories are all different, but the great ones always share a foundation of working together with common interests and passions. In this case, a mutual love of art, music, nature, creativity, compassion, living slow and simple, and building a community of friends.

Continue reading Wedding Speech / Dave + Ryoko 4-20 Kekkon-shiki

Shinto Wedding Vow / Dave + Ryoko 4-20 Kekkon-shiki

Shinto wedding vow, Read by Dave and Ryoko in Unison at Munetade Jinjya (shrine), April 20, 2019

Phoneticized from Japanese by Ryoko (Fujita) Olson Note: copy provided for shrine for convenience of any future non-Japanese literate marriage candidates.

Continue reading Shinto Wedding Vow / Dave + Ryoko 4-20 Kekkon-shiki

Collection: Payphones (vol. 6) – assorted varieties / Japan, etc.

Hello to the people in the future,

What follows are public telephones created in a time when phones did not roam freely and in pockets.

To make a call, one would either enter a specially-created booth (or box), or simply stand close by as the receivers were tethered to the phone unit by a short cord, then insert a variety of coins depending on the location called (local, domestic or international) or in some cases, use a purpose-made phone card, or even a credit card (though doing so often exposed one to fraudulent actors).

Perhaps you have already imagined the unsanitary nature of sharing a phone handset (placed next/close to ear and mouth of course) with strangers – though perhaps this increased “herd immunity” despite being rather unpleasant. Note that oftentimes the coin return slots were checked for forgotten change but the miner was surprised to find discarded chewing gum, or even-less-savoury items, instead.

This gallery is primarily Japan phone – both current working payphones, hotel house phones, house landlines, antique non-working artifacts and one from Indonesia, captured “in the wild”.

note: this one is on a Shinkansen train so one can place a call while traveling 200kmph

Additional volumes of similar collections provide additional examples – both international and domestic (to Canada / USA), as well as additional examples of hotel “house” phones.   Continue reading Collection: Payphones (vol. 6) – assorted varieties / Japan, etc.

Checklist for Party / Dave + Ryoko 4-20 Kekkon-shiki

Checklist, various tasks

チェックリスト Checklist

 

  • Make a name badge 名前入りバッジを作る
  • Take an insta-photo インスタ写真を撮る
  • Sign guest book ゲストブックに署名する
  • Play with a goat ヤギと遊ぶ
  • Visit pony and pigs ポニーと豚を訪問
  • Try various drinks 様々な飲み物を試してください

⃞ 1  ⃞ 2 ⃞ 3 ⃞ 4 ⃞ 5 ⃞ 6 ⃞ 7 ⃞ 8 ⃞ 9

  • Have a dance ダンスをする
  • Eat food 食べ物を食べる
  • Eat more food もっと食べ物を食べる
  • Eat cake ケーキを食べる
  • Meet a new friend 新しい友達に会う
  • Give someone a hug 誰かに抱擁をする
  • Say congratulations to D+R 新郎新婦におめでとうを言う
  • Receive gift bag (write your name) ギフトバッグを受け取る (あなたの名前を書く)
  • Thanks to Mr Kobayashi 小林さん、ありがとう
  • Thank the band バンドありがとう
  • Post a photo to SNS with #DRO420 SNSに写真を投稿する #DRO420

 

Documentation of the honorary Canadian consulate in Osaka / Dave + Ryoko 4-20 Kekkon-shiki

What follow is documentation of the Honorary Canadian Consulate in Osaka, located basically in the parking lot of a pre-cut wood shop with lumber imported from BC.

Observed, various:

  • I was the first person to sign the guest register this year
  • Walls were adorned with newspaper clippings from a decade or so ago
  • Signs encouraging “More fish and wood”

  • Several beautiful canoes (unused)

  • (Somewhat oddly) wooden pig roaster in the lobby

The location, as you likely as assumed considering it’s a lumberyard, is in an industrial park area (photo of street included) and required a variety of transportation schemes to get there including the “new tram”.
 
 
While the experience was a little bit surprising (I have a whole riff about the underutilization of consulates and embassies I’ll save for another time), I’m glad it exists as it saved us from a much longer (and more expensive and more hectic trip) to Tokyo.
 
 
By the way, the required paperwork was an official affidavit to say that I am free to marry 藤田良子 which we then present at the City Hall on 19th (assuming the certified version arrives by registered mail in due course — update: arrived in Tsuda Lumber Company envelope) to formally register our marriage on April 19th before Shinto ceremony on 20th then party and another ceremony on 21st.