Category Archives: Music / Rock

live music, festivals, musicians and music history – curated links about the above – your mileage may vary

Mementos: The Wailers in Vancouver / drummer and drum case

As seen at The Commodore Ballroom, Vancouver, maybe 2014 or 15 or really i can’t recall. (note to self, figure it out man!)

Memento: with Metal Planet and Scandoll Bands, Tottori, 1993

Dave with “Metal Planet” and “Scandoll” bands, Tottori, Japan ca. 1993

Robert Hunter rip / Warlocks at Fuji & 72+ is a solid exit

Regarding recently deceased Robert Hunter, so much goodness and inspiration and an unreachable level.

I also feel if one passes without much pain, with most faculties intact, with family/pals at hand and over 72ish, that’s a solid exit. Hunter made 78. Even better with a legacy which will last centuries. My erstwhile doppelgänger member of GD collective as he was the one playing the role i play in my head. 

Here’s the Warlocks of Tokyo singing Robert Hunter’s (and others’) songs. Some translated into Japanese. Ole Hunter didn’t like to change a syllable yet feel he’d dig hearing his loquacious poetry crossing language dogma.

More Robert Hunter

Robert Hunter Gave the Grateful Dead Its Voice
By Nick Paumgarten, New Yorker, October 1, 2019

Hunter was born Robert Burns and had a peripatetic childhood, including some time in a foster home. He took the surname of a stepfather. He had a flirtation, in the sixties, with Scientology and a problem, for a while, with speed. He was a seeker, a restless soul, an outsider. A friend of mine, on hearing of Hunter’s passing, told me that, in some ways, by his reckoning, Hunter had been dead all along. The man seemed to know something about death. After Garcia awoke from his coma, in 1986, Hunter had a new song for him, called “Black Muddy River.” Hunter, who rarely explained where his songs came from, told the writer Steve Silberman, in 1992, that the inspiration for it was his recurring dream of a “black, lusterless, slow-flowing Stygian river. . . . It’s vast and it’s hopeless. It’s death, with the absence of the soul. It’s my horror vision, and when I come out of that dream I do anything I can to counter it.” The lone Grateful Dead hit to come out of the post-coma period was a deceptively jaunty number, composed a half-decade earlier, called “Touch of Grey,” which Hunter worked up while suffering a wicked cocaine hangover. Hunter knew that cocaine was diabolical, and identified its arrival on the scene (around the time he wrote “Black Peter”) as the forbidden fruit to their Eden, but he didn’t always abstain. It may be that some of the wistful we-had-something-special-but-now-it’s-gone undertones of Hunter’s post-sixties songs—the golden-era stuff of “Workingman’s Dead” and “American Beauty,” along with a slew of beloved songs the Dead never recorded in a studio, such as “Tennessee Jed,” “Brown-Eyed Women,” “Wharf Rat,” and “Ramble On Rose”—owe something to the regret that gnawed at Hunter over the effects of cocaine on the whole enterprise.

Robert Hunter’s Words Helped Bring Life To The Grateful Dead
Piotr Orlov, NPR, September 25, 2019

Grateful Dead’s Robert Hunter on Jerry’s Final Days: ‘We Were Brothers’
The ‘Touch of Grey’ songwriter shares intimate details from the partnership that defined his life: “We were just getting started”
By DAVID BROWNE, Rolling Stone,  MARCH 11, 2015

Rain Man
The visionary wordsmith Robert Hunter takes to the stage.
By John Donohue, The New Yorker, July 14, 2014

“One sunny afternoon in London, in 1970, Hunter wrote the words to three magical Grateful Dead songs, “To Lay Me Down,” “Ripple,” and “Brokedown Palace.” He is a lyricist with few equals, and, together with Jerry Garcia, he conjured up the majority of the Dead’s original songs.”

Dead.net Official Bio

Seeking literary hero to admire? Meet Robert Hunter, primary lyricist for the Grateful Dead, ergo:

Robert Hunter joined the Grateful Dead in the fall of 1967, when he arrived at a rehearsal just in time to write the first verse of the band’s classic “Dark Star.” Though he’d never play onstage, he became not only a genuine band member but its secret Ace in the hole. Though Bob Weir’s words for “The Other One” would endure, most of the band’s early verbal efforts would not; it was Hunter’s work that would elevate their songs from ditties to rich, complete stories set to song. Hunter had fallen into the Dead’s general scene in 1961 when he’d met Garcia in Palo Alto, and he’d played in several of Garcia’s early bluegrass bands. But he’d always thought of himself as a writer — probably a novelist — and it was only in 1967 that he fulfilled his personal destiny, and enriched the Dead’s. He’s gone on to write several books of poetry, and is currently at work on a novel.

Mickey Hart in Rolling Stone

3 pack of music journalism/story-telling (Neil Young, Bob Dylan, Alex Chilton)

* First, a dispatch comes from Paul save her up David Letterman/SNL fame (and a fellow Canadian) riffing about poet/singer/everything Bob Dylan with anecdotes laden with name-drops in context here in Vanity Fair in 2009 (with David Ritz).

Bob Dylan’s Band Camp The legendary maestro remembers a soul-rattling moment with his musical—and religious—guru.

* Next up in a series of dispatch about music/journalism/stories comes connective tissue – so to speak – between Paul Schaffer and Bob Dylan (ha ha, I know)…

Neil Young has transformed himself from album to album, decade to decade, always managing to stay relevant, yet often playing for the future rather than the present.

The most salient example of this is his early 1980s album “Trans” in which he experimented with synthesizers and voice-coders and all of these electro-tools, along with his usual clever song writing and occasional guitars…

I bought the album as a young fella and was a bit confused at first expecting something more like “rust never sleeps”, but soon I understood the importance of experimentation and being true to the sounds you wanted to create (in this case, connecting with his sensory disabled son).

This article by Richard McKenna in We Are Mutants unpacks the project in nuanced detail.

“More Than Just a Number”: Defending Neil Young’s ‘Trans’

* Completing a trifecta, this dispatch chronicles the life and career (as it were) of an under-appreciated talent, Alex Chilton (see: Big Star, Boxtops and others).

You can “blame“ his erstwhile under-appreciation on poor performing record label promotion departments, being in wrong place wrong time, the usual addictions and malcontents etc. but no mistaking his influence on future musicians who combined his dedication to craft and go-for-broke skills into music which was influenced by, or about, him.

Lindsay Zoladz’s article is also a good reminder to support your local up-and-comers as any of them could be the next Alex Chilton, or rather the first themselves.

December Boy: On Alex Chilton
The late lead singer of Big Star and the Box Tops had a trove of unreleased music unearthed. What can we learn from the gifted, self-destructive genius?

 

 

 

Momento: with Danny Elfman of Oingo Boingo

Oingo Boingo: daveo disguised
with Danny Elfman of Oingo Boingo
Backstage with Danny Elfman after Oingo Boingo concert in SLC Fairground auditorium (or something), 1985 with Wall of Voodoo opening. Also enjoyed pleasant conversation with Steve Bartek.
 
Misters Elfman and Bartek have continued a long collaboration making soundtrack scores and music for film and television (especially collabs with Tim Burton, Peewee Herman and for The Simpsons and many more).
 
Also note: interesting intellectual property story about use of Oingo Boingo song in Fast Times at Ridgemont High movie will add at some point. 
 
Note: Will attempt to remember to add a better copy of this photo at some point (scanned in early days at low-resolution) 

Tragically Hip – Man, Machine, Poem tour / media + artifact round-up

Happy place: Listening to special mix…

Happy place: Listening to special mix of #GD50 > Jack Kerouac spoken word about Dean Moriarty > John Cairney reads as Rabbie Burns

Grateful Dead – Fare Thee Well Summer Scrapbook #GD50

So You Think You Know the Banjo? — THE BITTER SOUTHERNER

So You Think You Know the Banjo? — THE BITTER SOUTHERNER.

 

I’ve heard it said that most people can transform vast amounts of information into knowledge quite easily, but gaining true wisdom about a subject often comes only after someone provides context and connections to help us synthesize our solitary pillars of knowledge. In no small way, the Carolina Chocolate Drops stand in the gap between knowledge and wisdom, providing the context we all need to better understand our shared musical history and better relate to one another.

Thoughts about John Lennon dying

I remember vividly as a 4th grader in the library at Prince Charles Elementary school when i heard the news.

Cather in the Rye is still a prized treasure to me and i am pissed about fcking Chpmn tainting its legacy as well as taking away a great peacemaker.

I am in Jamaica in the shadows of Bob Marley’s cabin and can’t help but to think how the world would be different with just the presence of these two world-changers. It’s up to us now.

War(s) are/is Over if you Want it.