Category Archives: Photos + Snaps

photo essays, stitched panorama, and other (often analog) photo-centric projects

Collection: Payphones (vol. 5) – assorted / Japan

Hello to the people in the future,

What follows are public telephones created in a time when phones did not roam freely and in pockets.

To make a call, one would either enter a specially-created booth (or box), or simply stand close by as the receivers were tethered to the phone unit by a short cord, then insert a variety of coins depending on the location called (local, domestic or international) or in some cases, use a purpose-made phone card, or even a credit card (though doing so often exposed one to fraudulent actors).

Perhaps you have already imagined the unsanitary nature of sharing a phone handset (placed next/close to ear and mouth of course) with strangers – though perhaps this increased “herd immunity” despite being rather unpleasant. Note that oftentimes the coin return slots were checked for forgotten change but the miner was surprised to find discarded chewing gum, or even-less-savoury items, instead.

This gallery is simply random examples, captured “in the wild” in various locations globally. Additional volumes of similar collections provide additional examples – both international and domestic (to Canada / USA), as well as hotel house phones.

Continue reading Collection: Payphones (vol. 5) – assorted / Japan

Painting of a Cat, by Chris Trottier

My pal Chris Trottier gifted me a painting which i quite adore. Its stashed in a locker faraway so i share a poorly photographed facsimile here so i can enjoy from time to time.

Made with (I suspect) acrylic on canvas board, approx 30cm x 20cm.

 

Items, assembled: friendly cards (featuring typewriters)

These ain’t cards for business, these are strictly pleasure for those i meet and/or call upon. It’s a club, or a confederation of associated renegades of sorts.

This batch are printed on water colour paper via inkjet, hand cut (lovingly) and inky stamped (stamps assorted).

The photos featured include: making cards, writing letters and postcards, materials used for making such – including watercolours, typewriters, postcards, scissors, pens, stamps and stationery. It’s all very recursive – or #meta – so to speak.

Assortment: Playing Cards

While i have no skill no interest in playing card games, nor can i shuffle at all #clumsy, i do like papery things and often collect playing cards to enjoy the concepts, art, texture and so on. I even commissioned a design during my time at Hootsuite as a gift item.

Anyhow, i sometimes remember to take photos before i give them away as gifts, stash in storage or otherwise misplace. I have dozens here and there, 3 (or maybe more) are displayed here for the time being at least.

Artifacts (youngtime): Scout ID, Camps, Lessons etc. round-up, including “Mr Fun” award

Surrey (BC) Parks and Recreation Commission aquatic program ticket #2636 – year unknown – Mon-Fri 12:00-12:30 July 2-13. No Refunds.

Indeed, youth and childhood is often laden with activities of various sorts… some ad hoc as it were, others organized in some formal manner or another.

This round-up contains evidence of the latter in the forms of artifacts from swim lessons registration card, summer camp maps, scout ID cards and camp photo and importantly, a certificate proclaiming me as “Mr. Fun” at some summer camp with a Troop of which i have no remembrance. Carry on with the fun!

Boy Scouts of Canada 1975-76 “Dave Olson” (note signature)

Continue reading Artifacts (youngtime): Scout ID, Camps, Lessons etc. round-up, including “Mr Fun” award

Collection: Currency (variety, expired), vol. 4

Austrian-Hungarian: 1 Krone (1916). Overprinted in black color "Deutschösterreich" (front)
Austrian-Hungarian: 1 Krone (1916). Overprinted in black color “Deutschösterreich” (front)

Once upon a time… humans moved away from bartering things and services on an ad hoc basis and came up with a default transaction medium which became known as money. First coins (well, maybe something before, likely made of clay) denominated by an arbitrary, yet commonly agreed-upon, value – often made of metals which were deemed to be rare/shiny/valuable.

Then after (perhaps admitting the arcane value of metals and needing something handier to tote around) eventually created paper bank notes – first with value attached to aforementioned shiny metals, then again arbitrarily assigned a transactional value by central banks and governments.

Austrian-Hungarian: 1 Krone (1916) (back)
Austrian-Hungarian: 1 Krone (1916) (back)

To me, this is neither here nor there, i really don’t have an opinion about the “importance” of money. Indeed, if you value such “wealth” so much, go forth and acquire in exchange for your time, talents or conniving – or simply create your own currency, print it and rally folks to desire it as a means of exchange. This is commonly done in form of community notes, “virtual” currencies (often managed by Blockchain tech), or even various commercial operations making notes, coupons or points systems.

My point in sharing this is: Very often, these banknotes – both contemporary or deprecated – are lovely specimens of design art and printing technology (granted the reason is usually to thwart counterfeit versions polluting the general population’s trust in the monetary system). I very much enjoy the loveliness of printing “things on substrates” – the values to me are non-important (aside when i need to purchase eggs and bacon) but rather the artistic-ness and the totems decided by a society to represent their culture/country (often historical figures of various repute, significant events, important buildings or cultural motifs) are a source of endless curiosity. Additionally, the stories the bills imbue, often soaked quite literally into the fibres, as well as the journey the note took to your hand or pocket and/or the travel one undertook to acquire… are what sparks my interest.

Reichsbanknote (Republic Treasury Notes) - 100 Mark, circa 1920 (front)
Reichsbanknote (Republic Treasury Notes) – 100 Mark, circa 1920 (front)

As such, i gather these notes, photograph for the historical record and my own amusement and, evidently, to share with you.

What follow is Volume Four of several in an on-going series – this one featuring currencies no longer in circulation for one reason or another including some which are vagaries of war-time provisional governments or otherwise difficult to identify exact origins. Also Nicaragua.

Reichsbanknote (Republic Treasury Notes) - 100 Mark, circa 1920 (back)
Reichsbanknote (Republic Treasury Notes) – 100 Mark, circa 1920 (back)

Continue reading Collection: Currency (variety, expired), vol. 4

Artifacts (youngtime): Chief Scout’s Award – evidence / letters, photos, certificate – ca. 1983

from left Dave Olson, various RCMP and Judge, Bob Olson front, Brad Coleman far right – receiving Chief Scout’s award, 1983

In Canadian Scouts, the highest accolade one can achieve is the Chief Scout’s Award. Requires a whole load of badges and tasks and whatnot – sorta like the US Eagle Scout i suppose.

Anyhow, as it goes, most Scouts earn this on their way out and onto Ventures (the next age bracket group) but diligent as i am, earned at a young age (was told youngest ever but no way to verify) and attended the ceremony (requiring special permission apparently) along with older brother Bob and pal Brad Coleman. Must been 1983.

What follows are artifacts and evidence to this point.

(As obvious) this is a letter from Governor General who is apparently the Chief Scout of Canada) acknowledging earning of eponymous Chief Scout’s Award.

Continue reading Artifacts (youngtime): Chief Scout’s Award – evidence / letters, photos, certificate – ca. 1983

Collection: Currency (variety, expired), vol. 3

Canada: 1 Dollar (featuring Queen Elizabeth 2 of UK) thanks to Pvt. Ben Rees CF
Canada: 1 Dollar (featuring Queen Elizabeth 2 of UK) front – thanks to Pvt. Ben Rees CF

Once upon a time… humans moved away from bartering things and services on an ad hoc basis and came up with a default transaction medium which became known as money. First coins (well, maybe something before, likely made of clay) denominated by an arbitrary, yet commonly agreed-upon, value – often made of metals which were deemed to be rare/shiny/valuable.

Vietnam: 1000 Dong (front)
Vietnam: 1000 Dong, ca. 1988 (front)

Then after (perhaps admitting the arcane value of metals and needing something handier to tote around) eventually created paper bank notes – first with value attached to aforementioned shiny metals, then again arbitrarily assigned a transactional value by central banks and governments.

Vietnam: 1000 Dong (back)
Vietnam: 1000 Dong ca. 1988 (back)

To me, this is neither here nor there, i really don’t have an opinion about the “importance” of money. Indeed, if you value such “wealth” so much, go forth and acquire in exchange for your time, talents or conniving – or simply create your own currency, print it and rally folks to desire it as a means of exchange. This is commonly done in form of community notes, “virtual” currencies (often managed by Blockchain tech), or even various commercial operations making notes, coupons or points systems.

My point in sharing this is: Very often, these banknotes – both contemporary or deprecated – are lovely specimens of design art and printing technology (granted the reason is usually to thwart counterfeit versions polluting the general population’s trust in the monetary system). I very much enjoy the loveliness of printing “things on substrates” – the values to me are non-important (aside when i need to purchase eggs and bacon) but rather the artistic-ness and the totems decided by a society to represent their culture/country (often historical figures of various repute, significant events, important buildings or cultural motifs) are a source of endless curiosity. Additionally, the stories the bills imbue, often soaked quite literally into the fibres, as well as the journey the note took to your hand or pocket and/or the travel one undertook to acquire… are what sparks my interest.

As such, i gather these notes, photograph for the historical record and my own amusement and, evidently, to share with you.

What follow is Volume Three of several in an on-going series – this one featuring currencies no longer in circulation for one reason or another including Canada, Vietnam, Estonia (i think), and Trinadad and Tobago.

Canada: 1 Dollar (featuring Queen Elizabeth 2 of UK) back – thanks to Pvt. Ben Rees CF
Canada: 1 Dollar (featuring Queen Elizabeth 2 of UK) back – thanks to Pvt. Ben Rees CF

Continue reading Collection: Currency (variety, expired), vol. 3

Jack Kerouac Spoken Word, 4 LP + book collection

** Jack Kerouac Spoken Word, 4 LP + book collection **

I worked at a bicycle shop outside of Vancouver in 1990 and I lived in my VW bus out back of the store some of the time so didn’t have a record player.

Saved my Canadian dollars and bought this four disc Jack Kerouac set – which includes a thick and beautifully designed booklet – at A&B sound on Seymour Street.
Was stashed away with the rest of the stuff in 1990 and never has never had a needle drop on it yet.
This will change very soon when I spend a bottle of wine with dear ole Jack and other pals.
He’s a true revolutionary, much more than in the stereotypes,…
And like many, was a critical erstwhile mentor for a young, mostly Canadian, train rolling, world-travelling writer.

I have a quite lovely collection of his works and artefacts and very happy to have this in my hands. I need it, truthfully.

##
For the record, in Sept 2016, picked up a couple of crates of vinyl which I left in a friends dad’s basement in Salt Lake City when I left Grateful Dead tour in 1991 and ended up in Europe, Japan, Micronesia, Cascadia and many departures between. Collecting them now, feels like 20-year-old self wrote a letter for me to receive just when I needed it most. #MusicHeals

Collection: Currency (variety, in action), vol. 2

Sri Lanka: rupee (variety, with Ayurvedic items)
Sri Lanka: Rupee (variety, with Ayurvedic items)

Once upon a time… humans moved away from bartering things and services on an ad hoc basis and came up with a default transaction medium which became known as money. First coins (well, maybe something before, likely made of clay) denominated by an arbitrary, yet commonly agreed-upon, value – often made of metals which were deemed to be rare/shiny/valuable.

Then after (perhaps admitting the arcane value of metals and needing something handier to tote around) eventually created paper bank notes – first with value attached to aforementioned shiny metals, then again arbitrarily assigned a transactional value by central banks and governments.

To me, this is neither here nor there, i really don’t have an opinion about the “importance” of money. Indeed, if you value such “wealth” so much, go forth and acquire in exchange for your time, talents or conniving – or simply create your own currency, print it and rally folks to desire it as a means of exchange. This is commonly done in form of community notes, “virtual” currencies (often managed by Blockchain tech), or even various commercial operations making notes, coupons or points systems.

Thai baht (20) with coins (various)
Thai baht (20) with coins (various)

My point in sharing this is: Very often, these banknotes – both contemporary or deprecated – are lovely specimens of design art and printing technology (granted the reason is usually to thwart counterfeit versions polluting the general population’s trust in the monetary system). I very much enjoy the loveliness of printing “things on substrates” – the values to me are non-important (aside when i need to purchase eggs and bacon) but rather the artistic-ness and the totems decided by a society to represent their culture/country (often historical figures of various repute, significant events, important buildings or cultural motifs) are a source of endless curiosity. Additionally, the stories the bills imbue, often soaked quite literally into the fibres, as well as the journey the note took to your hand or pocket and/or the travel one undertook to acquire… are what sparks my interest.

As such, i gather these notes, photograph for the historical record and my own amusement and, evidently, to share with you.

Thai baht (50) and USA dollar (1) and coins (various) - as shown with key (room 204) and Do Not Disturb sign (used)
Thai baht (50) and USA dollar (1) and coins (various) – as shown with key (room 204) and Do Not Disturb sign (used) – as photographed by Lomo

This is Volume Two of several in an on-going series, this round featuring notes in situ as it were in Sri Lanka, Thailand as well as a variety of banknotes in common use in USA, European Union and Indonesia.

Singapore: Dollar (5, 10, 50 – front)
Singapore: Dollar (5, 10, 50 – front)

Continue reading Collection: Currency (variety, in action), vol. 2