Category Archives: Tools + Annotations

handy tools and resources collected elsewhere which i use from time to time – stashed here so i can find when needed

Resource: Coded Communications, Phonetic Alphabets, etc. / clearinghouse

No doubt in some program or another you’ve heard military personnel/ spies/ special operations operatives communicate using “phonetic alphabets” meaning saying a word beginning with the intended letter so the letter is not misheard –especially with significant background noise or dodgy communication channels with static and what not.

I got curious and it turns out indeed, there are loads of different variations used regionally, in different militaries / organization or different purposes/ services.

What follows is mostly screen captures and random images harvested off the Internet (wikipedia etc for research/ resource/ education/amusement purposes only.

In other words, I didn’t create any of these images, and I wasn’t diligent enough to keep track of where they came from, but I keep on wondering about these things so I’m stashing them here so I can find one I’m curious. Maybe you are also curious.

So consider this a clearinghouse of mostly outdated, irrelevant or redundant information which you could easily obtain elsewhere.

Continue reading Resource: Coded Communications, Phonetic Alphabets, etc. / clearinghouse

Online Etymology Dictionary

Online Etymology Dictionary

This is a map of the wheel-ruts of modern English. Etymologies are not definitions; they’re explanations of what our words meant and how they sounded 600 or 2,000 years ago.

The dates beside a word indicate the earliest year for which there is a surviving written record of that word (in English, unless otherwise indicated). This should be taken as approximate, especially before about 1700, since a word may have been used in conversation for hundreds of years before it turns up in a manuscript that has had the good fortune to survive the centuries.

Kurt Cobain, The Rolling Stone Interview: Success Doesn’t Suck

Kurt Cobain, The Rolling Stone Interview: Success Doesn’t Suck