Category Archives: Ephemeral Tidbits

endless variety of links, resources, tools of note and other bits of interestingness which don’t fit elsewhere (often in process) note: some topics (writing, cannabis, vws…) may live in own category

Riff: A bunch of stories to finish, eventually (maybe)

[Audio transcript from an updated/location undisclosed recording / Pasted, uncorrected]

Completely unrelated snapshot

Some of the projects I want to make over the next little while:

I want to write a collection of short stories that is just all wacky times, immediately leading up to or following quitting jobs.

Specifically, there is leaving Star Sand Beach Club very quickly and going to Palau and Yap, going directly to the airport and disappearing rather than going to the beach club (in retrospect, seems like the best job ever but for reasons, it just wasn’t.

There is the ATG drug testing, going to Belize incident.

There is the SS Neptune, leaving-to-be-a-schoolteacher-and-getting-karmically-bitten-in-the ass idea.

There is the leaving Kinko’s with a fax at six in the morning and going off to make a film story. That is a pretty good one.

There is the Wirthlin Group phone survey job that was such a nightmare and getting fired from that for not asking personal enough questions, then crashing the office party two days later and mooning the boss in front of everyone and pulling out while the cops pulled in the other way. That was a really good one.

There is Sharpey’s, but I didn’t quit that one, Well I quit but you know with noticing on good terms planning to go back to university of Utah which in retrospect was a colossal mistake. That one was a nice job. The stories aren’t as funny but they’re nice. Although, there was that good incident of getting my car crashed into and taking the insurance claim – this station is called Joyce Collinwood now – taking the insurance settlement money and parting with it and pulling out the dent with a coat hanger.

There is also the Pizza Beast and Pizza Feast incident, that one is a little harder of a story to tell.

There is also the real estate weekly route that me and brothers and I have, where all the papers went into the side yard to make a giant paper of file of pulpy wetness and that was pretty good.

There was also Bob’s story working for that jackass in White Rock that sits by the sea, going in there and me having to play some bodyguard for him. All we wanted was try to get his paycheck. That one wasn’t too bad although not great either, I suppose.

Then there was the job of delivering fliers for the travel company around the campuses in Utah. That one is not bad.

While at University of Utah, geez, I had three jobs there for awhile. “Cinema in your face”, that was a good one, where I delivered the newspapers and fliers to every bar in Salt Lake City – bars, bookshops, coffee shops, etc.

Then I worked for Bing Christensen Land Surveyor. We’d drive up in the hills in a jeep and stand out there in the middle of nowhere until he radios me and tells me that he got the shot and then I stumble down somewhere else.

Teaching WordPerfect classes while sleeping in my van. Well, not simultaneously. During that period, I lived in my van and I also taught the occasional WordPerfect 4.2 or 5.1 or something for DOS classes. But those jobs sort of faded away more than exploded.

Then of course the other really big one I should tell is the story of the job in Japan with the mushroom farm and leaving that day on Mike’s bike and that I have taken up in the trunk of the K car and running away from that horrible job up in the hills with the old ladies.

So if I could bust out ten stories of a thousand or two thousand words each, where it’s really just talking about quitting a job and going someplace rapidly, I think that would be beauty.

Continue reading Riff: A bunch of stories to finish, eventually (maybe)

Time traveling to Café Independants (sic), 2015 / 2022

Time traveling to sometime between the wars in a basement bar somewhere in France (or maybe more recently in Kyoto in a former newspaper office).

Or maybe this was the time, time traveling to another time not traveled to (yet).

Either way, creating artifacts for evidence of appearance, secret or otherwise – after all, who’s to say?

Gold & Silver, Silver & Gold / daveo at Kyoto temples (years apart)

daveo / A few years apart Kyoto Temples in Japan Kinkaku-ji Ginkaku-ji

“Stake my future on a hell of a past
Looks like tomorrow is coming on fast
Ain’t complaining ’bout what I got
Seen better times, but who has not?

Silvio
Silver and gold
Won’t buy back the beat of a heart grown cold
Silvio
I gotta go
Find out something only… {snip’d}”

R. Hunter, B. Dylan

Family at Ginkaku-ji, Kyoto

Your Olson pals at Ginkaku-ji, Kyoto (wiki / map / inside kyoto) on a trip in April 2022.

Blurb: Ginkaku-ji (銀閣寺, lit. “Temple of the Silver Pavilion”), officially named Jishō-ji (慈照寺, lit. “Temple of Shining Mercy”), is a Zen temple in the Sakyo ward of Kyoto, Japan. It is one of the constructions that represents the Higashiyama Culture of the Muromachi period.

Your Olson pals at Ginkaku-ji 

Note: I might start making this year’s festive holiday cards just because there is a great photo (taken by a stranger on an iPhone 5) *except i look a little bit chubby, Ichiro just woke up, Ryoko is perfect.

Item: Kevin Kelly’s (massive) Vanishing Asia photo book + bonus advice

I bought Kevin Kelly’s massive Asia photo book series through a crowd-funding-dealio >> [intro at his website] arrived recently and it’s massive, colossal, dense, fascinating, (literally) heavy series – 3 volumes packed in a slip case, plus I got a signed artist proof )carefully flattening now).

Kevin Kelly promo for Vanishing Asia series

Such an interesting layout as (for example) there is a whole page spread of nothing but doors, and another nothing but spires, and another of nothing but women’s faces and so on. Such attention to detail with maps in flyleaf and all sorts of maximalist nuance.

(I took photos of “unboxing“ but heaven help me if I remember where they all are… Drowning in data, but it’s all so wonderful)

[Update: Found the snapshots, here we go!]

You can still get one for yourself, not *cheap* but very worth it as this is an Asia which is very different (coming from a guy – me – who has rambled alot of these places):

Today my 50-year passion project goes on sale on Amazon. The 1,000-page Vanishing Asia is a bargain at $270 with free shipping. Ask anyone who has seen it. You’ll enjoy the long trip.

https://amzn.to/3sVRMgz (no affiliate code)
Continue reading Item: Kevin Kelly’s (massive) Vanishing Asia photo book + bonus advice

REM / IRS signing press release (with annotations)

Press release from May 31, 1982 announcing the band’s signing with I.R.S. Records including news of the first release with the label, an EP called Chronic Town, plus plans for a full-length release to follow in 1983.
REM40

“I read IRS honcho Miles Copeland’s autobiography recently and he talked about REM being the most low maintenance, easy to work with, no drama band of all of IRS artists – which of course including many notable (& great) bands laden with drama, conflict, squabbling (especially over songwriting credit/royalties), drugs and ego”

++ Noteworthy is the fact that REM split songwriting credits/publishing (read: royalties) equally between the four members of the band {guess I don’t know how/if this continues after bill berry left} This tactic is key to helping bands stick together.

So many bands split up when the checks start coming in and the drummer who spend so much time hauling gear, where the bass player that comes up with all kinds of grooves that make the song work etc gets left out in the cold… How many bands can you think of that the “lead singer/front person” left, started a new band with session musicians and just sort of fizzled out? So many band members have lifelong feuds as they split hairs about who came up with which part of which melody and which lyric was changed and end up with a dozen different “writers“ on each song or, just one writer for a whole album.

For the uninitiated, the lion’s share of the money from a musical recording is in the songwriting royalties, rather than the performance royalties (and yes I know it’s not all about that anymore in the age of streaming over physical media but this is coming from a guy who still buys physical media and publishing is still where the money is)

++ Used to be concerts were sorta a loss leader for album sales and now concerts are a big ticket item and merch is where the gravy is made (with exceptions etc. etc.)

Anyhow, this is where the REM story started progressing from a green Dodge van to a tour bus and theaters, two small arenas, and before you know it, for a while “the biggest band in the world“ selling out giant outdoor stadiums.

One other thought: in some bands (like for example the Beatles and the Police) where there were principal songwriter/s (Mc/L or Stg) the other band members would often/always get a song or two on each album >> I think in part to “be collaborative” but also to make sure they get at least a taste of the mechanical royalties from each album sold.

Of course George Harrison was a fine songwriter in his own right but after watching the Beatles documentary (that really long one) it’s clear the songs didn’t tumble out of him like they did with John and Paul. Ringo just sort of fiddled around with something here and there, helped out from his friends appropriately.

I thinking about synchronicity album, Stewart and Andy both have a song – both stick out like big toes in small shoes – but it means that there’s a check coming in for every album sold.

++ pal Mikael remarks: imho, George was, by far, the superior writer in the band.

++ my reply: my uncle agreed and made a whole album “by Bachman by George” (If I recall correctly) but in the case of the Beatles, after watching the documentary, B’s were very much a Paul and John “project” and George felt that and that’s why he kept on quitting. And dear Ringo, always showing up on time, letting the others do their goofy impressions & their squabbles.

Memento: Sex Pistols air-band / Surrey, 1984

In “honour of“ Sex Pistols bio flick directed by Danny Boyle coming out on Disney+ (without the “blessing” of Johnny Rotten), may I present:

Me [R] in 1984 at a Surrey, BC, Canada church air band contest performing Sex Pistols’ Anarchy & God Save the Q with:

  • Kamel Gill, rip (vox) – later singer for AOT
  • Brad Rees (guitar) – best pal, irl multi-instrumentalist
  • Frank Baker (drums) – who went on to be a professional drummer and pilot

{C/Would’ve actually been a really good band ha ha}

We had a strobe light, some real drums & mic, cut guitars with a jigsaw out of real estate sign plywood >> spray painted and then smashed, kicked in the bass drum (made from a laundry basket obv), wore Vans & cut up jackets + tiger prints – did take the time to edit out a couple of the curse words #goodboy.

We did not win/

PS became a Clash fan

PPS Used this photo in an issue of VOM fanzine as a concert review calling the band the “Ultimate Trendies”

Brother Dan notes: I thought the guitars you smashed were styrofoam. Like you had a 2nd set you swapped to at the end. I was there but didn’t make the photo…

Reply: You might be correct brother… If that’s the case, I wish I still had those plywood guitars, they were pretty sweet

Jack Kerouac 100: memo and mixed media artifact round-up

Jack Kerouac 100 Centenary
Mixed Media Artifact Round-up

Memo, March 11, 2022: *Happy* 100 birthday Jack Kerouac. Died in 1969, just before I was born ~ i’ve stumbled as a lonesome traveler on the road with your books stuffed in dharma bum rucksack for decades with dreams, visions, blues & haiku. Somehow, almost accidentally, lived longer than you *&* I’m (trying to be) a great dad – you still always win at the prose though.

Did you know in those last years that half a century later we would all know and still care, possibly even more? Maybe you did.

Of course here at my “creative life archive“ I have loads of videos, podcast, riffs, snap etc. about old Ti Jean, but rather than posting invisible links for further digging,

I’ll leave it to your exploration (you know how to search). Daveostory dot com and invite you (those *thirthy/fortyish* or under &/or otherwise unaware) to ask me questions as I’m working on some projects to turn “the youth“ onto the erstwhile beat generation.

Im no biographer (goodness knows they are possibly *too many* of those) but I am an enthusiast and dareisay have “lived beat“ much of my life {all that hitchhikin, all that railroadin, all that coming back to… } & have the scars, stories and notebooks as evidence.

Curiosity encouraged and welcomed.

Jack Kerouac 100 Centenary
Mixed Media Artifact Round-up

Artifacts, riffs, essays, interviews, etc – specifically about, or generally close to – Jack Kerouac’s 100th birthday. {Obviously not complete so kindly let me know if something to add}

One preview from Brian Land:

And speaking of love between Beat brothers, after the post-show groove-down ended, my German compadre Thomas Kauertz had lined up a video-chat with fellow Canadian Beat Dave Olson who’s now living in Japan following in the Gary Snyder tradition, and unlike back in the Beat-old-days, we were able to talk live on screen in that real Star Trek world we find ourselves — and let’s never forget how frickin wild this all is.  Within seconds, we’ve got Dave on the screen in our hands, 14 hours into tomorrow on the other side of the world, as we share live the visual buzz back-and-forth in real time.  Beat that!

Dave’s built a crazy directional sign post in his front yard for all wandering Japanese to stop and wonder about.  He only puts cool locations on it, and the next day he sent a picture of his next addition . . .

via Brian Land:Kerouac’s 100th birthday celebration in Lowell

Exhibit: contributions to “Cannabis Japonica” at Hash Marihuana & Hemp Museum, Barcelona

Opening "Cannabis Japonica"
I’ve got this (almost) exact same outfit!

The Hash Marihuana and Hemp Museum in Barcelona (also in Amsterdam) is featuring an exhibit called “Cannabis Japonica – A fashionable journey through Japan’s cultural ties with the cannabis plant” on display until 26/02/2023

I was invited by curator Ferenz Jacobs to contribute some stories and items from my extensive archive and numerous essays to which i readily agreed (though my work/research is not currently active/ambitious though i have a few lines of investigation for *some other time*).

Blurb: The highlight of the Barcelona Hash Marihuana & Hemp Museum’s 10th anniversary celebrations will be the exhibition “Cannabis Japonica”. On view from May 12, 2022 to February 26, 2023, the presentation leads visitors on a fashionable and fascinating journey through Japan’s cultural ties with the cannabis plant.

Excerpt: 

A well-known Japanese children’s adventure story tells of a technique used by ninjas to improve their jumping skills. The student ninja plants a batch of hemp when he begins training and endeavours to leap over it every day. At first, this is no challenge, but every day the hemp grows quickly – and so must the ninja’s jumping ability. By the end of the growing season, the warrior can clear the 3 to 4-metre high hemp.

Continue reading Exhibit: contributions to “Cannabis Japonica” at Hash Marihuana & Hemp Museum, Barcelona

Aside: Steven Heighton, Governor General’s Literary Award-winning poet, dead at 60

I keep thinking about this poet, he was a dashing Canadian “award winning” (though I’m not sure what those words mean anymore) poet, roughly my generation, he died, I know nothing about him.

Steven Heighton received the 2016 Governor General’s Literary Award for poetry for The Waking Comes Late. (Mark Raynes Roberts)

There were some articles on CBC and then he is just gone. As a poet, he reached the “pinnacle of success” which can be expected without going into the *cough cough* pop-culture mainstream and then you “achieve” this, feted with awards which only other poets in that circle know about, you get an article and then you are just dead.

The Kingston, Ont., writer published six books of poetry, debuting in 1989 with the provocatively titled Stalin’s Carnival. It promptly won the Gerald Lampert Award for best first collection and set him up as a new and exciting voice in Canadian poetry.

“Steven Heighton introduced a new basis into Canadian poetry: an approach to traditional formal rigour that was entirely original and personal,” said poet A.F. Moritz when Stalin’s Carnival was reissued in 2013.

“It became the seed of what in the new Canadian poetry is most truly experimental and restlessly seeking.”

CBC Books · Posted: Apr 20, 2022 

I’ve made a note to acquire his books although I’m not sure what that does anymore. I can’t participate in his story (goodness knows, I mostly read books by dead people) but what’s to be expected for the life of a poet size just writing poems and then just dying rather young and undramatic. So we go on.

He does seem rather interesting… yet completely in a world i don’t know.

“Some of the poems in this book are translations of other poets. I call these translations ‘approximations,'” said Heighton in a 2017 interview with CBC Books.

Source: Steven Heighton, Governor General’s Literary Award-winning poet, dead at 60 | CBC Books