Tag Archives: documentation

How we shall we begin this journey…?

w/ 藤田良子 in Tsuchida, Okayama – well as it goes, after a train ride, we ate ramen and then began the future sitting under plum blossoms in the front of house.

Mementos: Barbers, various (vol. 2, international)

a pre-haircut pose in a Jamaican shop – Jamaica might have the best all-around barbers of any country. PS photo taken with analog Lomo sardine can camera

While i started enjoying haircuts when i found a barber shop which also offered libations, good tunes, pinball and the like, since “the illness” I made a list of things I can do which involves sitting down, but gets me out of the house, and leaves me with a feeling of satisfaction. These include: making scrapbooks, seeing matinée movies, sitting in parks under a tree, getting my beard professionally trimmed (rather than chopping at it myself) plus trim up the haircut,… as well as pedicures documented elsewhere.

While rambling, i like to seek out the hole-in-the-wall, no fuss, traditional barbers and enjoy a leisurely visit. Its hit or miss sometimes but ya know, hair grows back right?

Sometimes, not always, i grab a snap with the barber or the shop or me before and after… sometimes i don’t so you won’t see those. Oh sometimes i recall names and/or locations, this is not meant to be comprehensive, just amusing and vaguely documentary.

This assortment features barbers in international locations (meaning not Canada and USA), moreorless (pending).

Another action shot at another barber in Jamaica
getting a “gentleman’s mullet” tuned up in La Paz, Mexico
a fun experience in Phitsanulok Thailand in a wildly “decorated” barber shop which included straight-razor trim

Continue reading Mementos: Barbers, various (vol. 2, international)

Mementos: Barbers, various (vol. 1, domestic)

Scotty, the man who made me dig haircuts. He plays country punk, served me a bevvie and gave me laughs.

While i started enjoying haircuts when i found a barber shop which also offered libations, good tunes, pinball and the like,… since “the illness” I made a list of things I can do which involves sitting down, but gets me out of the house, and leaves me with a feeling of satisfaction.

These include: making scrapbooks, seeing matinée movies, sitting in parks under a tree, getting my beard professionally trimmed (rather than chopping at it myself) plus trim up the haircut,… as well as pedicures documented elsewhere.

While rambling, i like to seek out the hole-in-the-wall, no fuss, traditional barbers and enjoy a leisurely visit. Its hit or miss sometimes but ya know, hair grows back right?

This is Mr. Bong who’s shop in Las Vegas is hidden down corridors of a less-attractive hotel, the decorations are cheap and cheesy and location lousy but the cut and company great. He called my cut something… something to do with my affection for writing poetry… i can’t recall though i recall his name, Bong.

Sometimes, not always, i grab a snap with the barber or the shop or me before and after… sometimes i don’t so you won’t see those. Oh sometimes i recall names and/or locations, this is not meant to be comprehensive, just amusing and vaguely documentary.

This assortment features barbers in Canada and USA, moreorless (pending).

Continue reading Mementos: Barbers, various (vol. 1, domestic)

Collection: Currency (variety, expired), vol. 4

Austrian-Hungarian: 1 Krone (1916). Overprinted in black color "Deutschösterreich" (front)
Austrian-Hungarian: 1 Krone (1916). Overprinted in black color “Deutschösterreich” (front)

Once upon a time… humans moved away from bartering things and services on an ad hoc basis and came up with a default transaction medium which became known as money. First coins (well, maybe something before, likely made of clay) denominated by an arbitrary, yet commonly agreed-upon, value – often made of metals which were deemed to be rare/shiny/valuable.

Then after (perhaps admitting the arcane value of metals and needing something handier to tote around) eventually created paper bank notes – first with value attached to aforementioned shiny metals, then again arbitrarily assigned a transactional value by central banks and governments.

Austrian-Hungarian: 1 Krone (1916) (back)
Austrian-Hungarian: 1 Krone (1916) (back)

To me, this is neither here nor there, i really don’t have an opinion about the “importance” of money. Indeed, if you value such “wealth” so much, go forth and acquire in exchange for your time, talents or conniving – or simply create your own currency, print it and rally folks to desire it as a means of exchange. This is commonly done in form of community notes, “virtual” currencies (often managed by Blockchain tech), or even various commercial operations making notes, coupons or points systems.

My point in sharing this is: Very often, these banknotes – both contemporary or deprecated – are lovely specimens of design art and printing technology (granted the reason is usually to thwart counterfeit versions polluting the general population’s trust in the monetary system). I very much enjoy the loveliness of printing “things on substrates” – the values to me are non-important (aside when i need to purchase eggs and bacon) but rather the artistic-ness and the totems decided by a society to represent their culture/country (often historical figures of various repute, significant events, important buildings or cultural motifs) are a source of endless curiosity. Additionally, the stories the bills imbue, often soaked quite literally into the fibres, as well as the journey the note took to your hand or pocket and/or the travel one undertook to acquire… are what sparks my interest.

Reichsbanknote (Republic Treasury Notes) - 100 Mark, circa 1920 (front)
Reichsbanknote (Republic Treasury Notes) – 100 Mark, circa 1920 (front)

As such, i gather these notes, photograph for the historical record and my own amusement and, evidently, to share with you.

What follow is Volume Four of several in an on-going series – this one featuring currencies no longer in circulation for one reason or another including some which are vagaries of war-time provisional governments or otherwise difficult to identify exact origins. Also Nicaragua.

Reichsbanknote (Republic Treasury Notes) - 100 Mark, circa 1920 (back)
Reichsbanknote (Republic Treasury Notes) – 100 Mark, circa 1920 (back)

Continue reading Collection: Currency (variety, expired), vol. 4

Collection: Currency (variety, expired), vol. 3

Canada: 1 Dollar (featuring Queen Elizabeth 2 of UK) thanks to Pvt. Ben Rees CF
Canada: 1 Dollar (featuring Queen Elizabeth 2 of UK) front – thanks to Pvt. Ben Rees CF

Once upon a time… humans moved away from bartering things and services on an ad hoc basis and came up with a default transaction medium which became known as money. First coins (well, maybe something before, likely made of clay) denominated by an arbitrary, yet commonly agreed-upon, value – often made of metals which were deemed to be rare/shiny/valuable.

Vietnam: 1000 Dong (front)
Vietnam: 1000 Dong, ca. 1988 (front)

Then after (perhaps admitting the arcane value of metals and needing something handier to tote around) eventually created paper bank notes – first with value attached to aforementioned shiny metals, then again arbitrarily assigned a transactional value by central banks and governments.

Vietnam: 1000 Dong (back)
Vietnam: 1000 Dong ca. 1988 (back)

To me, this is neither here nor there, i really don’t have an opinion about the “importance” of money. Indeed, if you value such “wealth” so much, go forth and acquire in exchange for your time, talents or conniving – or simply create your own currency, print it and rally folks to desire it as a means of exchange. This is commonly done in form of community notes, “virtual” currencies (often managed by Blockchain tech), or even various commercial operations making notes, coupons or points systems.

My point in sharing this is: Very often, these banknotes – both contemporary or deprecated – are lovely specimens of design art and printing technology (granted the reason is usually to thwart counterfeit versions polluting the general population’s trust in the monetary system). I very much enjoy the loveliness of printing “things on substrates” – the values to me are non-important (aside when i need to purchase eggs and bacon) but rather the artistic-ness and the totems decided by a society to represent their culture/country (often historical figures of various repute, significant events, important buildings or cultural motifs) are a source of endless curiosity. Additionally, the stories the bills imbue, often soaked quite literally into the fibres, as well as the journey the note took to your hand or pocket and/or the travel one undertook to acquire… are what sparks my interest.

As such, i gather these notes, photograph for the historical record and my own amusement and, evidently, to share with you.

What follow is Volume Three of several in an on-going series – this one featuring currencies no longer in circulation for one reason or another including Canada, Vietnam, Estonia (i think), and Trinadad and Tobago.

Canada: 1 Dollar (featuring Queen Elizabeth 2 of UK) back – thanks to Pvt. Ben Rees CF
Canada: 1 Dollar (featuring Queen Elizabeth 2 of UK) back – thanks to Pvt. Ben Rees CF

Continue reading Collection: Currency (variety, expired), vol. 3

Collection: Currency (variety, in action), vol. 2

Sri Lanka: rupee (variety, with Ayurvedic items)
Sri Lanka: Rupee (variety, with Ayurvedic items)

Once upon a time… humans moved away from bartering things and services on an ad hoc basis and came up with a default transaction medium which became known as money. First coins (well, maybe something before, likely made of clay) denominated by an arbitrary, yet commonly agreed-upon, value – often made of metals which were deemed to be rare/shiny/valuable.

Then after (perhaps admitting the arcane value of metals and needing something handier to tote around) eventually created paper bank notes – first with value attached to aforementioned shiny metals, then again arbitrarily assigned a transactional value by central banks and governments.

To me, this is neither here nor there, i really don’t have an opinion about the “importance” of money. Indeed, if you value such “wealth” so much, go forth and acquire in exchange for your time, talents or conniving – or simply create your own currency, print it and rally folks to desire it as a means of exchange. This is commonly done in form of community notes, “virtual” currencies (often managed by Blockchain tech), or even various commercial operations making notes, coupons or points systems.

Thai baht (20) with coins (various)
Thai baht (20) with coins (various)

My point in sharing this is: Very often, these banknotes – both contemporary or deprecated – are lovely specimens of design art and printing technology (granted the reason is usually to thwart counterfeit versions polluting the general population’s trust in the monetary system). I very much enjoy the loveliness of printing “things on substrates” – the values to me are non-important (aside when i need to purchase eggs and bacon) but rather the artistic-ness and the totems decided by a society to represent their culture/country (often historical figures of various repute, significant events, important buildings or cultural motifs) are a source of endless curiosity. Additionally, the stories the bills imbue, often soaked quite literally into the fibres, as well as the journey the note took to your hand or pocket and/or the travel one undertook to acquire… are what sparks my interest.

As such, i gather these notes, photograph for the historical record and my own amusement and, evidently, to share with you.

Thai baht (50) and USA dollar (1) and coins (various) - as shown with key (room 204) and Do Not Disturb sign (used)
Thai baht (50) and USA dollar (1) and coins (various) – as shown with key (room 204) and Do Not Disturb sign (used) – as photographed by Lomo

This is Volume Two of several in an on-going series, this round featuring notes in situ as it were in Sri Lanka, Thailand as well as a variety of banknotes in common use in USA, European Union and Indonesia.

Singapore: Dollar (5, 10, 50 – front)
Singapore: Dollar (5, 10, 50 – front)

Continue reading Collection: Currency (variety, in action), vol. 2

Scrapbooks, in process: construction techniques and material

Sample of new scrapbook series, built with (amongst other materials): beer 6pack covers & boardgame backs, and  2002 Thuringen (Germany) sports calendar covers.

Artifacts (youngtime): Ribbons from fairs, various

Ribbons: Science Fair, Prince Charles Elementary, various awards
Ribbons: Science Fair, Prince Charles Elementary, various awards

Somehow, these artifacts have survived through dozens of moves, various countries, storage lockers and culling of items. As such, they are now rather proudly displayed here for the historical record. At risk of presenting evidence of peaking early, i see these as polishing skills and preparing for future acts, including impending/current act  3 (but who’s counting?).

These are ribbons (obv) form various events (duh) including science fairs (detailed elsewhere in this archive), plus from collections and art displayed at NW Washington Fair in Lynden (our kin lived there and, as such we spent a lot of time there and participated in the fair).

Ribbons: N.W. Washington (Whatcom County) Fair, variety of awards
Ribbons: N.W. Washington (Whatcom County) Fair, variety of awards

Continue reading Artifacts (youngtime): Ribbons from fairs, various

Scrapbook, in process – a pleasant way to pass the time

Scrapbook in process
Scrapbook: in process, a pleasant way to pass the time, sitting in bed, with scissors, tape, glue and ephemera

Collection: Hats (variety, domestic and international), vol. 2

Hats: white w/ stripes, Fila headband (a la Richie Tennenbaum)
Hats: white w/ stripes, Fila headband (a la Richie Tennenbaum) – acquired via American Laundromat Records
Hats: green, flatcap (pageboy), handmade by Mavili – a hatmaker originally from Georgia (country, not state) and purchased at Lonsdale Quay
Hats: green, flatcap (pageboy) – handmade by Mavili, a hatmaker originally from Georgia (country, not state) and acquired at Lonsdale Quay, North Vancouver, Canada

Continue reading Collection: Hats (variety, domestic and international), vol. 2