Category Archives: Talks + Presos

multi-media artifacts from presentations, lectures and speaking gigs – for personal, artistic, or professional edification. find vids, audio, photos, slides and audience remarks and reactions

Random stuff from WordCamp Whistler 2009 via johnbiehler.com

Dave Olson ended the day with his talk and had the entire audience hanging on his every word. He invited people to sit up front and close since he wasn’t using the projector…and lots did. It was a great session to end the conference with.

I also wanted to play around with my Lensbaby Composer (especially in video mode on the D90) so here’s a quick video I shot during lunch where Lorraine was interviewing Dave for the live stream she was doing on FearlessCity.ca: Watch it in HD on Vimeo too.

Dave Olson describes his WCW talk from John Biehler on Vimeo.

Source: Random stuff from WordCamp Whistler 2009 – johnbiehler.com

en route to #wordcampwhistler

Hauling a suitcase full of books and zines and such on the bus for wordcamp whistler preso – no change of clothes but a 1st edition kerouac

Speaking at Wordcamp Whistler, 2008 – preview

The gang is rallying up WordCamp Whistler have accepted my pitch to speak at the event which is all about WordPress and happening in Whistler, BC, January 24, 2009.

Here’s my pitch so i can remember what i am spieling about:

Topic: Are you Worthy? Publishing from Greeks to Geeks

The mighty power of web publishing should not be taken lightly. Traditionally, for stories to reach an audience required navigating layers levels or publishers, printers, editors, distributors but with WordPress, anyone can spread stories to a worldwide audience, instantly, for almost free. Awesome! But do you deserve this power? Of course you do – as long as you make something remarkable.

To make your work rise to the top requires diligent honing of your craft – from writing to photography. Writer and documentarian Dave Olson (AKA uncleweed) will offer reasons to push yourself to create art, as well as share practical methods for finding inspiration and following through to publication.

By exploring other forms of grassroots publishing, and exploring real-life WP examples, you’ll leave with a keen sense of your place in the history of personal expression, and a renewed vigor for making your best stuff ever.

Bio:

Poet, podcaster, pundit, and chronic documentarian, Dave Thorvald Olson enjoys making arts and crafts, listening to vinyl albums, wandering in the forest, and soaking in hot springs.

Dave has traveled to 22 countries, worked as a mushroom farmer, fire juggler, and submarine tour guide, followed the Grateful Dead, and made a feature-length documentary film called HempenRoad. After founding, selling, and jettisoning several Internet companies, Dave now works for Raincity Studios, a Vancouver web agency.

Published in numerous magazines, journals, and books, Dave is most proud of his handmade poetry chapbooks, static montage art, and international audio hi-jinks. He publishes podcasts, poetry, and ephemera at a variety of sites – you can find them, if you are worthy.

Northern Voice 2009 Speaker Submission – Story of a Story (letters from russia)

Not to spoil any surprises but if i don’t post it here, i’ll misplace my notes and forget what i pitched to Northern Voice 2009 (awesome site by Alexa Booth too).

Pending acceptance, this will be my 4th year spieling forth to the assembled masses.

Year 1 – i pinch hit on a “Blogging your Passion” panel with awesome folks and impromptu banter and anecdotes

Year 2 – i was emergency replacement call up for “3 Ps of Podcasting” featuring my Bob Dylan-esque analog presentation

Year 3 – i was among the chosen and presented the secretive “F@ck Stats, Make Art” preso to the delight of most assembled

Year 4 – i’m hoping for a “creativity track” with Nancy White, Monique Trottier, Rachel Ashe and other artsy, craftsy types in a row – here’s my pitch and bio for 2009 (both awkwardly written in 3rd person):

Story of a Story (Letters from Russia)

Content – whether blog article, photo, video, podcast – should tell a story. The best stories are retold and shared with others, and the very best stories create conversations which might live on for generations.

How does a content creator elevate their work from craft to art? The same creative parameters apply whether the delivery method is digital or analog or both. When applied with vigour, the work elevates to something beyond an ephemeral musing.

Using a mixed-media project called “Letters from Russia” as a example, Dave will discuss practical tactics for harnessing inspiration, plotting the big picture, grinding out the “real work”, and finally creating a satisfying tangible artifact.

Dave will discuss the role of blogs, podcasts, reader interaction, RSS, and self-publishing with chapbooks and/or on-demand web services as efficient methods of sharing and distributing the project to an audience.

Presenter Bio

Poet, podcaster, pundit, and chronic documentarian, Dave Thorvald Olson particularly enjoys making arts and crafts and listening to vinyl albums while gazing at trees or soaking in a hot bath.

An ace marketer by day and renegade social media brewer by night, Dave gracefully nurtured, launched, sold, and/or jettisoned several internet companies. He now works for Raincity Studios (partially) revolutionizing the way media is created, consumed, and shared.

Published in numerous magazines, journals, and books, Dave is most proud of his handmade chapbooks, static montage art, and international audio hi-jinks. His co-conspirators frequently comment on his ability to recount stories after several micro-brews while inventing new lexicon and avoiding the bill.

Can you hear me now? Podcasting for social change at Net Tuesday Vancouver – Rob Cottingham

Just got back from Workspace, where Net Tuesday – the monthly meetup of folks interested in using the social web to change the world – wrapped after a fun panel on podcasting, pulled together by Joe Solomon. This was my first opportunity to serve on a panel moderated by Dave Olson, whose infectious brand of […]

Source: Can you hear me now? Podcasting for social change at Net Tuesday Vancouver – Rob Cottingham

Podcasting for Social Change Panel at NetTuesday4 Roundup

On July 8th, 2008, i conceived and presented a panel about podcasting at Net Tuesday, a movement about using technology to effectuate goodness.

NetTuesday July 2008 The Aftermath

I made a preview video, recruited some of my fave smart folks including: Rob Cottingham, Roland Tanglao and John Bollwitt, then turned the event into a bit of a gameshow with funny hats.

Here’s feedback, reactions, commentary and more from the gig posted here for posterity.

From Dale’s Digital Doodles

The Net Squared Vancouver Net Tuesday event, Podcasting for Social Change, was excellent. Dave Olson and the panel of John Bollwitt, Rob Cottingham and Roland Tanglao struck a great balance between information and humour. And while discussing the importance of story and caring for your content, they demonstrated it.

Dave Olson, Rob Cottingham and John Bollwitt

Roland Tanglao

From Miss604’s NetSquared Liveblogging: Podcasting for Social Change

We’re just setting up now, waiting for the panelists and of course – the throngs of eager social media do-gooders that will be in attendance tonight.

Robots NO FOLLOWUpdate: David Drucker is now here (arriving with John) and he and Dave are discussing David’s post about how the Hippies Saved Vancouver.

I just heard DaveO instruct John to write something down for the panel presentation, “it’ll be like one of those 1970’s game shows,” this is going to be fun.

Update: Things are underway, “so you’re thinking of podcasting eh? First of all let me tell you you’re INSANE,” states DaveO. “It’s one thing to produce content and it’s another to have it actually do something.” Dave starts by introducing the panelists and handing them each a special hat – no joke.

Dave’s first point is to note that the least important part is buying a bunch of expensive equipment and asks the panelists to express a few points about what people should think about when considering podcasting.

Rob: “I would ask myself – do I really care enough about this subject?”

John: “What will your level of commitment be? Are you going to be able to hear yourself and like what you’re saying?” “Are you going to be able to learn with each episode.” “Are you going to have passion?”

Podcasting for Change PanelistsRoland: “Do it and don’t worry about how it goes – just try because you’ll find something. We’re all creative human beings.”

There’s a difference between making something for fun and making a big production out of something when it doesn’t need to be. “It’s not a bad idea to start on a hobby podcast before you get started on something other people are dependent on,” remarks Dave.

Update: We now get to the part where the panelists wrote key points on memo cards. John says the most important part is voice – and not necessarily the actual sounds but having your opinions and thoughts expressed. “With audio there’s very little distraction,” says Dave.

[Editor’s note: Roland is streaming this live on his Qik account]

Now what about getting to that first episode? Title, point of view (outsider/insider), the aesthetic etc. Dave notes that storytelling is paramount – it doesn’t need to be a 60 minute high-quality production, you can have your own narrative.

Dave points a few questions to John about soundseeing, which is basically walking around with a recorder and capturing sounds, and talking about what’s going on around you. “You’re going to forget stuff, you’re going to go off on tangents,” it’s okay to veer off your show notes or show plan as long as you tell that story.

Update: Dave now speaks to the folks from the Pivot Legal Society podcast about how they keep a schedule, how they create stories and produce content.

He also discusses series – taking snippets of audio, bits and pieces, and pasting it together using his White Poppies for Remembrance series as an example. Rob talks about “Bedtime with Rob and Alex” which is a podcast he did with his wife… from bed.

“Control what you give away,” says Dave. “Find out the parts of you that are interested (but don’t give away your secrets or emotions) but make it personal and be aware.” Especially when it come to doing a podcast for an organization – have that element of disclosure where you decide if you’re an insider or outsider.


David Drucker and Nancy Zimmerman @ NetTuesday – Photo credit: Raul on Flickr

“You don’t have to have an intro but your podcast is a lot cooler,” says Dave, “if John had all the time in the world he’d be producing stuff for me all the time!” Dave then curses immigration Canada for allowing John to get a work permit (thus not having much time anymore to do podcast production).

John now breaks out some mobile podcasting tools (the exact one from my Lab with Leo segment). He says not to worry about the tools to start with, just use what you can then you can hone your craft and move forward with production.


Photo credit: Raul on Flickr

There are also some websites that can help you find podsafe music to use, and others where you can find bed music and tunes to spice up your audio (like IODA). You can even find artists that want exposure who might love for you to use their tunes in a podcast – such as Vancouver’s own Derek Miller who has some great instrumental stuff. “Bassoons are great, it’s like a combo between a saxophone and a bong!” quick side note about tunes from Dave. He also says that if you’re soundseeing and folks note a microphone and want to jump up and talk into it – keep rolling! Capture that audio it might be absolutely fantastic, and is totally original/organic.

Now we’re onto the tools and gadgets, there’s a woman here from SFU’s radio station who has been recording with a device that made the panel go “ooooh!” Then Dave remembers that she gets a hat for contributing.

Dave gives a shout out to Father Roderick “on paper we have NOTHING in common, but he makes these amazing podcasts.” He also shows off his new solar power unit that can plug into his recorded to give it a charge, “of course it doesn’t always work here in Vancouver.” Rob notes that sometimes high caliber equipment can be intimidating as well, “you want a compelling and honest story,” so don’t let the tools get in the way.

Dave says the biggest tip he can give when it comes to equipment is to invest in some big earphones – your ears will thank you.

Speaking to Roland, “I don’t think someone gets something out of its box and uses it to make something creative as quickly as you do,” Dave notes. Roland says that you can use your mobile phone to record audio and video easily [Editor’s Note: See previous editor’s note about his Qik stream]. You’d be surprised at what you can use to simply capture audio on the go, like your laptop internal microphone (if you must) and even digital cameras, purely for sound.


I commented to the panel so I got a hat too

Editing tools – what do you use?

Rob: Audacity – an open source application, combined with a few other quick tools for uploading, tags and iTunes magic.

Dave: Apple’s Garage Band, “it comes with the machine.”

John: Ubercaster (for Mac) – which pushes it to iTunes and adds ID3 tags for you (which is why we use it for The Crazy Canucks andRadioZoom). The similar Windows equivalent would be Castblaster. See John’s “Podcasting 101” blog post for more tips and tools.

There’s now a discussion about free podcast hosting services but as John notes, beware – they may try to tag on commercials at the front or tail end of your audio so that probably isn’t the best solution for an organization. Rob says if after hitting the button you realize you’ve uploaded something “hideously compromising,” you have control of the files and the aggregation if you’re self-hosting.

Dave is wrapping up the presentation and Q&A, “there’s a hundred ways to do it, the trick is to find the way that works for you.” Each panelist is now stating their reason for doing what they do and what they love about podcasting while Dave goes on to preach a sort of “fuck stats make art” as it applies to podcasting. If you can find your audience, inspire, get subscribers and participants (in comment form etc.) then that’s the best he can ask for. Rob says to find measurable ways to engage people and look for “wins” if you’re a part of an organization ie. “because of this podcast we were able to…”

A question from the audience asks, how do you get a peer review with podcasting? How do you know the content you’re listening to is from a good source? Dave replies by saying there is peer review, “there are even groups of people who will get together on a Tuesday night to talk about podcasting.” With regards to the quality of the content, Roland chimes in about a national newspaper in Canada saying they’re consistently wrong in their technology section and the only ones who provide accurate information are their bloggers because they actually get immediate comments and feedback.

To wrap things up, Dave asks the panel about their favourite podcasts.

Rob: The Conversations Network
John: (cautiously mentions) the Daily Source Code, if even to know what not to do and also Father Roderick’s podcasts. Also, Island Podcasting and Dick and Jane’s for Canadian podcasts.
Roland: Coverville

Colleen asks Dave what his ideal podcast length would be, what’s the attention span? He says “seabus size” is ideal for him as he dislikes the editing process and would prefer more time creating. Someone else from the audience says she say a chart that stated 10-15 minutes is popular as well as 30-40 minutes on the longer range.

Back to John’s favourite podcasts, This American Life (excellent for story telling) and for those short bites, The Onion Radio News. Dave adds in Cory Doctorow’s podcast and Jay’s Clubside Breakfast Time podcast.

From panelist Rob Cottingham’s Can you hear me now? Podcasting for social change at Net Tuesday Vancouver

Just got back from Workspace, where Net Tuesday – the monthly meetup of folks interested in using the social web to change the world – wrapped after a fun panel on podcasting, pulled together by Joe Solomon.

Moi and John BollwittThis was my first opportunity to serve on a panel moderated by Dave Olson, whose infectious brand of high energy, wit and playfulness makes it easy to overlook the fact that you’re also learning a heckuva lot from him. (That, and the fact that there’s a good chance he’s made you wear a goofy hat. Flickr photo by Raul P.)

The panel also included Vancouver podcasting mover-and-shaker John Bollwitt, who turns out to be an utterly limitless source of fantastic advice on everything from an inexpensive, easy-peasy podcasting rig (an iPod Nano plus a Belkin TuneTalk Stereo) to IODA’s Promonet as a source of podcast music. (Check out his Podcasting 101 blog post.)

Keeping up with the succession of URLs we tended to spew was Roland Tanglao, who not only diligently popped them up on the LCD projector but also streamed the whole thing on his Qik accountand served as a panelist in his own right, drawing on his extensive experience as the quintessential early adopter.

(Sorry you missed it? Good news – thanks to Rebecca Bollwitt, you didn’t! I’m hereby proclaiming her as Vancouver’s inaugural liveblogger laureate.)

As so often happens (and fair enough, with social media), the real star was the audience. We were kept hopping with smart, lively questions and insights – and the whole experience has sharpened my thinking about podcasting considerably. I’ll be mulling this over for a while to come.

Thanks to everyone who came, to my co-panelists, to Dave and especially to Joe for organizing.

Raul’s NetSquared July 2008 Flickr Photoset

https://www.flickr.com/photos/rolexpv/sets/72157606059363338/

NetSquared Liveblogging: Podcasting for Social Change » Vancouver Blog Miss604

NetSquared Liveblogging: Podcasting for Social Change

Source: NetSquared Liveblogging: Podcasting for Social Change » Vancouver Blog Miss604

Podcasting for Social Change – Net Tuesday4 with DaveO and All-Star Panel

What: Net Tuesday4 – Podcasting for Social Change


When: Tuesday, July 8, 2008 5:30 PM!

Where: WorkSpace
400, 21 Water St.
Vancouver BC
V6B 1A1

More: Meetup, Facebook Event

Sponsors: Communicopia, Social Signal, and WorkSpace

Topic: Ways Non-profits/Social Change orgs can use podcasts to spread their message

Three ways:
1) publishing conferences and repurposing stuff you are already making
2) event and campaign crowd coverage (including micro podcasting i.e. utterz)
3) special reports interviews etc.

To make it easy, we’ll cover:
1) planning
2) producing tips (with toys to demo)
3) publishing/promoting

panel:

dave olson – moderator/podcaster
john bollwitt – podcaster and audio engineer
rob cottingham – social change technologist
roland tanglao – mobile pundit and tech-evangelist

Crazy Canucks: Social Media and Hockey Panel – Northern Voice, 2008

At Vancouver’s personal expression conference, Northern Voice 2008, i presented my (now semi-infamous) spiel “Fuck Stats, Make Art” to enthusiastic reviews and then spent the afternoon with my dear colleagues from The Crazy Canucks podcast discussing our role as independent chroniclers of the NHL hockey team and the thrills and problems we face along the way dealing with team management, credentials (or lack thereof), and the reasons for producing grassroots, fan-powered media.

“Rebecca Bollwitt brings together her “Crazy Canucks” podcast co-hosts who are all BC sports/hockey bloggers for a panel on sports blogging. It’s something that’s never been covered but it’s a HUGE market filled with rivalries between ‘traditional media outlets’, rumour mills, and NHL team “officially appointed” bloggers.”
Featuring JJ Guerrero, Dave Olson, Alanah McGinley, and John Bollwitt – Filmed and uploaded by JMV

A lovely treat to riff with my Crazy Canucks colleagues in the Sports Blogging and Podcasting panel. This rag-tag group grew into a team over the past 61 shows and the panel was as easy and intuitive as the podcasts. We know each others strengths and are “giving” to one another in the conversation. The questions in the session were great and show a real understanding of the weird tension we have with the “official”ness of the Canucks and the trade off of objectivity and creative control vs selling out.

Alanah and JJ live outside the Vangroovy tech industry bubble and run the two most popular Canucks blogs out there. Alanah’s is famous for drunken live blogging which is no surprise why she ranks #1 for drunken canucks fan. JJ is the people’s ambassador to GM Place – walking the concourse with him is a task as he’s stopped more often than Mike Weaver would. And of course my good buddies the Bollwitts – the Vancouver blog and podsafe music podcast darlings.

 

Alanah of Canucks and Beyond posted this video of me (representing Hockey NW, home of the Canucks Outsider), J.J.of Canucks Hockey Blog, and the blogging Bollwitts: John (Radio Zoom) and Rebecca (Miss 604) yakking it up. My posture is horrible but the conversation is compelling for media pundits, hockey fans and social media enthusiasts Notes from NV08 wrap up.

 

F*ck Stats, Make Art Resource Dossier – Northern Voice wiki

F*ck Stats, Make Art Resource Dossier – Northern Voice wiki – Source: Northern Voice / F*ck Stats, Make Art Dossier