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Damn the Dam – essay about Colorado River and Lake Powell, 1988-9

“Damn the Dam” By Dave Olson, 1988-9

Photos by Johnny Adolphson (links below)

Originally written for a Creative Writing class at Utah Valley Community College (now Utah State University) taught by Larry Harper. Photos by Johnny Adolphson.

Once upon a time, there was a river, a river and a canyon. Everyone who saw this river in this canyon really liked it. Some lived for it, some died for it, many fought for it, no one hated it. Or admitted they did. All in all though, everyone agreed about its spectacularity. “Every one of these almost innumerable gorges is a world of beauty in itself…. Yet all these canyons unite to form one Grand Canyon, the most sublime spectacle on earth.” This is what John Wesley Powell said about the Colorado River and the canyons it gave life to.

The canyons Friar Francisco Garces described as “…the most profound canyons which ever onward continue.” Powell and Garces knew the Colorado a long time ago; they explored area, an area that is now very different and yet changing even now.

Up until a few years back, people took care of the river, and it took care of them. A relationship that worked well until someone decided that the river could be better used running air conditioners and so they built a dam. No one noticed much then; it was back when few knew much about the wonders this area held. Anyway, there was more than enough of this hostile, rugged area to go around. Dams were built everywhere, lots of them. It was an easy fix for the energy junkies.

“Man has flung down a great barrier in the path of the turbulent Colorado,” proclaimed the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation during the 1960’s. “It has tamed the wild river-made it a servant to man’s will.” The bureau was boasting of Glen Canyon Dam, a 710-foot high monument to technological prowess, but it could have been talking about any dam in the country (Davis 26). Now, the cliffs, the canyons, the plants and birds and rocks and things, and the river is gone.

The Colorado is no longer there as it was. Such dams back up the Colorado that still flows relatively freely and make the canyon a sluiceway between dry hills” (MacDougall 54).

So why do they do it? Why do they try? Electricity and water mostly. People generally need them. A lot of them. Too much? Any alternatives? Sure.

The flood gates should be opened, the river unleashed and the damage repaired. Let Nature reign again. Yee hah and Hieghty ho.

THE RIVER IN QUESTION

Photos by Johnny Adolphson (links below)

Today the Colorado has been rightly compared to hundreds of miles of plumbing system (Sunset 104).

Continue reading Damn the Dam – essay about Colorado River and Lake Powell, 1988-9

Grand Canyon Ramble Flashback (circa 1988)

Grand Canyon – 3 guys and their packs
Grand Canyon – 3 guys and their packs on the trail

Received some photos as a complete surprise… The fella above in the middle J/C.T (who I’m not sure I’ve seen since this journey in 1988) tracked me down to send this delightful documentation from a walk across the Grand Canyon. The emotionless faces were intentional and we were having a much better time then we let on (probably) :-) That’s filmmaker BGK on the left.

Note: J/C and me each had loaded up 24 cans of warm beer (purchased with my fake ID) to keep the trip a bit weirder.

On the North Rim after completing the crossing

In brief:

Getting packs together before starting down

Day one, knee busting endless steps all the way down to South rim (including a tunnel which revealed the canyon bottom

Tunnel to bridge

Day two across the hot bottom, refreshed by a swim in a perfect pool and time for contemplation of the indigenous folks who’d roamed these canyons before we did so for “recreation”.

Cooling off in waterfall with a hole
Life on bottom, contemplating and breathing

Day three, brings nothing but up up up the North rim which included pockets of snow and, upon getting closer to the top, piles of donkey/mule shit, while we avoided the (lazy!) tourists riding on their burdened backs.

Me and BGK at top of the North Rim
Me and BGK at top of the North Rim

We celebrated and gave thanks with a sacrifice on a stone altar.

Sacrifice to the Canyon in gratitude
Sacrifice to the Canyon in gratitude

Love tracking down analog gems like this!

Victorious ramblers!

Aside:  Also, he reminded me of our 30th high school reunion is this summer. Technically, I dropped out and attended/graduated “adult high school” at the local community college which was one of my smartest ideas ever as i took photography, mountaineering, ceramics as well as creative writing, humanities and geology (just to get onboard with this field trip). Renaissance guy in training indeed.