Tag Archives: peace

Remembrance Day with Vasco’s Bones – Postcard #63

Remembrance Day with Vasco's Bones

From an olden church and (otherwise vacant) cenotaph at Fort Cochin, Kerala, India, Dave O – acknowledging an extended medical and death related hiatus – discusses the local history of colonization by Portuguese explorers, Dutch traders, then British Raj in the context of the colonization leading to exploitation, conscription and war with no meaning to local populace. Plus the meaning of reparations and the conflict of peaceful resistance – evidenced my Mahatma Gandhi beach a stone’s throw away – contrasted with continued wars throughout the world, shadowed by disposable tourism, economic and racial caste systems.

Recorded Nov. 11, 2016, Released 11:11 Nov. 11, 2017

Gather Round for Remembrance Day with Vasco’s Bones – Postcard #63  (37:11, .mp3, 192k, 58MB, stereo)

Also of note: Vasco da Gama’s bones, black knee-high socks, French generational losses, siege of Leningrad, Churchill’s mishaps, lost human potential of engineers, poets and lovers, MacArthur’s folly, Australia’s vulnerability, the emergence of regions over nation-states, Brexit for British Columbia + Cascadia, Catalonia and Scottish successions, work of raising a child, trappings of hubris, death by disease and guns, aggressive use of intelligence, forethought and diplomacy, and unfiltered view of sacrifice and life.

Cover art photo: By Dave Olson at Fort Cochin, taken by Lomo Sardine can camera with expired B&W film.

Remembrance Day Peace Ramble in Cochin, Kerala, India


11:11, 11/11, in Cochin, India, Dave – wearing a handmade poppy on Mahatma Gandhi beach by Chinese fishing nets – riffs about sacrifices of soldiers, sailors, flyers, resistance fighters, parents. Plus discusses the importance of avoiding jingoism which leads to war and death and name-checks Henry David Thoreau, condemns greed, and encourages peace and diplomacy and compassion.

Anarchy and Peace and Love Are My Wishes to the World for 2017

#Anarchy #Peace #Love #Reading #NewYear #2016 #2017 #WordsOfTheProphets

Roll your own Remembering 11/11/11:11

For the fallen, the resisters, the hurt and even the vanquished. #RemembranceDay #Poppy #NoMoreWar

From Truth Dig comes Chris Hedges Favorite Books

From Truth Dig comes Chris Hedges Favorite Books

This booklist includes Ulysses, Heart of Darkness, Moby Dick and other classics.

The Oxford Shakespeare

By William Shakespeare

The Oxford Shakespeare is the ultimate anthology of the Bard’s work: the most authoritative edition of the plays and poems ever published.

Heart of Darkness

By Joseph Conrad

Heart of Darkness, a novella written by Joseph Conrad, tells the story of Charles Marlow, an Englishman who took a foreign assignment from a Belgian trading company as a ferry-boat captain in Africa.

Kolyma Tales

By Varlam Shalamov; John Glad (Translator)

It is estimated that some 3 million people died in the Soviet forced-labor camps of Kolyma, in the northeastern area of Siberia. Shalamov himself spent 17 years there, and in these stories he vividly captures the lives of ordinary people caught up in terrible circumstances, their hopes and plans extending no further than a few hours.

Moby-Dick

By Herman Melville

No American masterpiece casts quite as awesome a shadow as Melville’s monumental Moby Dick.  Mad Captain Ahab’s quest for the White Whale is a timeless epic—a stirring tragedy of vengeance and obsession, a searing parable about humanity lost in a universe of moral ambiguity.  It is the greatest sea story ever told.  Far ahead of its own time, Moby Dick was largely misunderstood and unappreciated by Melville’s contemporaries.  Today, however, it is indisputably a classic.  As D.H. Lawrence wrote, Moby Dick “commands a stillness in the soul, an awe . . . [It is] one of the strangest and most wonderful books in the world.”

The Brothers Karamazov

By Fyodor M. Dostoevsky; Constance Garnett (Translator)

The Brothers Karamazov is the final novel by the Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky, and is generally considered the culmination of his life’s work. Dostoevsky spent nearly two years writing The Brothers Karamazov, which was published as a serial in The Russian Messenger and completed in November 1880. Dostoevsky intended it to be the first part in an epic story titled The Life of a Great Sinner, but he died less than four months after its publication. The book portrays a patricide in which each of the murdered man’s sons share a varying degree of complicity. On a deeper level, it is a spiritual drama of moral struggles concerning faith, doubt, reason, free will and modern Russia.

Life and Fate

By Vasily Grossman; Robert Chandler (Introduction by)
A book judged so dangerous in the Soviet Union that not only the manuscript but the ribbons on which it had been typed were confiscated by the state, Life and Fate is an epic tale of World War II and a profound reckoning with the dark forces that dominated the twentieth century. Interweaving a transfixing account of the battle of Stalingrad with the story of a single middle-class family, the Shaposhnikovs, scattered by fortune from Germany to Siberia, Vasily Grossman fashions an immense, intricately detailed tapestry depicting a time of almost unimaginable horror and even stranger hope. Life and Fate juxtaposes bedrooms and snipers’ nests, scientific laboratories and the Gulag, taking us deep into the hearts and minds of characters ranging from a boy on his way to the gas chambers to Hitler and Stalin themselves.

The Balkan Trilogy

By Olivia Manning; Rachel Cusk (Introduction by)
The Balkan Trilogy is the story of a marriage and of a war, a vast, teeming, and complex masterpiece in which Olivia Manning brings the uncertainty and adventure of civilian existence under political and military siege to vibrant life. Manning’s focus is not the battlefield but the café and kitchen, the bedroom and street, the fabric of the everyday world that has been irrevocably changed by war, yet remains unchanged.

At the heart of the trilogy are newlyweds Guy and Harriet Pringle, who arrive in Bucharest—the so-called Paris of the East—in the fall of 1939, just weeks after the German invasion of Poland. Guy, an Englishman teaching at the university, is as wantonly gregarious as his wife is introverted, and Harriet is shocked to discover that she must share her adored husband with a wide circle of friends and acquaintances. Other surprises follow: Romania joins the Axis, and before long German soldiers overrun the capital. The Pringles flee south to Greece, part of a group of refugees made up of White Russians, journalists, con artists, and dignitaries. In Athens, however, the couple will face a new…

The Collected Essays, Journalism And Letters Of George Orwell

By George Orwell
A record of a great writer’s nonfiction work and an evolving picture of the last years of his life, during the time when he published Animal Farm and 1984. “A magnificent tribute to the probity, consistency and insight of Orwell’s topical writings….A remarkable self-portrait” (Alfred Kazin, Book World). Edited by Sonia Orwell and Ian Angus; Index.

Open Society and Its Enemies

By Karl Popper
Popper was born in 1902 to a Viennese family of Jewish origin. He taught in Austria until 1937, when he emigrated to New Zealand in anticipation of the Nazi annexation of Austria the following year, and he settled in England in 1949. Before the annexation, Popper had written mainly about the philosophy of science, but from 1938 until the end of the Second World War he focused his energies on political philosophy, seeking to diagnose the intellectual origins of German and Soviet totalitarianism. The “Open Society and Its Enemies” was the result.

The Origins of Totalitarianism

By Hannah Arendt
The Origins of Totalitarianism begins with the rise of anti-Semitism in central and western Europe in the 1800s and continues with an examination of European colonial imperialism from 1884 to the outbreak of World War I. Arendt explores the institutions and operations of totalitarian movements, focusing on the two genuine forms of totalitarian government in our time—Nazi Germany and Stalinist Russia—which she adroitly recognizes were two sides of the same coin, rather than opposing philosophies of Right and Left. From this vantage point, she discusses the evolution of classes into masses, the role of propaganda in dealing with the nontotalitarian world, the use of terror, and the nature of isolation and loneliness as preconditions for total domination.

Moral Man and Immoral Society

By Reinhold Niebuhr
Moral Man and Immoral Society is Reinhold Niebuhr’s important early study in ethics and politics. Forthright and realistic, it discusses the inevitability of social conflict, the brutal behavior of human collectives of every sort, the inability of rationalists and social scientists to even imagine the realities of collective power, and, ultimately, how individual morality can overcome social immorality.

The Nature and Destiny of Man

By Reinhold Niebuhr; Robin W. Lovin (Introduction by)

“The Nature and Destiny of Man” issues a vigorous challenge to Western civilization to understand its roots in the faith of the Bible, particularly the Hebraic tradition. The growth, corruption, and purification of the important Western emphases on individuality are insightfully chronicled here. This book is arguably Reinhold Niebuhr’s most important work. It offers a sustained articulation of Niebuhr’s theological ethics and is considered a landmark in twentieth-century thought.

Democracy Incorporated: Managed Democracy and the Specter of Inverted Totalitarianism

By Sheldon S. Wolin
Democracy is struggling in America—by now this statement is almost clich. But what if the country is no longer a democracy at all? In “Democracy Incorporated,” Sheldon Wolin considers the unthinkable: has America unwittingly morphed into a new and strange kind of political hybrid, one where economic and state powers are conjoined and virtually unbridled? Can the nation check its descent into what the author terms “inverted totalitarianism”?
Wolin portrays a country where citizens are politically uninterested and submissive—and where elites are eager to keep them that way. At best the nation has become a “managed democracy” where the public is shepherded, not sovereign. At worst it is a place where corporate power no longer answers to state controls. Wolin makes clear that today’s America is in no way morally or politically comparable to totalitarian states like Nazi Germany, yet he warns that unchecked economic power risks verging on total power and has its own unnerving pathologies. Wolin examines the myths and mythmaking that justify today’s politics, the quest for an…

The Destruction of the European Jews

By Raul Hilberg
A three-volume study of the Holocaust. First published in 1961, Raul Hilberg’s comprehensive account of how Germany annihilated the Jewish community of Europe spurred discussion, galvanized further research, and shaped the entire field of Holocaust studies. This revised and expanded edition of Hilberg’s classic work extends the scope of his study and includes 80,000 words of new material, particularly from archives in Eastern Europe, added over a lifetime of research. It is the definitive work of a scholar who has devoted more than 50 years to exploring and analyzing the realities of the Holocaust. Spanning the 12-year period of anti-Jewish actions from 1933 to 1945, Hilberg’s study encompasses Germany and all the territories under German rule or influence. Its principal focus is on the large number of perpetrators – civil servants, military personnel, Nazi party functionaries, SS men, and representatives of private enterprises – in the machinery of death.

Samuel Johnson: A Biography

By W. Jackson Bate
Bate’s magisterial biography provides a picture of Johnson as a genius and as a human being, a man whose brilliance was born out of the torment of his mind.

The Fire Next Time

By James Baldwin

At once a powerful evocation of his childhood in Harlem and a disturbing examination of the consequences of racial injustice, The Fire Next Time, which galvanized the nation in the early days of the Civil Rights movement, stands as one of the essential works of our literature.

In Search of Lost Time

By Marcel Proust

For this authoritative English-language edition, D. J. Enright has revised the late Terence Kilmartin’s acclaimed reworking of C. K. Scott Moncrieff’s translation to take into account the new definitive French editions of À la recherche du temps perdu (the final volume of these new editions was published by the Bibliothèque de la Pléiade in 1989).

Ulysses

By James Joyce

Loosely based on the Odyssey, this landmark of modern literature follows ordinary Dubliners through an entire day in 1904. Captivating experimental techniques range from interior monologues to exuberant wordplay and earthy humor.

Social media bonanza update – Podcast Preview

Rolling out podcasts at usual epic pace including a few new series and guest appearances of sorts:

In case you missed it:

The Crazy Canucks
Primer on the Super Series  – a bit stale now but John added some beats while make my historical spiel worth a listen

Postcards from Gravelly Beach
Part second to last of the White Poppies for Remembrance series with an essay about why not to wear a poppy (respect by avoiding war) and some more hand-selected tunes paired like a pinot noir and gorgonzola

Canadian Podcast Buffet
Cross border podcast evangelist and diplomat Mark Blevis came to visit Vancouver and recorded some snippets of me, the charming Bollwits and the hilarious dudes form Foreskin Radio and Suburban Transpondency begging the question “why do al the fine podcasters come from Surrey?”

Raincity Radio
i’ve resurrected an old series started by Mark, Robert, Megan and others and busted out a healthy batch about web community building in Vancouver and elsewhere with guests including Jordan Behan, Marc Laporte, Boris Mann, Robert, Francis, Erik, Mark, etc.

Choogle on!
Absinthe on Thanksgiving Night Market, Hemp for Victory, Riveside chat

Canucks Outsider
Shifting into gear, Sorta …

Out N’ About with Uncle Weed
This travelin’ man chronicles is growing quick as i make new personal docu-diaries and find other clips needing a home

Dopecast with the Dopefiend
My UK counterpart came to visit and we talked and toked and recorded it all for your listening pleasure.  I offer half-asses analysis about the urban mileiu of Vancouver, forests, transportation, planning, politics, weed …
see also: a full extensive interview

Forthcoming:

Roland’s Rabble
discussion about the open soft/hard OpenMoko and other phones seeking to shake up the mobile industry (iPhone, rumoured Google phone) with Bryght’s Mr. Furley and PhP guru Audrey F.

Postcards from Gravelly Beach
Final chapter of the White Poppies for Remembrance series – out in time for Remembrance day – this “back cover” of the series features me spieling on about the remnants and artifacts of war and the folks pointing the troops to conflict and their motivations while wandering around London

Postcards from Radio Zoom
Radio Zoom John and I are planning a plan to bring the music i used in the WPfR series to his music-focused show.
This includes:
World of Hurt – Drive by Truckers
White Daisy Passing – Rocky Votolato
Mercy –
Refresh –
Providence – Chris Jacobsen
Brokedown Palace – Grateful Dead
First Vietnam War/Snipers at the Gates of Heave – The Black Angels
Gone Beyond – Akron/Family
Be Joyful! –

PfGB
more with Wm Lenker at the Woodshed this time a sort of John Sinclair inspired reading – seeking the right JS tracks to combo it with.

Choogle on!
My podcast queue cleaning bonanza is nearing an end:
Numbskulz grow up
London last wander, maybe a bonus show about getting to London from vancouver with thoughts on NYC and elsewhere – might go under the Feasthouse label if not Choogley enough

Herby’s tales of ganja growing and swinging at Wreck beach

So this winter:
Work through Clayoquot recordings, water shortage, first nations reservation, skateboard comp, sitting in the woods with eagles perched overhead, wandering along trails, reading poetry and essays on clearcuts …
War resistance -seeking refuge in Canada
Marc Emery – extradition
Immigrating to Canada
Growing in a small space

Urban Vancouver
HempC taste test

the big psychedelic mop-up tray of all that’s left including a drunken (well me anyhow) discussion on the role of union in modern economy, some clips of the Dalai Lama’s Canadian citizenship ceremony, hanging out watching Seattle planes land with Cosmo

Raincity Radio:
Scales international exploits to China and more
Michael Fergusson about web communities for families
Boris and Francis about best practices for Drupal development

Olympic Outsider
a couple interviews which still need edited, release and all that with Duff Gibosn and Cripsin Lipscomb

Also Noteworthy – my personal podfather, Cosmo Goodbud Spacely started a new series Cosmo’s Spockets being a short literary snippet, a song or two and his innermost thoughts (well close anyhow)

Thoughts about John Lennon dying

I remember vividly as a 4th grader in the library at Prince Charles Elementary school when i heard the news.

Cather in the Rye is still a prized treasure to me and i am pissed about fcking Chpmn tainting its legacy as well as taking away a great peacemaker.

I am in Jamaica in the shadows of Bob Marley’s cabin and can’t help but to think how the world would be different with just the presence of these two world-changers. It’s up to us now.

War(s) are/is Over if you Want it.

Vimy Ridge Diaries on Remembrance Day – Postcard #61

Vimy Rdge Diaires

On Remembrance Day in sunny, brisk Vancouver, Ian Bell (fresh from a CBC appearance “On The Coast“) joins Dave to read from Grandpa Mark’s diaries written in the trenches in WW1 as a young Canadian. From the library steps with a flask of scotch, they reflect on the costs and motivations of war, importance of friendship and the ethereal experience of going “over the top” and facing the terror on the other side, plus anecdotes about capturing Germans soldiers and discourse on the importance of personal documentation to pass forward to generations.

Sit awhile for: Vimy Ridge Diaries on Remembrance Day – Postcard #61 (38:00, 32MB, 128k mp3)

Continue reading Vimy Ridge Diaries on Remembrance Day – Postcard #61

Remembrance Day Events in Vancouver plus Canadian Campaigns

helmet and obelisk Like many folks, Remembrance Day is a reflective day for me – and one of conflicting emotions. As a pacifist who abhors war, i feel the best way to honour veterans is to work with full human intelligence, intellect and emotion to prevent war and senseless killing. With this in mind, i take the day to remember the fallen who fell victim to the myriad atrocities of war and enjoy tracking down the stories of Canadians heroes like Talbot Papineau and watching historical documentaries about the wars and other efforts to make peace. A couple years ago, i recorded a podcast series called White Poppies for Remembrance discussing the various emotions stirred up in my belly while reflecting on the vast lost human potential. Last year, my pal Trauben and I stood out in the rain at Cates park for a sea-born ceremony and then hiked the Baden Powell trail from Seymour to Lynn Valley – he’s a former Air Cadet and me a cub scout so we’re well used to rainy ceremonies ;-). I also make sure to hear bagpipes each year.

Remembrance Day at UBC

This year, i think i’m heading to pay respects at UBC War Memorial Gym – built to honour soldiers by students, UBC’s architecturally advanced for its time is hosting a Remembrance Day ceremony

https://i2.wp.com/www.library.ubc.ca/archives/warmemgym/1955-1.jpg?w=474

ergo:

This year, the Remembrance Day ceremony will be held on Wednesday, November 11 at 10:50 a.m. It will be an opportunity to honour and remember all those who served in times of war, military conflict and peace.

This year, 2009, we commemorate two special and historic milestones, the 65th Anniversary of D-Day and the Battle of Normandy and the 100th Anniversary of the Canadian Red Cross. In recognition of the completion of the restoration work on the Memorial Wall, this year’s guest speaker, Lieutenant-Colonel (retired) Donald G. MacLeod, CD, BA’ 53 will focus his address on the Korean War.

Everyone is welcome to attend this annual ceremony — doors open at 10:00 a.m. The ceremony will commence at 10:50 a.m. and will last for approximately 45 minutes. Light refreshments will be served after the ceremony and all are welcome to stay.

Remembrance Campaign

CDN Veterans Affairs asks How Will you Remember? Download Canadian historical war time photo and video packs, organized by theme and era, then remix and share via social networks including Veteran Affairs own Youtube channel and Facebook page plus web graphics to promote the campaign.

Finally, you can choose a Postcards for Peace + RSS feeds for  convenience and a Google map of Remembrance Day Activities across Canada – though the info for the Vancouver events was incomplete – ditto for the HTML version of Remembrance Day events. {note: good effort and great idea but would be better if photos were preview-able or the packs described – really a lovely use of public archives}

Vancouver Remembrance Day Events

Basically, in Vancouver, your options are: Victory Square, Canada Place – closed caption of Victory Square ceremony, Grandview Park, Stanley Park, or Memorial Park South (Vancouver’s original Cenotaph IIRC). Here are details from Remembrance Day ceremonies at Vancouver City Parks:

Remembrance Day Ceremony November 11th at Memorial Park South East 41st Avenue and Prince Albert Street.Ceremony begins 10:30 am  March to cenotaph at 10:15 from John Oliver SS. Sponsored by the Royal Canadian Legion Branch # 16. Memorial Park South event program

Remembrance Day Ceremony November 11th at Grandview Park Sponsored by the Royal Canadian Legion #179 at 11 am located at Commercial and Cotton Drives.  A march to the cenotaph begins at 10:35 am from Napier Street and Commercial Drive.

Remembrance Day Ceremony November 11th at Stanley Park Gather at 10:40 am Sponsored by the Japanese Canadian War Memorial Committee at the Japanese Monument near the Stanley Park Pavilion.

Remembrance Day Ceremony November 11th at Victory Square Gather at 10:30. Major representation by civic officials at 11 am at Cambie and Hastings Streets. A colourful parade precedes the event. Event details

In North Van, you can attend the Victoria Park Cenotaph with a parade to Lonsdale and 15th.

Podcast: Consider taking along some White Poppies for Remembrance on Postcards from Gravelly Beach podcasts Subscribe to PfGB Feed Subscribe in PfGB in iTunes

His Holiness Dalai Lama 14 is Canadian! – Choogle on #75

From the vault comes the story of His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama’s honorary Canadian citizenship ceremony at the Canucks rink in Vancouver. Along with a rousing Oh Canada!, and the official ceremony, comes a few words of humour and counsel from HHDL14 and his eloquent assistant and discussion of the Dalai Lama Centre for Peace in Vancouver.

Get out your prayer flags because His Holiness Dalai Lama 14 is Canadian! – Choogle on #75 (.mp3, 15MB, 16:01)

His Holiness Dalai Lama 14 is Canadian

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Grab the Choogle on feed or subscribe Choogle on via iTunes

More Podcast Goodness

Postcards from Gravelly Beach – Literature podcast – FeediTunesBlog

Out n’ About with Uncle Weed– Travelin’ man vidcast – ShowFeediTunes

Ephemeral Feasthouse – Miscellanea & notes – BlogFeedPodcast

Clubside Breakfast Time – OlyWa Rock and Punditry – BlogFeediTunes

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