Galleries

Scrapbook: Western Tour + Hitch-hiking / Fck Stats, Make Art workbook, 2015

Scrapbook: Fck Stats, Make Art workbook, 2015 (Wester Tour Book, front cover v.2)
Scrapbook: Fck Stats, Make Art workbook, 2015 / Wester Tour Book, front cover v.2

This is another over-sized construction with a vintage tour book for front cover as well as decorated a sort of flyleaf. Such interesting material I couldn’t help but include. A fantastic hitch-hiking board game makes the back cover (and pairs well with the other maps I think). Dear Audrey Hepburn (cut from a calendar) covers up the binding and a cider sticker from my pal David White’s cidery adds more old-times flair.

I put this mighty tome to use for a personally important project of assembling a draft of sorts for my “Fck Stats, Make Art” project while sequestered in Indonesia and Thailand in 2015. In brief: I took printed metaphorical photos, as well as transcripts from various talks, chopped all the raw material up and re-contextualized into a semi-content narrative, interspersed with a few handwritten pages – all of this required several glue sticks and generated significant pile of paper trimmings.

I then began editing by sticking in dozens of little notes and thoughts. So much in fact the book was bulging and, well a bit overwhelming. As such, it lives in an appropriately old-timey suitcase awaiting another chance for editing and to evolve into a final, more cogent, form.

Note: the pages *are* photographed and while don’t make a lot of sense at this point, perhaps I’ll scrounge a few up to include for reference.

Scrapbook: Fck Stats, Make Art workbook, 2015 / Beer in Santiago the day Pope JP2 died (watercolour pencil and marker)
Scrapbook: Fck Stats, Make Art workbook, 2015 / Beer in Santiago the day Pope JP2 died (watercolour pencil and marker)

Continue reading Scrapbook: Western Tour + Hitch-hiking / Fck Stats, Make Art workbook, 2015

Collection: Typewriters – variety, international

What follows is a round-up/collection of typewriters I either purchased, used, or simply observed along the way on various wanders.

Assembled for historical reference and personal interest, with annotations and examples where possible.

Typewriter: In Karapitiya Sri Lanka (Dave's personal)
Typewriter: (unknown brand) in Karapitiya, Sri Lanka (Dave’s personal)

This machine (brandname obscured by grunge) was purchased in Fort Galle, Sri Lanka in rather rough shape. Cleaned the keys with a toothbrush and solvent, added a new ribbon, attempted to repair the ribbon uptake (with limited success). The machine’s key produced a rather small typeface size making the cleaning of the worn down keys especially important. Banged out journals, letters and poems for a few months before moving on and leaving it behind.

Here’s a sample of the type produced by this machine – as evidenced, a little rough going but the keystrokes felt great and machine size was just right:

Intentions for 2018
Intentions for 2018 (typed)

Other examples are at: Night lake Diving and a Letter to Ayurvedic Clinic in Galle

Typewriter: Underwood Typemaster at Zed Hotel, Victoria, Canada
Typewriter: Underwood Typemaster at Zed Hotel, Victoria, Canada

Continue reading Collection: Typewriters – variety, international

Scenes of Life in Tripunitura & Kochi, Kerala (2016) – Lomo photos, colour

Scenes of Life in Tripunitura & Kochi: coconuts make a fine beverage and snack
Scenes of Life in Tripunitura & Kochi: coconuts make a fine beverage and snack

Arriving in India via Cochin (Kochi), Kerala, bound for an extended stay in an Ayurvedic clinic in Tripunitura, i snapped impressions along the way, capturing the washes of colours and shapes of everyday life. Also a trek into Fort Kochi on Remembrance Day to pay respects at a cenotaph (documented in a B&W photo essay and a Remembrance day podcast and a peace ramble video)

Snapped with a Lomo La Sardina (sardine can) camera with expired 35mm film, presented “as-is” with no edits and limited context, for your amusement and my memory.

Scenes of Life in Tripunitura & Kochi: the church was built by Portuguese, renovated by Dutch, utilized by Brits and now... mostly a museum (Vasco da Gama's bones were interred there for period)
Scenes of Life in Tripunitura & Kochi: the church was built by Portuguese, renovated by Dutch, utilized by Brits and now… mostly a museum (Vasco da Gama’s bones were interred there for period)

Continue reading Scenes of Life in Tripunitura & Kochi, Kerala (2016) – Lomo photos, colour

Collection: Pay/phones (vol. 3) – assorted / house phones and various vintage

Hello to the people in the future,

What follows are public telephones created in a time when phones did not roam freely and in pockets.

To make a call, one would either enter a specially-created booth (or box), or simply stand close by as the receivers were tethered to the phone unit by a short cord, then insert a variety of coins depending on the location called (local, domestic or international) or in some cases, use a purpose-made phone card, or even a credit card (though doing so often exposed one to fraudulent actors).

Perhaps you have already imagined the unsanitary nature of sharing a phone handset (placed next/close to ear and mouth of course) with strangers – though perhaps this increased “herd immunity” despite being rather unpleasant. Note that oftentimes the coin return slots were checked for forgotten change but the miner was surprised to find discarded chewing gum, or even-less-savoury items, instead.

This gallery is simply random examples, captured “in the wild” in various locations globally. Additional volumes of similar collections provide additional examples – both international and domestic (to Canada / USA), as well as hotel house phones, and in this particular post, a few other phone handsets of different circumstances and origins for your edification.

Continue reading Collection: Pay/phones (vol. 3) – assorted / house phones and various vintage

Scenes of Life in Phitsanulok (2016) – Lomo photos, colour

Scenes of Life in Phitsanulok: market life
Scenes of Life in Phitsanulok: market life

The city of Phitsanulok, (Pits-NOH-loh) in central Thailand is a workaday, very “normal” city, a capital of sorts long ago, now known for some famous Buddhas (where isn’t?) and a University.

I spent time at the excellent hospitals in the city and also, frankly, because its not on the tourist circuit of party beach towns and ex-pat enclaves. I can be comfortably and obviously anonymous – Its just normal.

I travel there by train and sometimes leave by plane from the smallish airpot (where i Boeing 747 sits in disassembly on the tarmac. I usually stay for week or three at a time, undergoing medical tests, as well as receiving traditional Thai “royal court” massage and other natural treatments.

I wander through the markets (usually buy seasonal fruit), stay at the same guest house, and eat at a family-run noodle stand or the outdoor hot-pot restaurant across the street from the aforementioned Hip Inn.

What follows are unedited snaps taken by a Lomo La Sardina (sardine can) camera loaded with expired film. I take photos “from the hip” to capture the hazy, vaguely watercoloured impression i feel there when wandering the lanes, streets and markets. This is all.

Scenes of Life in Phitsanulok: market food
Scenes of Life in Phitsanulok: market food

Continue reading Scenes of Life in Phitsanulok (2016) – Lomo photos, colour

Collection: Payphones (vol. 2) – assorted / domestic

Hello to the people in the future,

What follows are public telephones created in a time when phones did not roam freely and in pockets.

To make a call, one would either enter a specially-created booth (or box), or simply stand close by as the receivers were tethered to the phone unit by a short cord, then insert a variety of coins depending on the location called (local, domestic or international) or in some cases, use a purpose-made phone card, or even a credit card (though doing so often exposed one to fraudulent actors).

Perhaps you have already imagined the unsanitary nature of sharing a phone handset (placed next/close to ear and mouth of course) with strangers – though perhaps this increased “herd immunity” despite being rather unpleasant. Note that oftentimes the coin return slots were checked for forgotten change but the miner was surprised to find discarded chewing gum, or even-less-savoury items, instead.

This gallery is simply random examples, captured “in the wild” in various locations globally. Additional volumes of similar collections provide additional examples – both international and domestic (to Canada / USA), as well as hotel house phones.

Continue reading Collection: Payphones (vol. 2) – assorted / domestic

Mementos: Japan Hitch-hiking journey flashback

Japan hitch-hiking: holding a sign for Muroto in the southern tip of Shikoku
Japan hitch-hiking: holding a sign for Muroto in the southern tip of Shikoku

In 1993-4, I worked as a mushroom farmhand in Tottori-ken (prefecture), a rather remote area of Japan (southwestern-ish Honshu). The work was long and arduous and the boss was a jerk so, I eventually split unannounced one day.

Determined to explore some of the country before my visa ran out, I stuck my thumb-out seeking a “bouken” (adventure) after making destination signs by copying place name kanji characters onto 100 yes store notebooks with crayon and decorating with some lucky words and stamps (not sure if this helped).

Hitch-hiking isn’t very common in Japan but by sticking to rural areas – including the traditional “o henrosan dori” (the pilgrim’s path) on Shikoku (the smallest of the 4 main islands of the Japanese archipelago) which has seen many wandering poets, seekers and prayers over centuries – I skidded along alright.

Getting rides in the country areas was usually rather quick but often times, the ride would insist of showing “hospitality” in form of taking to their hometown to show off “the thing their town is famous for” (of which every town has one thing). Not ideal for fast moving but well… the take the ride, you go where it goes. Getting between big cities along the expressways was much less enjoyable and relied on waiting around rest/service areas in these cases.

I pitched my small tent most anywhere (beaches, shrines, parks etc) much the chagrin of caretakers and so on who would scold aloud in the early hours. In these situations, I poked my shaggy head out of the tent flap and yammered confused apologies in my farmer Japanese – this tactic would usually confuse the situation into submission.

Some of the time I was accompanied by a mysterious and intrepid Japanese surfer girl who thought my ridiculous plan was worth trying. I liked this part.

What follows are a few pieces of photographic evidence from these journeys, snapped with an early generation panorama camera – but developed “normal aspect” hence black framing bars on some shots.

Japan hitch-hiking: this ride insisted on a side trip to his hometown which featured a natural water source hot enough to boil eggs (in a mesh pouch) - also made said eggs rather smelly
Japan hitch-hiking: this ride insisted on a side trip to his hometown which featured a natural water source hot enough to boil eggs (in a mesh pouch) – also made said eggs rather smelly

Continue reading Mementos: Japan Hitch-hiking journey flashback

Collection: Typewriters – Olympia SM3

Typewriter: Olympia, in Pe Ell WA (Dave's personal)
Typewriter: Olympia, in Pe Ell WA (Dave’s personal)

This lovely typewriter was found at a second-hand/grocery/miscellany store in the small town of Pe ELL, WA, USA (population approx 650) for around $20.

I was travelling light at the time but couldn’t resist the purchase, along with a large suitcase, both of which i then clumsily hauled around for the rest of my wander. By the time i returned “somewhere” i had to stash in storage and disappear again. As such,  i’ve never *actually* sat down and typed something substantial with this lovely machine as yet,…

Typewriter: Olympia (hardshell case) in Pe Ell WA
Typewriter: Olympia (hardshell case) in Pe Ell WA (Dave’s personal)

Comes with a grey clamshell case, though this machine is not “portable” per se, its a heavy metal beast with a wonderful burgundy-ish powdercoat.

Continue reading Collection: Typewriters – Olympia SM3

Memory book: GD50 for brother Dan

Memory book: GD50 for brother Dan
Memory book: GD50 for brother Dan / tile mosaic from Terrapin Crossroads (cover)

Brother Dan and I went to Grateful Dead’s 50th anniversary (and final) shows – 2 in Santa Clara, California and 3 in Chicago, Illinois. We roadtripped the whole she-bang from Vancouver, BC to Olympia, WA to Pacifica, Santa Clara, then Las Vegas to Provo where we switched vehicles and rode with some pals across the midwest (camping in an epic storm in Nebraska along the way). We hit all 5 shows and enjoyed the community and music.

Other stops included Phil Lesh’s Terrapin Crossroads in San Rafael California and Red Rocks Amphitheater in Colorado to see Neil Young and Promise of the Real. We parted ways in SLC as i had to head to rescue a broken RV in Mendocino (unsuccessfully as it turns out) and Dan headed back to BC.

Along the way, stopped at various craft breweries, made loads of arts and crafts (including an massive scrapbook of ephemera, road poetry, set lists, newspaper clipping and other sundries) and a series of photos by Lomo camera. Also documented a series of two-fer photos of us enjoying beers or joints or scenery and the company of conspirators. Several of these became a “memory book” i created (via an online publishing service) for Dan as a wee present. When visited his home, i snapped quick shots of the pages (note to self: take better ones next time). Here the are the lousy pics of an otherwise lovely book – for my amusement and your curiosity.

Memory book: GD50 for brother Dan
Memory book: GD50 for brother Dan / at Ninkasi Brewing garden in Eugene, OR

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Mementos: Japan Misasa Onsen town

Misasa, Pétanque tournament, with Mayor, circa 1993
Misasa, Pétanque tournament, with Mayor, circa 1993

“You can’t go home again” says Thomas Wolfe, and i’m cool with that as i don’t have a “home” however, there a few spots in the world that i always yearn to return to – one of which is Misasa Onsen, a small mountain town in Tottori-ken (prefecture) Japan(note: pop. approx 6500) which boasts hotsprings with exceptionally high levels of Radon/Radium (is this good for you? i dunno, not a chemist – note: radon is the gas-form).

They folklore says (as per the town’s name which translates to “Three Mornings”) that staying and bathing here for three days will cure you of all your ills. As Radium was discovered by French scientist Marie Curie, the town celebrates all things France with a statue, festival and park dedicated to the wise lady, and other Franco-accruements.

Misasa, Kawara rotenburo with Bob, circa 1993
Misasa, Kawara rotenburo with Bob, circa 1993

Continue reading Mementos: Japan Misasa Onsen town