Tag Archives: book

Items: Excerpts from “Tintin et le Quebec City” book – illustrations, commercial, and ephemera

At the exhibit “Hergé et Moi” i attended (on opening day iirc) in Québec City, QC, i documented various accoutrements and artifacts and then, whilst exiting through the gift shop, acquired a few notebooks and a wonderful book called “Tintin et le Québec” with photographs of ephemeral pieces including advertisements, puppet shows, test proofs, letters, sketches and so on. Many of the items included were somehow related to the Montréal world expo (not really the ones shared here) and related events. 

I am especially fond of the letterheads, telegrams, commuiques and other stationery type items.

Respectfully sharing a few lousy snapshots of a variety of pages here for personal memory and amusement as well as scholarly research since the book is hard to find (and my copy is in a distant place from my physical location) and to give a sense of the variety within this lovely tome. 

Continue reading Items: Excerpts from “Tintin et le Quebec City” book – illustrations, commercial, and ephemera

Diary: Christmas Eve, Day and Boxing in Okayama, 2019

Christmas isn’t really an “event” in Japan, more of a marketing campaign and a prelude to New Year’s Eve which is laden with tradition, nostalgia and routine. It’s kinda my speed as i am def turned off by rampant commercialism quasi-religious sabre-rattling which comes around. 

Regardless, with new family (and more family arriving in 2020) i wanted to wrangle a bit of festiveness – also acknowledging been a long while since i had vaguely “regular” christmas and while this was atypical, established some new routines, scratched an itch… after all, with the turmoil in my life the last years, there is admittedly some misgivings and rather tough emotions which come around during all this hoolpa. Most importantly, got to show love and respect for wife and in-laws. 

PS You can see a bit of building up for Christmas and read a riff between a friend and i about this holiday in Japan in: Diary: Christmas Forthcoming / out n about and at home in Okayama, 2019

What follows are a few poorly-photographed artifact of activities from Dec. 24 – 26 JST. Carry On!

First off, Dec. 24 (christmas eve) we made dinner of grilled mackeral, squash, pickled cucumbers and tsukemono carrots, greens, miso soup, tea, rice, lotus root, and whatnot. Yup, not off to a very traditional start – ha!

Christmas morn, we opened our stockings (pictured above) purchased from a 100yen store ($1), nothing but the best! and enjoyed toast with cream cheese and my kaki (persimmon) jam which i am always talking about, and nashi (pear). My sock had snacks, Ryoko’s had expired 35mm film and a necklace and snacks. 

Then we went to post office (one of my fave activities of course) and i wore a Santa cap (borrowed from Ryoko who wore at Mae Maes Christmas concert) to the amusement of the post office staff and the kids at the grocery store which was our next stop. Folks are stocking up for New Years time during which many stores are closed or scaled back hours and folks generally wanna hunker down. 

Then we picked up a pre-made feast from a great lil cafe called Sakura-mi we had ordered a while back when we went on a little lunch date. Here’s the café’s post box.

And i got to make a fire in the wood stove. So yeah, post office and fire making in the same day! Pleased. 

Took the grub home and set up at parent’s house (next door).

Continue reading Diary: Christmas Eve, Day and Boxing in Okayama, 2019

Diary: Christmas Forthcoming / out n about and at home in Okayama, 2019

Some kind of phone… possibly from a battlefield or remote office

We headed out on some errands to return the felt sheets used in the tea ceremony at assassinated Prime minster Inukai Tsuyoshi’s home to a strange little office in a corridor with the cigarette smell cemented into the cracked linoleum floors which all evoked the lost Showa times.

Along the way, a saw some shops, ate ramen, developed film, checked out cameras and whatnot. 

First though, along one of these covered shopping arcades which i totally dig (how does Vancouver not have these everywhere?), continued my rather absurd documentation of phone boxes.

I would call you but haven’t figured out where to buy a phone card. Also noting these “midori denwa” (green phones) are abundant and in beautiful condition but i (not shockingly) never see one in use. 

PS Did someone call a doctor? #joke My friend in Adelaide Australia made the snap into a fun cartoon-y image. I might do this with all photos in future. 

Continue reading Diary: Christmas Forthcoming / out n about and at home in Okayama, 2019

“Posted: Letters from Elsewhere” – book now available

“Posted: Letters To Elsewhere “
by Dave Olson
Available for Purchase

I made a fun book of postboxes, letter slots, post offices, and letter writing “still-lifes” resplendent with stationery, inky stamps and whatnot.

Order it up for amusement and edification. https://www.blurb.com/b/9807308-posted-letters-to-elsewhere

“Ideal for armchair-travelling kids and adults alike, this portable geography primer includes 42 pages of delightful, lovingly curated and collected letter boxes, stationery, post offices, plus other postal artifacts gathered from: Thailand, Japan, Malaysia, The Vatican, Nepal, Greece, Canada, United States, Oman, Australia, Italy, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, a few other locales and the high seas.”

Fits handily in a rucksack and doesn’t use too much space on a shelf. It’s pretty! Order several

Continue reading “Posted: Letters from Elsewhere” – book now available

Diary: Autumn Miscellany, scenes of “regular life” in Okayama

made a little photo book for gift and sale featuring postboxes of the world, post offices here and there, and letter writing “still lifes” scenes with stationery and bevvies (note to self: post a link or something to purchase this book)

A few years ago (or less), each day was quite tough. Now, each day i deal with pain and confusion but enough joy and interestingness to compensate. My brain fires but i have to throttle as i get headaches and eye strain very easily, i remain very sensitive to light and sounds so use dark glasses and ear plugs when out and about.

Anyhow, there are several recent “standalone” dispatches of activities and outings (Mae Maes concerts, tea ceremony, museums, tours…) but this post simply gathers up miscellaneous whatnots which don’t really chronicle anything but normal day-to-day tasks and action with brief annotations.

coffee and cake date with the amazing Ryoko who amazes me daily with her tenacity, honesty, grace and endless interests

Continue reading Diary: Autumn Miscellany, scenes of “regular life” in Okayama

An Illustrated Dictionary of Cyborg Anthropology (Amber Case)

An Illustrated Dictionary of Cyborg Anthropology

Summary
Cyborg Anthropology is a way of understanding how we live as technosocially connected citizens in the modern era. Our cell phones, cars and laptops have turned us into cyborgs. What does it mean to extend the body into hyperspace? What are the implications to privacy, information and the formation of identity? Now that we have a second self, how do we protect it?

This text covers various subjects such as time and space compression, hyperlinked memories, panic architecture, mobile technology, interface evaporation and how technology is changing the way we live.

Who is it for?
Useful for researchers, scientists, interface designers, developers, professors, students, and anyone who engages with or wishes to better understand technology and culture.

About the Author
Amber Case is a Cyborg Anthropologist and UX Designer from Portland, Oregon. Her main focus is applying anthropology to mobile computing and social software.

Case has spoken at various industry conferences including MIT’s Futures of Entertainment and Inverge: The Interactive Convergence Conference, Ignite Portland and Ignite Boulder.

Case founded CyborgCamp, an unconference on the future of humans and technology. In 2010 she was named one of Fast Company’s Most Influential Women in Tech.

You can learn more about Cyborg Anthropology at cyborganthropology.com, and on Twitter at @caseorganic.

Purchase the Book at the CyborgAnthropology.com Store

Hemp for Victory with Author Kenyon Gibson – Choogle on #52

In Camden Town London, Uncle Weed visits Hemp for Victory author Kenyon Gibson to discuss his motivations and influences for writing the book, using hemp for fuel, fiber and food, unique modern hemp products, the political pressures surrounding re-mainstreaming cannabis hemp, activism tips for emerging hempsters, his research for UK Parliament on hemp as a replacement crop for opium in Afghanistan, plus conversation on contemporary hemp production in the United Kingdom and around the globe.

Plant a seed for Hemp for Victory – Choogle on #52 (.mp3, 38MB, 47:05)

Subscribe to the Choogle on feed, via Chillaxin’ feed, or in iTunes

Hemp for Victory Author Kenyon Gibson

Get Hemp for Victory

“Hemp for Victory: History and Qualities of the World’s Most Useful Plant.” [ISBN 0-9549939-0-X, London, Whitaker Publishing, 2006.
Hemp for Victory in the UK through Whitaker Publishing
Hemp for Victory in USA via Mina Wear

Hemp for Victory reviews

Just Published in UK: Hemp for Victory – Kenyon Gibson’s new book Hemp for Victory: History and Qualities of the World’s Most Useful Plant, is out in paperback at $29.95, printed on tree-free hemp Mina Hegaard of Minawear Hemp Clothing is one US distributor. Bulk orders can be made via Kenyon Gibson, or from the publisher’s site, www.whitakerpublishing.co.uk. More information is available on Kenyon Gibson’s Hemp for Victory web site which includes a link to a recent Guardian article about hemp and the book.

“The talented researchers and writers assembled by Kenyon Gibson have gone above and beyond the call of duty by creating a phenomenally documented compendium on cannabis hemp. Paralleling the numerous uses of cannabis hemp, Hemp for Victory details its social, political and economic impact over the years. Historical and current information covering a wide range of relevant topics makes Hemp for Victory especially useful for an equally wide range of readers. Environmentalists, farmers, patients, and manufacturers will all benefit from Hemp for Victory.
From the budding hempologist to the seasoned activist, Hemp for Victory is a must have.”

John E. Dvorak, Board Member and Treasurer of the Hemp Industries Association, founder and curator of the Boston Hemp Co-op’s Hemp History Library and Museum

Kenyon Gibson resources

Kenyon’s Hemp for Victory blog and bio:

“My interest in hemp was started when my younger sister told me about the benefits of the plant. After reading up on her remarks, I was not surprised to see that major corporations and politicians have kept this information suppressed and tried to give hemp a bad image. As our climate deteriorates and our economies suffer, it is time to put the foot down and demand a change for the better. With hemp, we could make a safer, fairer and cleaner world. Writing about this for the last seven years has finally produced “Hemp for Victory”, and I hope that it will awaken the reader to the opportunity we have to make a change. There was such a plethora of information on hemp that one book could not contain it, and as events are unfolding daily, it is good to be able to blog about it; otherwise, I’d never have finished writing, as the temptation to add just one more bit was part of the reason for the long gestation period for “Hemp for Victory”.”

Kenyon edits the Journal of Industrial Hemp Association

Speech by Kenyon “The Best People in History Used Hemp

Article by Kenyon “Hemp The Bush That George Grew

Kenyon Gibson is all smiles outside Sainsbury’s Camden Town, with his hemp bag
Kenyon Gibson
Photo by Sagar at Hemp and Natural Fibres

Hemp is at hand” article in The Guardian by Annie Kelly, Wednesday September 27 2006

excerpts:

For decades, UK farmers were banned from growing a plant wrongly associated with potheads. But this versatile member of the cannabis family is moving back into the agricultural mainstream.

{snip}

The hemp community insists that it is moving hemp away from its associations with drugs and the people who smoke them, but tensions still remain.

“I loathe the fact that there are still people who think the hemp industry is run by a bunch of potheads trying to legitimise their own drug habits,” says Kenyon Gibson, hemp researcher and co-author of Hemp for Victory, a new book on the history and uses of hemp. “It could not be further from the truth, but there are people out there who benefit from keeping the link between hemp and marijuana alive and kicking.”

He believes the misrepresentation of hemp as a dangerous narcotic has been pushed for decades by international conglomerates, who are well aware of the threat that the plant poses to their trade.

“It was the large multinationals who helped ban hemp decades ago, and it’s the large multinationals who are still ensuring that natural alternatives to their products are being sidelined even in this time of environmental chaos,” Gibson says. “Look at how many trees we could save by investing in a global hemp paper industry. Look at its potential to contribute to natural ethanol, yet we’re lagging behind countries such as Brazil which are making great strides in creating fuel from domestic products.”

Token investments

“We can’t let token investments from the government into niche hemp industries divert us from keeping on pushing for the true environmental potential of hemp to finally be exploited,” Gibson continues. “The true power of hemp will be unlocked only when we’re able to use it to challenge large-scale, environmentally-damaging industries, and this isn’t happening yet.”

It is a line that companies such as Hemcore are eager to distance themselves from. Hobson says that his company prefers to treat hemp as a sustainable but commercial product, rather than getting into arguments about corporate politics.

But for Gibson, Pugh and others like them, the two issues are inextricably linked. “As hemp once posed a threat to some investors, so it does again today – for which reason some would rather leave the issue of hemp alone,” Gibson says. “With such a commodity, many positive changes can be put in place from which we can all benefit. The battle to get this recognised still needs to be fought.”