Tag Archives: photo

Concerning Danger…

Danger is evidently everywhere, not always warned so plainly.

Pacific Blue Drum and Bugle Corps Parade in Bridgeview, Surrey, BC

pac blue parade

recently shot clips of 23 marching bands at Victoria Day parade in Victoria (natch) and was flashing back to hauling bass drum or marimba through Bridgeview for parades with no audience. they were marching bands and now drum bugle corps per se but made me think of the hijinks with all the Pacific Blue weirdos, circa 1983-4.

anyhow, curiously wondered how our drum line would stack up (better than all i am sure!) and enjoyed some flashbacks to the many parades (enjoyed memories more than hauling mallets or bass drum) and sure enough, found a photo… of the lamest parade ever… an early morning in Bridgeview with almost no one on the streets. We were yelled at by woken up residents, and joined in the parade mostly by kids with wagons and dogs.

Behold, evidence including rare snaps of legendary Rob Loewen and the witty Bill Odribege + more renegades.

“Modernity and magical realism in rural Japan” / my photo in The Japan Times

Bob Olson writes, on Sept. 15, 2015:

This photo shows a mushroom farm in Tottori, Japan, where I worked a few days in 1991 with Tyler Smith and Jared Scott; and where my brother Dave Olson toiled for almost a year. Dave took the picture sometime in 1993, scanned it about 10 years ago, and stuck on his Flickr stream under creative commons license. Now it has recently shown up in a Japan Times article. You’d think the Japan Times would have a gazillion stock photos of the Japanese countryside, but they chose Dave‘s evocative image of a stark, cold winter along the Sea of Japan.

Modernity and magical realism in rural Japan

Shape-shifting: This village in Yazu District, Tottori Prefecture, is much like the fictional one in ‘Red Girls,’ which suffers from an aging population and changing customs. | FLICKR / CC BY-SA 2.0

Source: Modernity and magical realism in rural Japan | The Japan Times — Modernity and magical realism in rural Japan
BY JAMES HADFIELD SPECIAL TO THE JAPAN TIMES

i added in a comment:

This is Saji-san, Yazu-gun, Tottori. The boss was a collossal jerk and made my life miserable (his wife had just split, he had hemmoroids (which he talked about endlessly) and had been a foreign exchange student in Yakima WA and Couer d’lene Idaho in the 70/80s so think he was using me to exact revenge for the treatment he likely received.

I am hard worker and got paid shit (especially after rent in my bunker-like apartment) but man, this was repetitive, redundant and entirely un-fun after a couple of days.

I drove k-truck to market in Tottori down windy snowy roads and then figured out a way to feed myself and stay warm and do it all again and again. 6 days/week. I finally borrowed a bike, put in back of k-truck, and told him i was leaving. He shouted, “you have no visa, no return ticket and dont speak language!” – he was correct on all accounts but i stuck out my left thumb and had mighty adventures through Shikoku and as far up as Nagano where i found Japanese (and one ex-American Navy man) hippie squatters living in abandoned villages way up in mountains. Lived old timey. Hot springs, gathering mountain vegetables, harvesting rice and wandering high in the hills with my notebooks.

 

a haiku can tell 1000 pictures…

Whomever coined the phrase: “a picture it’s worth 1000 words” clearly was not a poetic soul.

I suggest a haiku can tell 1000 pictures.

Annotations: 

Edward Charles BaileyCox Totally!
For the record, from what I understand, the original phrase was “a picture is worth a 1000 words of praise”. It was coined by some famous person who was looking at an amazing painting.
I found this info in the rumpled back pocket of my brain, perhaps someone else can fill in the specific details……..

Kris Krüg dude that’s 1,000,000 words expressed in just 17 syllables or 58,232 words per syllable. bring it! ;)

Dave Olson not sure i understand the math part of this. a poem can equal 1000 pictures. not per word but that’s possible too if ya consider something like “On the first day… Dog created the universe” or whatever that famous book in hotel rooms says.

I put forth these examples of haiku which takes me down a rabbit hole of head movies:

The wandering poet Issa Kobayashi writes:

The grass around my hut also
has suffered
From summer thinness.

Just when I hear
The sundown bell,
The flower of this weed.

Basho the Haiku Master writes:

The grass-
How wonderful it is!
The summer drawing room.
Trees and stones, just as they are

Ah, how glorious!
The young leaves, the green leaves
Glittering in the sunshine!

and one more (author unknown);

When all things are hushed,
suddenly a bird’s song arouses a deep sense of stillness.
When all the flowers are departed, suddenly a single flower is seen,
and we feel the infinity of life.

However, this is not universal and sometimes photos spark something a poem might not. Art is art but do snap a photo is not a universally more poignant way of understanding or appreciating a feeling, incident or emotion. Art is art and art saves lives no matter the medium.

My meaning with the original comment is how folks might take a snapshot without significant intention rather than appreciating the moment in which the emotion occurs. Like taking picture of an ancient ruin rather than riffing about it in a journal. Of course, a photo, in context and artfully created can spark emotions of equal value but neither are mutually exclusive.

Matador magazine used my skateboader snap …

Matador magazine used my skateboader snap in for Skateboard Week in Vancouver – same shot as @miss604 used ;-) http://ow.ly/gP1D

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Snippet from article by: 

Growing up in Vancouver we didn’t have a big range of options for terrain. The cul-de-sac out front of my house was littered with blast ramps and quarter-pipes that I built (with stolen wood, but that’s another story). My friends and I used to wheel a ramp a couple kilometers down the road to a big brick building to do some wall riding.

There were only two skate parks in those days: the Broadway bowls and the North Van bowls. My preferred stomping grounds was the one in the North Shore. It had a big snake run that led to a deep bowl. We’d ride up and down the banks, picking up momentum, then dip down and up the bowl and launch an air out the other side.

Northern Voice – Dean H

Northern Voice – Dean H

Vancouver Panorama from Cypress #video

DaveO shares knowledge like a tour guide on a visit to a scenic lookout point on Mt. Cypress road.

After pointing vaguely towards the Gulf Islands, Fraser Valley, Burrard Inlet, Stanley Park and Lions’s Gate Bridge, he caressingly creates a few panorama shots of the environs with a soundtrack of earnest folks taking photos.

Creative Commons – Remixable with attribution