Tag Archives: museum

Items: Excerpts from “Tintin et le Quebec City” book – illustrations, commercial, and ephemera

At the exhibit “Hergé et Moi” i attended (on opening day iirc) in Québec City, QC, i documented various accoutrements and artifacts and then, whilst exiting through the gift shop, acquired a few notebooks and a wonderful book called “Tintin et le Québec” with photographs of ephemeral pieces including advertisements, puppet shows, test proofs, letters, sketches and so on. Many of the items included were somehow related to the Montréal world expo (not really the ones shared here) and related events. 

I am especially fond of the letterheads, telegrams, commuiques and other stationery type items.

Respectfully sharing a few lousy snapshots of a variety of pages here for personal memory and amusement as well as scholarly research since the book is hard to find (and my copy is in a distant place from my physical location) and to give a sense of the variety within this lovely tome. 

Continue reading Items: Excerpts from “Tintin et le Quebec City” book – illustrations, commercial, and ephemera

Diary / Museum: Tea ceremony, PM Inukai house + grave & trains plus citrus fruits

One of these two is a former Prime Minister who was assassinated while his house guest Charlie Chaplin (also allegedly targeted in the assassination to – oddly enough – provoke the US into war) was at a sumo tournament. The other is a happy poet who loves small museums. 

Indeed, today (Dec. 15) was a tea ceremony at former PM Inukai Tsuyoshi’s house (he was assassinated by 11 young officers in 1930s during the chaotic military build-up period of Japan) here in Okayama. 

First off, went to the tea ceremony with our group including Mitsuko-san with whom i rode the fantastic local Uno bus to the station where Yano-san picked us up in his van along with our tea sensei Matsuki and we met Sachiko-san at the event. 

Ryoko was in charge of the wagashi (sweets) for the event. There is more to say about tea ceremony but suffice to say, there is a lot of preparation and intention but the actual event is rather brief and while calm, not necessarily solemn but rather jovial.

Continue reading Diary / Museum: Tea ceremony, PM Inukai house + grave & trains plus citrus fruits

Exhibit: Kobayashi Issa (haiku master), museum and grave in Shinano, Nagano

In May 2019, Ryoko and I wandered around Japan on a shinkonryoko (honeymoon) with the aims of riding various trains, visiting some folks, sampling accommodation types and visiting small museums along the way. 

In Shinano, Nagano, we visited my old pal Steve – a former Minnesota US Navy man who has lived in mountain high Nagano mostly on, but sometimes off, for better part of 40 years. With him, we checked out the Issa Memorial Museum dedicated to the haiku poet Kobayashi Issa (who was usually referred to mononymously) and is regarded as 1 of the 4 GREAT classical haiku poets (along with Basho, Shiki and Buson).

Anyhow, not sure if we just got lucky with timing or Issa isn’t a big pilgrimage for others but this was a stop i looked forward to and enjoyed very much. The place was so calm because very few patrons (mid-day, mid-week in May).

Many rooms of scrolls, artifacts from his wanders, and scale models of towns and places. Most everything was only in Japanese so if you don’t read Nihongo, you are kinda outta luck but still worth viewing all the artifacts and figuring bits and pieces out as you see it.

Simply observing the book binding craft, scroll creations and map-making techniques is highly enjoyable. 

Especially enjoyed seeing his travelling clothes, pipes, book bundles , maps and journals as these are the items i have with me whilst traveling (obviously). 

Continue reading Exhibit: Kobayashi Issa (haiku master), museum and grave in Shinano, Nagano

Exhibit: Hergé / Tintin artifacts in Québec City

Québec City Exhibit art detail - Hergé draws Tintin
Québec City Exhibit art detail – Hergé draws Tintin

In July 2017, I attended an exhibit in Quebec City about Hergé and his art, especially TinTin (of course).

Really enjoyed seeing the inspiration photos, letterhead from his business communications, reference sketch items, various notebooks, satchels and pre-press proofs – evidence of a few of which  are included for your amusement.

Hegré "pop art" portrait (self?) from Exhibit: Hergé / Tintin artifacts in Québec City
Hegré “pop art” portrait (self?) from Exhibit: Hergé / Tintin artifacts in Québec City

Continue reading Exhibit: Hergé / Tintin artifacts in Québec City

Everywhere Is Anywhere Is Anything Is Everything | VAG

 

Everywhere Is Anywhere Is Anything Is Everything | VAG

Vancouver Art Gallery

750 Hornby St
VancouverBC,
V6Z 2H7

Renegade Art Gallery Stroll at Brother Dan’s

A load of static montages, storyboards, and ephemeral collages are hung at Uncle Weed’s brother Dan’s house so he gives a tour of montages from Belize, Palau, Netherlands, Grateful Dead tour, and 2002 Winter Olympics in SLC plus a bunch of other art around the house.

Salvador Dali – his home in Portlligat

The decoration of the house is surprising, extraordinary. Perhaps the most exact adjective would be: never-before-seen. I do not believe that there is anything like it, in this country or in any other…. Dalí’s house is completely unexpected…. It contains nothing more than memories, obsessions. The fixed ideas of its owners. There is nothing traditional, nor inherited, nor repeated, nor copied here. All is indecipherable personal mythology…. There are art works (by the painter), Russian things (of Mrs. Gala), stuffed animals, staircases of geological walls going up and down, books (strange for such people), the commonplace and the refined, etc.

Featured Vancouverite Sharing Ideas with Travellers – Inside Vancouver

This profile was published in Vancouver Tourism’s Inside Vancouver blog on Dec. 14th ias: This Week’s Featured Vancouverite: Dave Thorvald Olson with photo by Kris Krug

Hometown:

I grew up in Whalley, and now live in Lynn Valley, but have done a lot of worldwide traveling in between.

How long have you been a Vancouverite?
On and off since I was 4 years old, and I’m 40 now.

Occupation:
I’m community and marketing director for HootSuite.com—a social media web tool for Twitter that is used by both Tom Waits and Barack Obama.

Favourite place in the city:
The Varley Trail named after the Group of Seven painter and WW1 battlefield artist Frederick Varley—it’s a short loop through in the rainy woods near my house—you can extend around Rice Lake to see remnants of early logging culture along rushing river dotted with memorials to loved ones.

Best way to spend a Saturday in the city:
Sleep in, then dim sum in Chinatown at New Town or Floata. Find a street festival on Miss604’s blog or in the Georgia Straight, roll there by transit and dig the music and snacks. Seabus to Lonsdale Quay and either pitch and putt golf at Murdo Frazer or Ambleside, or stroll across the Lynn Canyon suspension bridge. Head back by bus through Stanley Park for Kintaro ramen on Denman Street, have a quick nap, regroup at New Amsterdam Cafe, and head to a concert at Rickshaw, Malkin Bowl, or The Railway Club (depending on taste), then meander home smiling for sure.

Favourite Vancouver artist:
Dan Mangan—this singer-songwriter is everything good about Vancouver to me: understated, sincere, charming, and a wee bit scruffy. Catch him on the rise. See also: Geoff Berner and Jeremy Fisher.

Top insider tip for visitors:
Explore Vancouver’s counterculture history including sites where the Grateful Dead played free shows, Tommy Chong met Cheech, and Jimi Hendrix practiced guitar at his Granny’s house, as well as the site of the legendary punk club The Smilin’ Buddha or at the new Empire Field on the site where Beatles and Elvis both played. Oh yeah, the Museum of Vancouver is a hidden gem at Vanier Park.

Meandering Past Monuments of Remembrance – Postcards #49

Pod cover - Postcards from Gravelly Beach - Meandering Past Monuments

Wrapping up the White Poppies for Remembrance series with a narrative late-night wander through Westminster, London, DaveO meanders past military monuments, victory squares, cenotaphs, palaces, royal parks, war museum, war chambers, riot fences, war protesters, churches, parliament and finishing at St. James park for a sitdown under a weeping willow to consider monarchy, individual rights and responsibilities, and the role of class division in waging war as London’s sirens, trains, and Big Ben fill the night.

Care for a stroll? Meandering Past Monuments of Remembrance – Postcards #49 (192k mp3, 34:19, 28MB)

Continue reading Meandering Past Monuments of Remembrance – Postcards #49

Art lovers head Northward for Monet to Dali | OlyBlog

Enjoyers of modern art (impressionalists to surrealists) should run to the bus stop immediately to head north for the Monet to Dali exhibit at Vancouver Art Gallery (that’s Vancouver BC eh).

The pieces on loan from the Cleveland Museum give a fantastic narration through the development of modern art sensibilities starting with early Monet’s (you get a great sense of Monet’s progression beyond the customary waterlillies stuff), plus Manet, Pisarro and Renior (including some from the original Paris exhibitions) – then moves on to a Cezanne, two van Goghs a sculpture room with a few Rodin bronzes before Matisse, Gauigan and a half dozen Picassos and a room of German experimentalists and Dadaists then surrealist collection with a huge canvas by Henri Rousseau, a couple of Dalis and finishes with a Henry Moore sculpture. Whew.

The exhibit ends on Sept. 17th so rush up as the crowds are growing as the deadline looms.

Here’s a fine camera phone snap to *really* convince you to go:

By the way, the Gallery Cafe is a great place to have a glass of wine and a cheese plate while listening to jazz al fresco and watching the Vancouverites stroll by.

Source: Art lovers head Northward for Monet to Dali | OlyBlog