Category Archives: Writing Life

links and asides about writing craft, writer’s lives, creative processes and publishing + discourse about literature

Artifact: Hot Spring Haiku (as seen at Himalaya Museum, Pokhara, Nepal)

Hot Spring Haiku – as seen at Himalaya Museum, Pokhara, Nepal

Beat life: Candid Kerouac and Pals

Bit more Jack Kerouac magic for you…

This candid, “scenes of life” outside an everydayish restaurant in New York footage (backed by a great Cat Power tune) besides showing the unscripted faces (Allen, Jack, Lucien?) whose work I/we know so well, reminds me of the importance of documenting just every day, day to day, you know, normal, ephemeral life.

Create and document your creations and life while documenting your own creations, and document that as well. 

Quote: Gary Snyder (Rucksack Revolution)

Gary Snyder with Lawrence Ferlinghetti, photo by Chris Felver (for educational use)

“I see a vision of a great rucksack revolution thousands or even millions of young Americans wandering around with rucksacks, going up to mountains to pray, making children laugh and old men glad, making young girls happy and old girls happier, all of ’em Zen Lunatics who go about writing poems that happen to appear in their heads for no reason and also by being kind and also by strange unexpected acts keep giving visions of eternal freedom to everybody and to all living creatures.”

Gary Snyder

Noble and Legendary Typewriters: as evidenced at The Beat Museum

Noble and Legendary Typewriters, as evidenced at The Beat Museum, North Beach, San Francisco, Republic of California.

“You’re a Genius All the Time” ~ Still-life w/ Kerouac + hat, pipe, sunglasses

You’re a Genius All the Time #dealwithit Book of Jack Kerouac musings about story making, assembled and published by Chronicle Books and purchased at The Beat Museum.

As seen with paper hat, sunglasses and pipe (not included). Elsewhere.

Plotting paths of poets – past & forward

Plotting paths of poets past, noting inter-disciplinarianism is key to creating context to encapsulate your content (as it were).

Write letters, fill sketch books, scrapbooks of ephemera, journals of nothings, tear sheets from magazines, pilfer coasters and brochures, collect the uncollectible, document the mundane.

Look down, crawl and fall.

Photograph your tears.

 

 

A Lunch with the Future, Contextualized

Marshall McLuhan in San Francisco 1965

Re: academic soothsayer Marshall McLuhan… in this case, a lunch in San Francisco 1965, introduced thusly (note recently deceased Tom Wolfe namecheck):

“Hot on the trail of this titan, I thought to myself, “Where is the last place in town you’d expect to see Marshall McLuhan?” and that’s where we I found him–at Off-Broadway in North Beach, lunching amid the topless waitresses with Writer Tom Wolfe, Adman Howard Gossage and Dr. Gerald Feigen.”

More… 

 

Support Wandering Artists, who wander well

A reminder to support the pursuits of your local wandering artists. Oft quoted, “Not all who wander are lost…” {but some of us are, intentionally}.

Ergo: Not running away from something but strolling towards something, maybe noted upon finding. Maybe not. Wander on, document, create, share. Good shoes are a bonus, but don’t let them fool you into stopping. Beware imposters, the self-proclaimed et al. #drifton

Looking for a Direction

Vincent at the age of nineteen

Schoolboy, junior clerk at an art firm, teacher, bookseller, student and preacher: Vincent van Gogh was all of these before he decided at the age of 27 to become an artist. That decision would change the history of art forever.

‘I heard from Pa that you’ve already been sending me money without my knowing it, and in doing so are effectively helping me to get along. For this accept my heartfelt thanks.’

Vincent to Theo, Brussels, 2 April 1881

Longform Jouralism: Hiroshima via The New Yorker (originally published 1946)

Hiroshima

A hundred thousand people were killed by the atomic bomb. Survivors wonder why they lived when so many others died. Photograph from Rolls Press / Popperfoto / Getty (Note: shared here for educational purposes)

Note: exceptional piece of longform writing, crafted in the aftermath of the Hiroshima / Nagasaki 1945 and published a year afterwards. hyber-personal character storytelling in the wake of calamity.

Originally published By now available in full in The New Yorker

Gary Snyder: “Writers in Motion” interview from Poland

Poet Gary Snyder interview from Poland “Gary Snyder – Writers in Motion – Audiowizualna biblioteka pisarzy” you’ll likely enjoy: