Tag Archives: tips

Getting Around Okayama / Dave + Ryoko 4-20 Kekkon-shiki

In prep for a barrage of international renegade diplomats descending upon Okayama, I cobbled together another decidedly mediocre video to share a few ways of getting around the city – streetcars, busses, taxis, and bicycles – as well as a finding those said ways and other information about information, ya know for tourists.

Another dispatch coming soon with specifics about getting to shrine (ceremony), resto (fancy lunch) and goat farm (party). In the meantime, please accept my humble offering.

Okayama Transport primer with specific locations -> is station, x are hotels and o are shrine and resto

Okayama Station to Hotels / Dave + Ryoko 4-20 Kekkon-shiki

This dispatch shares wayfinding tips to get from the main train station, down a covered shopping arcade, over a canal, a stop for coffee (optional) and then to Koraku Hotel (conveniently embedded with a post office and convenience store). Then passing statues and bars, to the Okayama View Hotel – located across from the Birkenstock store ¥100 shop – and over to the Tenmaya shopping area and transit hub as needed.

Okayama Station to Koraku Hotel
Koraku Hotel to Okayama View Hotel

 

Japan Train Tips / Dave + Ryoko 4-20 Kekkon-shiki

A lil video in which i mispronounce various words, stumble through “advice”, share poorly made photos, and in general, provide semi-useful instructions for riding trains – specifically the various Shinkansen “bullet” trains to get from KIX to Okayama for various wedding festivities.

 

Tips for KIX (Kansai Airport) / Dave + Ryoko 4-20 Kekkon-shiki

A few handy annotations for pals coming to Ryoko-san and my wedding about what to do when you arrive at Kansai (KIX) airport including: getting cash, finding food, hitting up toilet, buying toys and vending items, smoking a dart and a few other fun oddities up until you wander to the train station (more on that later).

 

Going Places in Okayama / Dave + Ryoko 4-20 Kekkon-shiki

> Shrine + Resto + Farm <

This dispatch shares the logistics of getting to and fro various important locations for the wedding festivities, specifically: Munetade Shrine, Fuyahei resto and Rural Caprine Farm goat farm by party via train and taxi. Also, the general plan about what to expect, when to show up and how to dress.

Plus an overview of activities to do with free time like museums (lots), hot springs, picnics, and day trips to Kurashiki (art and canals), Bizen (pottery and swords), Hiroshima (atomic bombs), and Kyoto (everything). Plus tips on staying in communication with all your new friends – both Japanese folks and the other 25 international radicals.

map from Seto station to Rural Caprine Farm

Moving feeds, future-preserving and archiving speaking gigs

Adding my thoughts to:

How to Stalk Yourself: A Manual for Creatives Filling the Gaps in their Curriculum Vitae

Some great tips – recently i’ve moved 13 blogs, pods, columns and other feeds into one big site and now organizing and coalescing the all artifacts from various speaking gigs. So many links are expired, images removed, videos down (thanks blip.tv) and so on.

I have a few tips to add:

  • Archive.org’s Wayback Machine is a great way to capture some – not all — old posts and reviews etc. Mainstream media outlets are the worst it seems for archiving — plus some sites block Archive with a robots.txt file prohibiting indexing and/or some dynamically generated sites don’t archive well so your mileage may vary
  • Before i do an event, i set up a Hootsuite dashboard to monitor all the conference or whatever’s conversation. Instagram & Twitter hashtags, Youtube, geo-located searches and variations on my name and company name (when applicable)
  • Once i am done a prezo or other gig, i’ll quickly favourite, star, like whatever all the relevant posts (usually at the airport) and then, soon after, create an archive “roundup” in Storify (used to do manually but this is so quick). UPDATE: Storify is no more, but Wakelet does a great job.
  • I keep monitoring for a week or two for any blog followups, news mentions etc. and then add to the Storify. Storify will send each person mentioned a Tweet thanking them for the contribution
  • Once done, i create a roundup blog post for each gig including a preface for context. I often now copy/paste almost entire posts (with a preface) since so many things are lost to the ether
  • Then i add the event to a “Speaking Gigs” list on a page which references back to the roundup post

The Internet has a very short memory indeed.

PS examples (in process) at: daveostory.com

Source: some great tips – recently i’ve moved 13 blogs, pods, columns and other feeds into one big site and… – Medium

Can’t Buy Me Love: A Renegade Marketing Pro’s Tips via Trippeo

My Hootsuite alum comrade pal Adarsh Pallian has yet another start-up biz — this one is a travel-expense related company called Trippeo. He published this article (with assistance from the charming Katie Fritz) in which explores some of my marketing-fu. Shared below for the record with gratitude and appreciation.

Introduced thusly via Twitter:

@pallian pays homage to @uncleweed, master of marketing and good vibes. Get some tips from his recent @Medium post! bit.ly/1URc2VU

Dave O at SXSW 09 – photo by KK

Can’t buy me love: A renegade marketing pro’s tips for making an impression

One of Vancouver’s tech-scene’s radicals used to tout the “cheap and cheerful” effect. Instead of relying on the filet mignon to impart success and influence, renegade marketer Dave Olson preferred to take his clients to underground shows and then chat business over a bowl of ramen. The man knows what he’s doing: after coming on as Director of Marketing for Hootsuite in 2010, he helped grow the user-base to 8 million, and was integral to the development of the quirky, lovable brand.

Of course, in those early days, Hootsuite wasn’t exactly rolling in the cash. Dave and his team needed to find ways to make an impression… while pinching those expensable pennies. These are a few of my favorite cheap-n-cheerful moments from the Master:

Host a dinner party

Personal AND cost-effective. One of the most memorable moments of Hootsuite’s inaugural SXSW trip was the barbeque that they hosted. Austin, of course, is pretty intense about their barbeque, so the conversation was built in. The event was inexpensive, easy to coordinate, and most importantly, an authentic place to chat with potential clients and investors.

Mobilize volunteers

Dave loved to bring enthusiastic people together around a cause, be it a Hootsuite “Hoot-Up,” a day of renegade marketing school, or a community of podcasters. Volunteers have been indispensable to Hootsuite’s success: they have translated websites, thrown parties, shared tips and tactics, and pointed out bugs. In return, Dave and his team acted as references and champions for these volunteers, helping them gain experience and land professional roles.

Say thank you, in person

One thing Dave liked to encourage was “going analogue”. He knew that facetime was the ultimate impression – no number of Mentions, Likes, or Upvotes can replicate a genuine “thanks.” Can’t be there in person? Dave was a big proponent of the quick video that included his team waving and saying thank you! A little goes a long way.

Want more stories from DaveO? He’s logged a great many of his talks on Youtube. You can find his channel right here.

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Can’t buy me love: A renegade marketing pro’s tips for making an impression — Medium.

Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing

Neil Gaiman’s 8 Rules of Writing

Keri Smith’s “How to Be an Explorer of the World”

How to Be an Explorer of the World

The Oxford Comma, A Confounding Bit of Punctuation

The Oxford Comma, A Confounding Bit of Punctuation